In the vicinity of the Half-Way House are situated the various Ridge Cemeteries, so called from being located on the Metairie ridge, a plateau of ground elevated some six or eight feet above the surrounding swamps.

Just beyond the Half-Way House is the new Metairie Cemetery, laid out on the spot of the old and famous Metairie racecourse.

These various cemeteries are beautifully laid out and embellished, and from the peculiar manner in which interments are made in tombs above ground afford a curious attraction to strangers. A double track on this line enables passengers to return by same route.

The steam cars on this line start from the same point near the Clay statue, follow the same track as the horse cars to the Half-Way House ; then by a double-track railway located on the east bank of the "New Canal" to the Lake Pontchartrain, a distance from Clay statue of nearly seven miles. At the lake terminus is the celebrated Revetment levee, which affords a fine drive and promenade.

Famous restaurants are located at this point.

From the cemeteries a line called the Bayou Bridge & Cemeteries Line runs along Metairie ridge by the Lower City Park to Bayou Bridge, where it connects with the Esplanade street line.

The Magazine & Prytania Street Lines. —The cars of these lines start on the river side of CJay Statue. Both these lines pass in common up Camp street by a single track to the junction of Prytania. At this point the Prytania street cars proceed up that street to Exposition Park, and the Magazine cars continue up Camp, by old Camp street into Magazine, at the Magazine Market; and thus along Magazine street to Louisiana avenue, in Louisiana avenue to Constance, and via Constance to the Exposition Park.

In passing up Camp street by either of these lines there will be seen on the right Lafayette square, in the centre of which is a statue of Franklin, by the celebrated sculptor Hiram Powers. Fronting the square, on Camp street, will be seen to the left the Odd Fellows' hall and the new St. Patrick's hall, and fronting the square, also on the upper side, is Dr. Palmer's Presbyterian church. Just beyond Lafayette square, and to the left, will be seen St. Patrick's Catholic church.

On Prytania street there are some of the handsomest private residences in New Orleans. In returning, the Magazine cars pass entirely down Magazine street by a double track to its intersection with Canal, and thence to the starting point near the Clay Statue. In returning by the Prytania line from the terminus at Toledano street, the cars pass down Prytania by a parallel double track to its intersection with Camp, and thence along Camp to the starting point at Clay Statue.

Levee & Barracks Line.— The cars of this line start on the river side of Clay Statue^ opposite the Custom-House. A turn is made from Canal into Peters street around the Custom-House, and thence through Old Levee back into Peters street, then along Lafayette avenue or Enghien street to Chartres, out Chartres to Poland, and through Poland to the station, at the corner of Poland and Love streets. At this station a change is made into another car, which conveys you to the slaughter-house, located on the Mississippi river, a few hundred yards beyond the United States Barracks.

From the initial point, opposite the Custom-House, there is a double track as far as Chartres street, and a single track outgoing on Chartres street, and a single track incoming on Royal.

From the station up Poland street down to the Barracks and slaughter-house, there is a double track nearly all the way, so that a passenger can return by the same general route. In leaving Canal street this line passes in front of the Jackson square, which is a most beautiful public garden, and has in the centre a magnificent equestrian statue of Andrew Jackson. Around this square are located the St. Louis Cathedral, the court rooms and the Pontalba buildings, and the whole forms one of the most picturesque sights to be seen in the Crescent City. The edifices are built after a quaint old French style of architecture, and with the entire surroundings, no picture within the limits of New Orleans offers such a field of interest and sight pleasure to the American stranger.

Just beyond the Jackson square the car passes through the French Market.

A little further on and to the left, at the corner of Esplanade street, is located the United States Mint.

On the route from the Poland street station to the slaughter-house can be seen, to the right, the convent of the Ursuline nuns, the oldest religious organization in Louisiana.

In returning by this line from the station at Poland street, the cars pass from Poland into Royal, thence by a single track to its junction with Enghien street or Lafayette avenue, thence to the corner of Chartres, where they reach the parallel double track, and return to the starting 1 oint on Canal street.

I Esplanade & Bayou Bridge Line.— The cars of this line go out Esplanade to the Bayou bridge, a distance of about three miles. It has a parallel double track, so that a passenger can return by the same route.

On Rampart street, between St. Peter and St. Ann, will be seen Congo square or Place D'Armes, and on the further side of this square is located the Parish Prison.

Both Rampart and Esplanade are two of the widest and most attractive streets in New Orleans.

At a point near the Bayou Bridge is a station leading to the Fair Grounds. These grounds are also used as the racecourse of the Louisiana Jockey Club.

Justt beyond the Fair Grounds station is the club-house, which, together with its garden and surroundings, is one of the handsomest establishments of the kind in the country.

If it i3 not desired to return by the same route, a passenger can cross the Bayou Bridge and take a car which will convey him to the Half-Way House, and thence by the Canal street line back to the Clay Statue, or, vice versa, the same tour can be performed by the Canal street line to the Half-Way House, and thence, via Bayou Bridge and Esplanade street, back to the start ing point.

On the route between the Bayou Bridge and the Half-Way House can be seen the City Park, which is famous for its magnificent live oak trees, and has been celebrated as a great dueling ground under the familiar name of The Oaks.

New Orleans and Carrollton Railroad Company.—Office, 17 Baronne street. The following lines are operated by this company:

Carrollton Line.— Starts from Baronne and Canal, up Baronne, Delord and St. Charles to Carrollton. Returns same route. Green cars; at night, green light. Leaves starting point every five minutes until 9 p.m., then every fifteen minutes until midnight, then every hour until five A.M.

Jackson Street Line.— -Starts from Baronne and Canal, up Baronne, Delord, St. Charles and Jackson to Gretna Ferry Landing. Returns same route. Red cars; at night, red light. Leaves starting point every five minutes until nine p.m., then every fifteen minutes until midnight.

Napoleon Avenue Line.— Starts from the head of Napoleon avenue, thence out Napoleon avenue to St. Charles avenue, where connects with Carrollton cars, running either to Carrollton or Canal street. No extra charge is made for passengers transferred here.

The Carrollton cars have already been described under the head of steam lines, it being half steam and half horse, the cars being conveyed to the depot on Napoleon avenue by mules or horses, and thence by steam dummies to Carrollton. The cars run along St. Charles avenue, the Fifth avenue of New Orleans.

The Jackson street cars run to the head of Jackson street, whence starts the Fourth district or Gretna ferry, connecting the city with the little town of Gretna, the capital of Jefferson parish, on the opposite side of the river.

Orleans Railroad Company.— Office, at station, Laharpe, cor. White. The following lines are operated by this company:

Canal, Du Maine & Bayou St. John Line.— Starts from Clay Statue, out Canal, Dauphin6. Dumaine, Bayou St. John and Grand Route St. John to station, Laharpe street. Returns by Broad, Ursulines (every fifteen minutes a car on this line returns by St. Peter street), Burgundy

and Canal. Blue cars; at night blue light. Leave starting point every five minutes until midnight.

Canal, Dtj Maine & Fair Grounds Line.— Starts from Clay Statue, out Canal, Dauphine, Dumaine and Broad to station and Fair Grounds. Returns by Broad, Ursulines (every fifteen minutes a car on this line returns by St. Peter street), Burgundy and Canal. Green cars; at night green light. Leave starting point every five minutes until midnight.

French Market Line. —Starts from Decatur, cor. Dumaine, out Dumaine and Broad to station and Fair Grounds. Returns by Broad, Ursulines and Decatur. Red cars ; at night red light. Leave starting point every five minutes until 9 p.m., then every fifteen minutes until midnight.

These cars traverse the most essentially French or Creole portion of the city, and give one the best opportunity to see Creole architecture, life and habits. Along their line will be seen old-fashioned adobe and tile covered roofs, large enclosed courts, and orange and banana groves. The Bayou St. John line runs along the margin of Bayou St. John for some distance through a district very Arcadian and rustic. The Fair Grounds line passes by the old Spanish cock pit, once the great rallying place for the admirers and patrons of cock fighting. It is also the short route to the Fair Grounds and the racetrack of the Louisiana Jockey Club. The French Market line connects the French with the old Creole quarter of the city.

The St. Charles Street Railway Company—office, corner of Carondelet and Eighth—operates the following lines :'

Clio, Erato, Rotal & Bourbon, or Jackson Railroad Line. —Starts from the head of Elysian Fields, up Royal, St. Charles, Delord, Dryades, and Clio to Jackson Railroad depot. Returns by Erato, Carondelet, Bourbon, Esplanade and Decatur. Red cars ; at night red light. Leaves starting point every five minutes until nine p.m., then every fifteen minutes until midnight.

Dryades & Rampart Line.— Starts from Clay Statue, up St. Charles, Delord, Dryades, St. Andrew and Baronne to station on Eighth street. Returns by Baronne, Dryades, Rampart and Canal. Green cars ; at night green light. Leaves starting point every five minutes until nine p. m., then every fifteen minutes until midnight.

Carondelet & Baronne Street Line.— Starts from Clay Statue, up St. Charles, Delord and Baronne to station on Eighth street. Returns by way of Carondelet and Canal to starting point. White cars ; by night white light. Leaves starting point every five minutes until nine p. m., then every fifteen minutes until midnight.

The Jackson railroad cars of this line connect the various railroad depots of the city. Starting from the depot of the Jackson route, they run to that of the Pontchartrain and Morgan's Louisiana & Texas Railroad, at the foot of Elysian Fields street. The cars are smaller than most of the other lines, to accommodate them to the narrow streets of the old French quarter, which they traverse. On Bourbon and Royal street are to be seen the best specimens of French and Creole architecture of the city. These streets recall some of the older boulevards of Paris. The stores on them are bright with all the latest Paris nouveautes, the signs are French and the language almost universally spoken is French. At the corner of Toulouse and Bourbon is the celebrated French Opera House ; at the corner of St. Louis and Royal is the Hotel Royale, formerly the old St. Louis.

All the lines of this company, in going out St. Charles street, pass the St. Charles Hotel, Masonic Hall, Academy of Music, St. Charles Theatre and City Hall. The Dryades street cars run by the Dryades Market.

These various lines give one communication with nearly every portion of the city.

FERRIES.

«

Opposite the city of New Orleans is Algiers, now the Fifth district and Fifteenth ward of the city; Freetown, Westwego, Gouldsboro, and Gretna, capital of Jefferson parish. With all of these New Orleans is connected by several lines of ferryboats.

The two railroads starting from the west side of the river have each its ferry. That of Morgan's Louisiana & Texas Railroad, the Southern Pacific, starts from the head of Elysian Fields street, where it has a passenger depot, reached by the Clio, Erato, Royal & Bourbon, and the Levee & Barracks cars. This ferry conveys passengers to the Algiers depot on Atlantic avenue.

The New Orleans Pacific, of the Texas & Pacific system, has a ferry from the foot of Terp* sichore street, whence passengers are conveyed to its depot on the west side of the river.

The regular ferry lines for the ordinary intercourse between the two banks of the rivei are the following :

First District.— New Orleans and Algiers Ferry Landing, Canal street, to Seguin street. Algiers.

Second District.— New Orleans and Algiers Ferry Landing, St. Ann street.

Third District.— New Orleans and Algiers Ferry Landing, Levee, foot of Barracks street, to Valette street, Algiers.

Fourth District.— New Orleans and Gretna Ferry Landing, Jackson street, to Gretna, near Oil Works.

Seventh District Ferry.— Starts from foot of Jefferson street, Seventh district, to Nine Mile Point.

Slaughter House Co.'s Ferry.— From and to Slaughter House, Algiers.

Louisiana Avenue Ferry.—To Harvey's Canal ; starts from foot Louisiana avenue.

Upper Line Ferry.— From foot of Upper Line street to Gretna.

CHAPTER V.—BY WATER.

APPROACHES TO NEW ORLEANS BY THE RIVER—THE VARIOUS OCEAN AND RIVER VESSELS REACHING CITY—WHARVES AND LANDINGS.

Lines of steamboats connect New Orleans with all the towns on the Mississippi river and its tributaries, while the ocean vessels run to every port in America and Europe.

The arrival at New Orleans, via the river, shows the city to its greatest advantage. If you come ,by way of the Gulf, you pass through the Jetties, the greatest engineering enterprise of the age, and by Eadsport, built in the midst of a wild country, neither land nor water, but a mixture of both. All the way up to the city the scenery is varied and attractive. For the first twenty miles the shores are nothing but a narrow strip of mud, separating the river from the Gulf. As you ascend higher you pass the Quarantine station, and Forts St. Philip and Jackson, which protected New Orleans against the Federal fleet for several months, but were finally passed by Farragut, and the city captured. Above this is Buras settlement, with its acres of orange groves, the finest and handsomest in the State, worth from $500 to Sl,000 an acre. Then comes the rice country, around Pointe a la Hache, with hundreds of small farms, managed by Creole farmers ; the grandest sugar plantations in the State, which make Plaquemines parish the sugar bowl of Louisiana. In the distance is the Crescent City, never looking more beautiful than when thus seen from the river, its long front of twelve miles, full of steamboats, steamers and ships, and barks of every nation. As the highest part of the city is that directly on the river, and it falls as you go towards the lake, you can go and look down from your vessel upon the streets and avenues. A river parade shows you the entire city, for New Orleans clings to the Mississippi, and is a narrow fringe along that river, seldom running back over one or two miles. You pass the battle ground of New Orleans, the Jackson monument, the Chalmette National Cemeteries, the Slaughter-house, U. S. Barracks, Jackson square, the Cathedral, Canal street, all the Railroad depots of the city, for all the lines have their freight depots directly on the river front, in close propinquity to the wharves, the Elevator, the Upper City or Exposition Park, and finally Carrollton; while on the western bank of the river will be seen Algiers, Freetown, Gouldsboro, Gretna, and other suburban villages, with their dockyards, railroad repair shops, foundries, and mills.

Coming down the river by steamboat you pass an even more picturesque country. The whole river bank is densely populated and an almost continuous town. The country on both sides is highly cultivated, and it is one succession of farms and plantations, sugar, rice, corn and tobacco. Scores of little towns look down on you from the bluffs or nestle beneath you safe behind the levee, and so much lower than your steamer that you can actually look down into the houses and see what is going on within.

The steamboats of the Mississippi are sui genens, different from the vessels traveling upon any other river. The little ones are as comfortable and as agreeable as any mode of travel can be imagined. The packets and the steamers plying between New Orleans and St. Louis and Cincinnati are really floating palaces. In most of these the old and uncomfortable berths have been done away with and the traveler is furnished instead with state-rooms provided with large bedstead, washstand, bureaus, etc., fitted up, in fine, like a room in a first-class hotel. The saloons extend the entire length of the vessel, 200 feet or so, and are as handsomely fitted up as elegant carpets, magnificent furniture, and grand pianos can make them. As for the table, the fare furnished by the steamboats is unexcelled, the table d'hote including every delicacy of the season, cooked in the finest style, for which the stewards of the river boats have obtained a world-wide reputation.

A trip by river to St. Louis or Cincinnati is a favorite excursion, and half the wedding tours from New Orleans are made by boat to these cities. One is not cramped up as in the cars

nor shaken or jolted, and can walk about, and read, play or dance. The company on the steamboat, indeed, Uveas if in a floating hotel, with all the pleasures and enjoyments of hotel life. From the decks is to be seen the panorama of the river scenerv, and the stops made at the different towns and landings give one an opportunity to step ashore and inspect.

During the carnival season, the boats from St. Louis and Cincinnati come down to the city, laden with passengers. So comfortable are they and so pleasant the accommodation, that their passengers seldom leave the vessels, but reside in them as if staying at an hotel. The steamer ties up against the river bank, at the foot of Canal street or some other important thoroughfare and remains there until the holidays are over and its passengers are anxious to return. The di stance from this landing to the central and business portion of the city is but little more than from the hotels. The passengers board on the boats, eating their meals there and sleeping there at night, but spending their mornings and evenings ashore, viewing the sights of the city or at the theatre. Whatever the time of night when one returns to the steamer, there is never any difficulty or danger in getting aboard, as the wharves are brilliantly illuminated by electric lights and well policed and guarded. This system of visiting New Orleans and spending a week or so there has grown in great favor of late years, and now the upper river boats seldom arrive at the city during the season without a large party of visitors aboard who lodge thus over the water. When the city is crowded with visitors moreover, the steamboats are converted into floating boarJing-houses and seem to accommodate several thousand guests.

Each steamship, sailing vessel and steamboat line has its special landing. The foot of Canal street is the cotton landing for vessels running in the Yicksburg and Bend trade, and whose principal freight is cotton. Below this,'immediately in front of the Sugar Sheds, is the sugar landing, where steamers engaged in the Bayou Lafourche, Teche, Atchafalaya and Bayou Sara trade, and the greater portion of whose freight is sugar, land. Still further below this is the landing for the lower coast packets, running down the river towards the Jetties. Above Canal street, the steamboats from St. Louis, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh and other points land.

In leaving New Orleans, the hour of departure for all up-river boats, whatever their destination is 5 P. M.; and 10 A. M. and 12 M. for those engaged in the lower coast trade.

The following is the division of landings in the city, and the trade for which each is set apart:

First Section— First district: Steamboat Landing—From Canal street ferry landing to the upper line of Julia street.

Second Section— First district: Barge, Flatboat and Coalboat Landing, from Julia to St. Joseph—New Orleans, Mobile & Texas Railroad, from St. Joseph to Calliope—Florida & Mexican Steamship Landing, from Calliope to Gaiennie—Upper Steamboat Landing, from Gaiennie to Thalia.

Third Section— P'irst district: Sea-going Vessels and Coalboats of the N. O. Gas Light Co. From Thalia street to upper limits of First district (Felicity street).

Fourth and Fifth Sections —Second district: Steamboat Landing—From Canal street ferry landing to St. Louis street; New York Steamship Landing—From St. Louis to Morgan's Ferry.

Sixth Section— Second district: New York Steamship Landing—From St. Ann street ferry landing to St. Pliilip street ; Sea-going Vessels, Schooners, Coalboat Landing—From St. Philip to Elysian Fields street.

Seventh Ssctijn— Third district: Sea-goiog Vessels—From Third district ferry landing to Montegut street.

Eighth Section— Third district: English and other Steamers' Landing—From Montegut to Clouet street.

Ninth Section— Third district: Sea-going vessels, Flat'ooats and Coalboat Landings—From Clouet street to lower limits of city.

Tenth Section— Fourth district : Sea-going Vessels and British and German steamers—From, Felicity Road to Jackson street ferry landing.

Eleventh Section— Fourth district: Steamships, Sea-going Vessels and Coalboat Landing— From Jackson street ferry landing to Third street.

Twelfth Section— Fourth district: Sea-going Vessels and Flatboat Landing—From Third street to upper limits of city.

U. S. Mail Steamship Co.—Second district : New Orleans, Havana, Philadelphia and New York—Opposite Jackson Square, between St. Peter and St. Ann streets.

General Coalboat Landing.— Foot Henry Clay avenue, Sixth district.

Small vessels running to Covington and Pensacola, of draft sufficient to ascend the new Canal, land at the new basin between Rampart and Liberty streets ; if of greater draught, they iaud either at Milneburg, the " old lake end," or at Spanish Fort (Bayou St. John), or Wesl End (New Canal). I

The following are the chief steamship lines running from the City, and their ticket and I freight offices :

Allen, American. Cunard, Glynn, Guion, Hamburg, Inman, Italian, National, Red Star, State, White Star and other New York lines ; office 37 Carondelet.

Anchor Line, 173 Common. Destination, Liverpool.

Catalonian Transatlantic Steamship Co., 57 Custom-house.

Compagnie Generate Transatlantique, 3}4 Carondelet.—Antwerp and Bordeaux.

Cromwell Line, N. Y. & N, O Steamships, 41 Carondelet.—New York.

Hall Line, 23 Carondelet.—Liverpool.

Harrison Line, 66 Baronne.—Liverpool.

Mississippi & Dominion Steamship Line, 48 Carondelet.—Liverpool.

Morgan's Louisiana & Texas R.R. & Steamship Office, Magazine corner Natchez.— Havana, Vera Cruz, Cedar Keys, New York, Corpus Christi, and Galveston.

New York, Havana & Mexican Mail Steamship Line, 37 Carondelet.

North German Lloyd Steamship Line, 42 Union, 1st Distrist.— Bremen.

Philadelphia & Southern Mail Steamship Co., 37 Carondelet.

Watts, Ward & Co. Line, 29 Carondelet.—Central American ports.

West India and Pacific Steamship Co., 62 Baronne.—Havana, Liverpool.

White Cross Line, 173 Common.

Oteri Pioneer Line, 48 Carondelet.—Central American ports.

New Orleans and Central American Steamship Line, 32 South Peters.—Central American ports.

Compania de Vapores de Guatemala, 61 Carondelet.—Central American ports.

The following are the chief steamboat lines running from New Orleans: ;

Anchor Line, 104 Common.—St. Louis. (

Mandeville & Covington Line, 33 Carondelet.—Lake coast.

Ohio River & Southern Transportation Co., Levee, foot of Lafayette.—Cincinnati, O.

Ouachita River Consolidated Line, 7 Delta.—Monroe, La.

Southern Transportation Line, 82 Gravier.

Red River & Coast Line, 46 Camp.—Shreveport, La.

Vicksburg, Greenville & Bayou Sara Packet Line, 52 Carondelet.—Vicksburg, Miss.

New Orleans, Baton Rouge & Bayou Sara Line. Offices: 122 Gravier, 35 Natchez, 52 Carondelet, 64 Common.

New Orleans & Bayou Teche Packet Company, 35 Natchez.—New Iberia. La.

Memphis & New Orleans Packet Co., 52 Carondelet.—Memphis. Tenn.

Merchants' & Planters' Packet Company, 85 Natchez.

Besides these, there are innumerable independent packets and lines, while both ocean steamers and sailinsr vessels run casually between New Orleans a"d other ports, on which there V? no trouble to secure cabin accommodation.

CHAPTER VI.—THE STREETS.

STREET NOMENCLATURE OF NEW ORLEANS—THE HISTORY HIDDEN IN THE STREET NAMES—DUPLICATE AND TRIPLICATE NAMES TO CONFUSE A STRANGER—A FULL STREET GUIDE OF THE CITY.

Oakey Hall, in his book, "The Manhattaner in New Orleans," goes wild over the nomenclature of the streets of the Crescent City, which he declares are the prettiest named of any in the Union. He is undoubtedly right in this. New Orleans, alone of American cities, has preserved all the romance of its earlier days in the titles of its streets, and with a simple directory one can recall the entire history of the French and Spanish dominion. Having changed its ownership no less thau five times, having passed under so many masters, having witnessed such vicissitudes of fortune, New Orleans has a history full of incident and romance, and this it tells in its street nomenclature.

The old carre or parallelogram of the original city still preserves the names given by Le Blond de la Tour, who laid it out. There have been few changes here. The rue de 1'Arsenal, Arsenal street, has given way to the rue des Ursulines, named in honor of the Ursulinenuns, who erected their convent here a century and a half ago. The rue des Quartiers, Barracks street, and the rue de 1' Hopital, Hospital street, are titles given to unnamed streets, because the government barracks and hospital were erected on them. Similarly the rue de la Douane, or Customhouse street, received its title, net from the massive granite customhouse that now stands there, but from the old wooden building, devoted to the same purpose, erected by the Spaniards a century and a quarter before. The boundary streets of the city, which marked the line of the old wall, all bear military titles referring tc the old fortifications. Esplanade street was where the troops drilled ; Kampart, rue des Remparts, marks, like the boulevards of Paris, the destroyed walls; while Canal street was the old fosse or canal which surrounded the city and which was continued as a drainage canal to the lako, and filled up only a few years ago.

Of the old" streets only two have disappeared, ru de l'Arsenal into Ursulines, and rue de Conde into Chartres.

There have been some few corruptions in the clt! names. The rue de Dauphine, named after the province of Dauphiny, in France, has dropped the accent on the e, and become simply Dauphine (pronounced Daupheen) street, as if it were named after the Dauphin's wife. The street named in honor ot the Due du Maine, has got the preposition for ever mixed with the noun, and is, and will be ever, Dumaine, instead of Maine street.

In naming the streets of the city as it grew beyond its original boundaries, a dozen different systems were pursued. The gallantry of the French Creoles is commemorated upon old city maps by a number of streets christened with the sweetest and prettiest feminine names imag^ inable. Some of these were christened after the favorite children of rich parents, but again not a few were named after favorite concubines. The old maps of New Orleans were covered with such names as Suzette, Celeste, Estelle, Angelie, Annette, and others ; many of these have died away into later titles, but not a few still survive.

The religious tendency of the population showed itself in giving religious names to many of the streets. There are several hundred saints so honored, and scarcely one in the calendar has escaped a namesake in the Crescent City. There are besides these, such streets as Conception, Religious, Nuns, Assumption, Ascension, etc.

At the time of the French revolution there was an outbreak in France of Roman and Greek fashions. The modern French tried to imitate the ancient classics by assuming the Roman dre?.? and.Roman names. The Creoles who, although dominated by the Spaniards, were red.

republicans in these days, followed that fashion and all the names of antiquity were introduced into Louisiana and survive there to this day. Achille (Achilles), Alcibiade (Alcibiades), Numa, Demosthene (Demosthenes), came into fashion. The streets found a similar fate and the new faubourg Ste. Marie was liberally christened from pagan mythology. The nine muses, three graces, the twelve greater gods and the twelve lesser ones, and the demi-gods, all stood godparents for streets. The city fathers went beyond this, and there was a Nayades and a Dryades street, a Water Work, a Euphrosine street, and so on without end.

Then came the Napoleonic wars, and with them, intense enthusiasm over the victories of the Corsican. A General of Napoleon's army who settled in Louisiana after the St. Helena captivity named the whole upper portion of the city in honor of the little Emperor. Napoleon Avenu_\ Jena and Austerlitz streets are samples which survive to this day.

In addition to these came the names and titles of the early Louisiana planters, such as Mon-tegut, Clouet, Marigny, Delord, the early Governors of Louisiana, Mayors of New Orleans, and distinguished citizens.

These, however, failed to supply the 500 miles of streets that New Orleans boasts of, with a sufficiency of names.

In the naming of streets the French are not quite so matter of fact as the Anglo-Saxons, and they have shown this in some titles they have left behind. In New Orleans no Anglo-Saxon, for instance, would ever think of naming a street Qoodohildren street, riw des Bons En/ants, or Love street, rue del''Amour, Madman's street. Mystery street, Piety street, etc. Old Bernard Marigny christened two thoroughfares in the faubourg Marigny which he laid out, " Craps " and " Bagatelle " in honor of the two games of chance at which he lost a fortune. A curious mistake was that of the first American directory-maker who insisted upon translating Bagatelle into English and described it as Trifle street.

But even when a person is acquainted with the names of the New Orleans streets, the next thing is to know how to pronounce and spell them. This is very important, for they are seldom pronounced as they would seem to be. Tchoupitoulas—pronounced Chopitoulas—and Caron-delet are the shibboleth by which foreigners are detected. No man is ever recognized as a true Orleanais uutil he can spell and pronounce these names correctly; and the serious charge made against an Auditor of the State, that he spelled Carondelet, Kerionderlet, aroused the utmost indignation of the population, who could never forgive this mistake.

The classical scholar who visits New Orleans and hears the names of the muses so frightfully distorted may regard it as unfortunate that Greek mythology had been chosen. The explanation of the mispronunciation, however, will relieve the people of New Orleans of any charge of ignorance. The Greek names are simply pronounced in the French style. Thus the street that the scholar would call Melpomene, of four syllables and with the last "e " sounded, would be in French Melpomene, and is translated by the people of New Orleans into Melpo-meen. So Calliope is Callioap; Terpsichore, Terpsikor; Euterpe, Euterp ; and others in the same way. Coliseum is accented like the French Colisee, on the second instead of the third syllable ; and even Felicity street—it is named, by the by, after a woman (Felicite), not happiness —is actually called by many intelligent persons Filly-city. The influence of the old French days is seen in the spelling of Dryades, instead of Dryads, as the word is pronounced, and in a number of other apparent violations of orthoepy or orthography, the truth being that the old French pronunciation and spelling are preserved and have become current among the English-speaking portion of the population.

The constant annexation to New Orleans of suburban villages and towns, with streets of the same name produces considerable inconvenience to strangers and even to natives of the city. There is a duplicate to nearly every name, and sometimes four or five streets bearing the same title.

Thus there is a North Peter's and a South Peter's miies apart, one in the First, the other in t.he Second district; then there is a simple Peter's in the Sixth district, and, a Peter's avenue, in.

picture1

the same division, while in the Fifth district there is a Peter street, and in the Third a Petre, pronounced Peter. A fine chance this to get confused.

There are Chestnut streets in the First, Fourth, Fifth and two in the Sixth district. And much moi confi sion of the same sort.

Anothi circumstance that is likely to deceive and mislead strangers is the preservation of the ancien mmes of the streets. These have been changed time and time again with the names, until even the residents on the streets get confused. Suppose you start down Rampart street, some will call it Love (the old name), and some Rampart. Beyond Canal you will see a building called the Circus street infirmary—this was, of old, Circus street. A little further on and you will hear that it is Hercules street, and when you get well up town, exactly half the population will swear it is St. Denis, and the other half stick to Rampart.

You want to go to the Moreau street Methodist Church and inquire for Moreau street. There is none ; it is now Chartres ; while the Craps street Church is not on Craps, but on Burgundy, its successor.

When, in addition to this, it is remembered that few of the streets in New Orleans have any signs on the corners, that these signs one encounters are often in French, and that the numbering of th i houses is very imperfect and defective, it will be seen that without a map or a good street-guide, giving not only the names of the streets to-day, but those they used to bear some years ago, a stranger can very easily lose himself in New Orleans.

STREET GUIDE.

ABBREVIATIONS.

dist district I rt right

E or e east

lft left

nw northwest

N or n north

S or s south

sw southwest

W or w west

Adams, 4th se. from and parallel to Canal avenue, from river to Nelson,7th dist.(Carrollton).

Adams, 2d east of the river from Americus, south to limits, McDonoughville (Algiers).

Adams Avenue, 31st n. of City Park, or 3d s. of lake, from Bayou St. John to Milne.

Adele, third n. of Felicity, from the river to St. Thomas, 4th dist.

Agriculture, 14th n. of Claiborne, from St. Bernard avenue to Lower Line, 3d dist.

Alabama (now Arabella).

Alexander, 3d w. of Convent of the Ursulines, from river n. to woods, 3d dist.

Alexander, 3d w. of Carrollton avenue, from Canal n. to New Metairie road, 2d dist.

Alexander, 3d w. of Carrollton, from Canal w. to New Orleans Canal, 1st dist.

Algiers, now Olivier, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Aline, 3d w. of Toledano, from the river n. to St. Charles, 6th dist.

Alix, 4th s. of Canal street Ferry Landing, from Sumner running east, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Alonzo, 2d n. of Nashville avenue, from the river w. to Laurel, 6th dist.

Amelia, 6th w. of Toledano, from the river to Clara, 6th dist.

Amen, parallel with Franklin avenue, from Lafayette avenue to the Lake, 3d dist.

Americus, 18th s. of Canal street Ferry landing, from river e. to Hancock, McDonough (Algiers).

Anna, 5th sw. from and parallel to First, from Adams to Lower Line, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Annette, 5th w. of Elysian Fields, from St. Bernard w. to the lake, 3d dist.

Annunciation, Elizabeth and Jersey are known as Annunciation st. ? 6th from river, from junction Tchoupitoulas, 1st dist., to Calhoun, 6th dist,

Annunciation Square, bounded by Race, Orange, Chippewa and Annunciation, 1st dist.

Anson, 5tb s. of Americus, from river e. to Hancock, McDonough (Algiers).

Anthonia, from Monroe avenue to the lake, 3d dist.

Anthony, 9th n. of Carrollton avenue, from Canal to New Metairie road, and recommences at Monroe avenue and runs n. to the lake, 2d dist.

Antonine, 4th w. of Louisiana avenue, from river to St. Charles, 6th dist.

Apollo, now Carondelet.

Arabella, 16th w. of Napoleon avenue, from the river n. to Claiborne, 6th dist.

Architect, between Chartres and Royal, from Port to St. Ferdinand, 3d dist.

Athis, 1st n. of Calhoun avenue, from Lafayette avenue w. to Bayou St. John, 3d dist.

Atlantic Avenue, 2d. e. of Opelousas R. R., from boundary line to Jefferson parish, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Atlantic Avenue, now Nichols.

Aubrt, 7th e. of Esplanade, from junction of Miro and St. Bernard to Gentilly road, 3d dist.

Austerlitz, 8th w. of Louisiana avenue, from river to Plaquemine, 6th dist.

Azelie, now Constance.

Bacchus, now Baronne.

Bainbridge, 8th s. of Americus, from Adams e. to Hancock, McDonough (Algiers).

Baldwin, 9th n. of Peters, from Peters w. to Lower Line, 6th dist.

Banks, 3d s. of Canal, from Johnson n. to St. Patrick's cemetery, 1st .dist.

Bank Place, bet. Camp and Magazine; from Gravier to Natchez, 1st dist.

Baronne, 1st w. of Carondelet, from Canal s to Peters avenue, 1st and 6th dists.

Barracks, 1st sw of Esplanade, from river to Broad, and from New Metairie road to lake, 2d dist.

Bartholomew, 1st n, of Claiborne, from upper Line, Jefferson City, w. to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Bartholomew, 16th s. of Lafayette avenue, from the river e. to the woods, 3d dist.

Basin (now North Basin), 5th w. of St. Charles, from Canal n. to St. Peter, 2d dist.

Basin (now South Basin), 5th w. of St. Charles, from Canal s. to Toledano, 1st and 4th dists.

Bayou Road, from junction Claiborne and Hospital, 2d dist., ne. to Gentilly road, 3d dist.

Bayou St. John, commences 8th n. of Broad and at Carondelet walk, thence n. to the lake.

Beauregard, from Marigny avenue to Lafayette avenue, 3d dist.

Belfast, ne. of and parallel to Mobile, from Lower Line to Upper Line, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Bellechasse, s. of Thalia, from Tchoupitoulas to St. Thomas, 1st dist.

Bellecastle, 3d e. of Peters avenue, from river n. to Leonie, 6th dist.

Bellegarde, now Chippewa.

Bell's Alley, bet. Peters and Decatur, 3d dist.

Benefit, 17th n. of and parallel with Claiborne, from St. Bernard avenue to Lower Line, 3d dist.

Benjamin, 1st s. of St. Charles, from Octavia w. to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Benjamin, now Thalia.

Benton, 6th above U. S. Barracks, from St. Claude (Good Children) n. to woods, 3d dist.

Berlin, 1st e. of Napoleon avenue, from river n. to Broad, 6th dist.

Bernadotte, continuation of Lower Line, from 12th to parish boundary, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Bernadotte, 7th w. of Carrollton avenue, from Canal n. to New Metairie road, 2d dist., and from Canal s. to New Orleans Canal, 1st dist.

Bernard, now St. Bernard.

Bertrand, 3d w. of Claiborne, from Common s. to Lafayette, 1st dist.

Bienville, 2d n. of Canal, from river to cemeteries, and from New Metairie road n. to lake, 2d and 3d dists.

Blackberry, 15th nw. of and parallel to Canal avenue, from South Line to North Line, 7th dist. (Carrol lton).

Blanche, now Marais.

Bolivar, 3d w. of Claiborne, from Common s. to Lafayette, 1st dist. Bonnevalle, 5th w. of Paris, from Pleasure n. to the lake, 3d dist. Bordeaux, 4th w. of Napoleon avenue, from river nw. to Upper Line, 6th dist. Boree, 7th s. of Claiborne, from Burtheville w. to Lower Line, 6th dist. Boudousquie, 2d e. of St. Charles, from Soniat to Joseph, 6th dist. Bount, 1st w. of Seguin, from Market n. to river, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Bourbon, 1st nw. of Royal, from Canal e. to Esplanade, 2d dist., and from Esplanade n. to lake, 3d dist.

Brainard, 2d w. of St. Charles, from St. Andrew s. to Philip, 4th dist. Breedlove, continuation of Terpsichore, from St. John to State, 6th dist. Breslau, 2d n. of St. George, from Toledano w. to boundary line, 6th dist. Brickyard, 4th n. of Fair grounds, from St. Bernard avenue w. to Bayou St. John, 3d dist. Bringier, 10th s. of Market, from the river e. to Sumner, 5th dist. (Algiers). Broad (now North Broad), 5th w. of Galvez, from Canal, 1st dist., n. to St. Bernard. Broad (now South Broad), 5th w. of Galvez, from Canal, 1st dist., s. to Upper Line, 6th dist Broadway, 2de. of Lower Line, Carrollton, from river n. to woods, 6th dist. Brooks, 8th n. of City Park, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist. Broome, now Lafayette.

Brown, 5th s. of the lake, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

Brutus, 1st s. of Monroe c,venue, from Lafayette avenue, w. to Bayou St. John, 3d dist. Bruxelles, 1st e. of Paris avenue, from St. Bernard avenue n. to lake, 3d dist. Burdette, or Columbus, 3d se. of and parallel to Canal avenue, from river to Lower Line, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Burgundy, 1st e. of Rampart, from Canal, 2d dist., ne. to Columbus, and from Columbus e. to lower limits, 3d dist.

Burke, 1st n. of Claiborne, from Upper Line to State, 6th dist.

Burthe, nw. of and parallel to First, from Lower Line to Monroe, 7th dist. (Carrollton). Butler, 6th s. of the lake, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist. Cadiz, 2d w. of Napoleon avenue, from River to Broad, 6th dist. Calhoun, 3d w. of State, from Levee, n. to boundary line, 6th dist.

Calhoun Avenue, n. of and parallel with St. James avenue, from Bayou St. John to Lafayette avenue, Milneburg.

Calliope, Louisa and Duplantier are known as Calliope, 10th s. of Canal, from river to woods, 1st dist.

Calopissa, 25th nw. of First, from Upper Line, to Marley avenue, 6th dist. Cambronne, 3d nw. of and parallel to Canal avenue, from river to parish boundary, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Camp, 8th w. of river, from Canal, to Greenville, 1st, 4th and 6th dists. Canada, 16th n. of First, from Walnut to Lower Line, 6th dist. Canal, dividing 1st and 2d dists. from river w. to limits.

Canal Avenue, 3d w. of Opelousas R. R. from river to boundary line of Jefferson Parish, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Canonge, 1st w. of eastern boundary, from U. S. Barracks n. to woods, rear of 3d dist. Carnot, 2d s. of Monroe avenue, from Lafayette avenue w. to Bayou St. John, 3d dist. Carondelet, 10th w. of river, from Canal 1st dist. to St. Charles and Soniat, 6th dist. Carroll, 1st w. of Carondelet, from Poydras to Perdido, 1st dist.

Carrollton, 1st s. of First, from Walnut to Lower Line, 6th dist.

Carrollton Avenue, from river ne. to New Orleans Canal, parish boundary, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Carrollton Avenue, 14th w. of Broad, from Canal, 1st dist. to N. O. Canal; and from Canal to Metairie road, 2d dist.

Carondelet Basin, bounded by Toulouse, Basin, Franklin and Carondelet walk.

Carondelet Walk, n. bank of Carondelet Canal and Basin from St. Claude to Bayou St. John, 2d dist.

Casacalvo, now Koyal.

Cass, 5th s. of the lake, from Bayou St. John to Orleans, 2d dist.

Castiglione, 10th n. of Esplanade, from Bayou road to St. Bernard avenue, 3d dist.

Cato, from Bayou St. John e. to Lafayette avenue.

Cedar, now Howard.

Celeste, 2d s. of Market, from Felicity e. to river, 1st dist.

Charbonet, 11th e. of the Convent of the Ursulines, from Dauphine to St. Claude, 3d dist.

Chartres, 6th w. of river, from Canal n. to Frenchmen, thence e. to limits, 3d dist.

Chestnut, 5th e. of Opelousas R. R. from river to woods, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Chestnut, 3d e. of Lower Line, from the river n. to woods, 6th dist.

Chestnut, between Camp and Coliseum, 4th dist. from Felicity s. to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Child, 16th s. of McDonough avenue, from Franklin to Hancock, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Chippewa, bet. Annunciation and St. Thomas, from Melpomene, 1st dist. to Aline, 6th dist.

Choctaw, 2nd n. of Claiborne, from Foucherville to Lower Line, 6th dist.

Church (late St. Mary and late St. Francis), 8)4 w. of the river, from Poydras to Julia, 1st dist.

Church, 2d s. of Canal st. Ferry landing, from the river se. to Market, 5th dist (Algiers).

Circus (now Rampart).

Claiborne (now North Claiborne), 7th w. of Rampart, from Canal n. to St. Bernard avenue, thence e. to limits, 2d and 3d dist.

Claiborne (now South Claiborne) 1st, 4th and 6th dists., from Canal street, to Lower line, 6th dist.

Clara, 12th w. of St. Charles, from Gravier s. to State, 1st, 4th and 6th dists.

Clark (now North Clark), 1st w. of Hagan avenue, from Canal n. to Bayou St. John, 2d dist.

Clark (now South Clark), 1st w. of Hagan avenue, from Canal s. to Melpomene, 4th dist.

Clay, bet. Front and Peters, from Customhouse to Toulouse, 2d dist.

Clay, nw of and parallel to Canal avenue, from Upper Line to North Line, 7th dist.(Carrolton).

Clay (now Henry Clay) avenue, 6th dist.

Clay Square, bet. Second and Third, Chippewa and Annuciation, 4th dist.

Clemens, 2d n. of City Park, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

Clinton, bet. Peters and Decatur, from Customhouse to Bienville, 2d dist.

Clinton, 6th se. of and parallel to Canal avenue, from river to Lower Line, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Clio, llths. of Canal, from Camp w. to Clark, 4th dist.

Clouet, 6th e. of Lafayette avenue, from river n. to woods, 3d dist.

Coffee, now Dryad es.;

Coculus, 3d s. of Claiborne from Upper Line to State, 6th dist.

Cohn, 13th ne. of and parallel to First, from Lower Line to Upper Line, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Coliseum, 2d e. of St. Charles, from Melpomene, 1st dist. s. to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Coliseum Square, junction of Camp and Coliseum, bet. Melpomene and Euterpe, 1st dist.

Columbia, 4th n. of Edinburgh avenue, from Lafayette avenue w. to Bayou St. John, 3d dist.

Columbus, 2d n. of Esplanade, from Rampart w. to Gentilly road, 3d dist.

Columbus, 2d n. of Americus, from river to Hancock, 5th dist. (Algiers),

Columbus, now Bernadotte (Carrollton).

Commerce, bet. Peters and Tchoupitoulas, from Poydras to St. Joseph, 1st dist.

Commercial, 2d sw. of and parallel to First, from Lower Line to Story, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Commercial Place, between Grarier and Poydras, from Camp to St. Charles, 1st dist.

Common, 1st s. of Canal, from river w. to limits, 1st dist.

Conde, now Chartres.

Congress, 11th e. of Lafayette avenue, from river n. to woods.

Conrad, 8th s. of the lake from Bayou St. John, to Milne, 2nd dist.

Conret, between Washington avenue and 6th, from St. Charles to Prytania, 4th dist.

Constance, 6th w. of river, formerly Foucher, from Poydras, s. to Calliope, 1st dist; recommences at Calliope, s. to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Constantinople, 10th w. of Louisiana avenue from the river to Rampart, 6th dist.

Conti, 3rd n. of Canal, from river w. to cemeteries, 2nd dist., and recommences at New Metairie road and runs to the lake, 3rd dist.

Copernicus, 1st s. of Americus, from river to Hancock, McDonough (Algiers).

Cortes (now South Cortes), 4th w. of Hagan avenue, from Canal s. to New Canal, Id dist.

Cortes (now North Cortes), 4th w. of Hagan avenue, from Canal n. to Bayou St. John, 2d dist.

Corwin, 3d n. of City Park from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

Cotton Press (now Press), 3d dist.

Craps (now Burgundy).

Crittenden, 4th n. of City Park, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

Crossman, 1st n. of Canal, from river to Peters, 2d dist.

Customhouse, 1st n. of Canal, from river w. to New Metairie road, 2d dist., thence n. to the lake, 3d dist.

Cypress, n. of and parallel to Eighth, from Lower line to Upper line, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Ctpress. 1st s. of Lafayette, from Liberty to Prieur, 1st dist.

Dabadie, 6th n. of Esplanade, from St. Bernard avenue w. to Gentilly road, 3d dist.

Dauphine, 10th w. of river, from Canal n. to Kerlerec, thence e. to limits, 2d and 3d dists.

David, bet. Carrollton avenue and Solomon, from Canal to Metairie Road, 2d dist.

Dawns, 11th s. of the lake, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

De Armas, 9th s. of Canal st. Ferry landing, from river e. to limits, 5th dist. (Algiers).

De Armas, 4th sw. of and parallel to First, from Lower Line to Burdette, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Decatur, late Victory and Old Levee, 5th w. of river, from Canal n. to Esplanade, 2d dist. thence e. to St. Ferdinand, 3d dist.

Deers, 10th e. of Elysian Fields, from junction of Lafayette avenue and Virtue n.

Delachaise, 1st s. of Louisiana avenue, from river n. to Miro, 6th dist.

Delaronde, 3d se. of Canal street ferry landing, from river ne. to Moss, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Delta, 2d w. of river from Canal s. to St. Joseph, 1st dist

Delert, 1st n. of Lower Line, from the river to the woods, 3d dist.

Delord, 9th s. of Canal, from river w. to Broad, 1st dist.

Delord, 1st s. of Claiborne, from Upper Line w. to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Derbigny (now South Derbigny), 1st w. of Claiborne, from Canal s. to Upper Line, 6th dist.

Derbignt (now North Derbigny), 1st w. of Claiborne, from Canal n. to St. Bernard.

Desire, 9th e. of Lafayette avenue, from river n. to woods, 3d dist.

Destrehan, 13th n. of St. Charles, from Walnut w. to Lower Line, 6th dist.

Deter, 6th w. of Paris, from Pleasure n. to the lake, 3d dist.

D'Hemecourt, 5th s. of Canal, from junc. Common and Lopez w. to New Canal, 1st dist.

Division, bet. Rousseau and St. Thomas, from First to Second, 4th dist.

Dixon, next to Seventeenth, from North Line to parish boundary, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Dolhonde (now North Dolhonde), 1st e. of Broad, from Canal n. to St. Bernard avenue. 3d dist.

Dolhonde (now South Dolhonde), 1st e. of Broad, from Canal, 1st dist., s. to Berlin, 6th dist.

Dolophon, 4th s. of the lake from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

Dorsiere, bet. Decatur and Chartres, from Canal to Customhouse, 2d dist.

Drtades, 1st e. of Rampart, from Canal s. to junc. St. Charles and Joseph, 6th dist.

Dryden, e. of and parallel to Franklin avenue from Lafayette avenue to the lake, 3d dist.

Ducayet, 3d w. of Gentilly road from Esplanade n. to Pleasure, 3d dist.

Dublin, 1st nw. of and parallel to Canal avenue, from First to parish boundary, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Duels, 12th n. of Claiborne, from St. Bernard avenue, e. to Elysian Fields, 3d dist.

Dufossat, 9th w. of Napoleon avenue, from river to St. George, 6th dist.

Dumaine, 9th n. of Canal, from river, w. to New Metairie road, 2d dist. and thence n. to the lake, 3d dist.

Duplessis, 7th w. of London avenue, from St. Bernard avenue, to the lake.

Duplantier, now Calliope.

Dupre (now North Dupre), 2d w. of Broad, from Canal n. to Esplanade, 2d dist.

Dupre (now South Dupre), 2d w. of Broad, from Canal, s. to New Canal, 1st dist.

Eagle, nw of. and parallel to Canal avenue, from river to parish boundary, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Eagle, now Willow.

Edinburgh Avenue, 4th from the lake, from Bayou St. John to Lafayette avenue. Milneburg.

Edinburgh, n. of and parallel to Fifteenth, from North Line to boundary, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Edward, now Melpomene.

Eighth, 3d w. of Washington avenue, from river n. to Rampart, 4th dist.

Eighth, 14th ne. of and parallel to First, from Lower Line to Upper Line, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Eighteenth, 34th ne. of and parallel to First, from North Line to Parish boundary, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Eleonore, 5th w. of Peters avenue, from river n. to St. Charles, 6th dist.

Eleventh, 20th ne. of and parallel to First, from Lower Line to Upper Line, 7th dist, (Carrollton).

Eliza, 5th se. of Canal street ferry landing, from river ne. to Sumner, thence e. to limits, 5th dist. *

Elizabeth, now Annunciation.

Elmira. -0th e. of Lafayette avenue, from river n. to woods, 3d dist.

Elmira Avenue, 4th w. of Opelousas R. R., from river boundary line of Jefferson Parish, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Eltsian Fields, line of the Pontchartrain R. R., from river to the lake, 3d dist.

Encampment, 2d w. of Bayou Sauvage, from Grand Route St. John n. to Pleasure, 3d dist.

Enghien, now Lafayette avenue.

Erato, 12th s. of Canal, from river w. to woods, 1st dist.

Esplanade, dividing line bet. 2d and 3d dists. from river nw. to Bayou St. John, and recommences at New Metairie road, and runs n. to the river.

Estelle, now Thalia.

Esther, 4th sw. of St. Charles, from Foucherville to Lower Line, 6th dist.

Esther, 6th sw. of and parallel to First, from Hillary to Lower Line, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Euphrosine, 1st n. of Calliope, from Rampart w. to woods.

Euterpe, 7th s. of Tivoli Circle, from Coliseum nw. to Felicity, 1st dist.

Euterpe, 1st s. of Terpsichore, from junction Broad and Toledano w. to St. John avenue, 6th dist.

Evelina, 6th se. of Canal street Ferry landing; from Church ne. to Sumner, thenee e. to limits, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Exchange Alley, bet. Royal and Chartres, from Custom-house to St. Louis, 2d dist.

Exchange Passage, bet. Royal and Chartres, from St. Peter to St. Anthony square, 2d dist.

Exchange Place, bet. Eoyal and Chartres, from Canal to Custom-house, 2d dist.

Felicia, 2d sw. of St. Charles, from Foucherville to Lower Line, 6th dist.

Feliciana, 5th e. of Lafayette avenue, from St. Claude n. to woods, 3d dist.

Felicity, dividing 1st and 4th districts, from river nw. to woods.

Ferdinand, 7th n. of river, from Walnut w. to Lower Line, 6th dist.

Fifteenth, 27th ne. and parallel to First, from Lower Line to Upper Line, 7th dist. (Car-rollton).

Fifth, 3d w. of Broad, from Ursulines n. to Esplanade, 2d dist.

Fifth, 8th ne. of and parallel to First, from Lower Line to Upper Line, 7th dist. (Carrollton)

Fillmore Avenue, 26th n. of City Park, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

First, 7th s. of Felicity, from river w. to Dolhonde, 4th dist.

First, head of depot Carrollton R. R., from Foucher, boundary, Greenville to Madison, 2d dist. (Carrollton).

First (now Hagan avenue).

Fish, 1st s. of the lake, from Bayou St. John w. to St. Louis, 3d dist.

Fishermen's Canal, forming the boundary line bet. the Parish of Orleans and Parish of St. Bernard and running into Bayou Bienvenue*, 3d dist.

Floridas, lstn. of Grand Route St. John, from Bayou Sauvage w. to Bayou St. John, 2d and 3d dists.

Florida Walk, 11th n. of Claiborne, from Elysian Fields e. to limits, 3d dist.

Force (now La Force).

Forshey, ne. of and parallel to Fourteenth, from Lower Line to Upper Line 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Forstall, 2d e. of the Convent of the Ursulines, from the river to the woods, 3d dist.

Forstall, 9th n. of St. Charles, from Peters avenue to Bloominsdale, 6th dist.

Fortin, 2d e. of Bayou St. John, from Pleasure n. to Bayou, 3d dist.

Foucher (now Constance).

Foucher, 3d w. of Louisiana avenue, from river n. to Green, 6th dist.

Fourth, 1st and 2d dist. (now Gayoso).

Fourth, 1st n. of Washington avenue, from river w. to Broad, 4th dist.

Fourteenth, 25th ne. of and parallel to First, from Lower Line to Upper Line, 7th dist. (Carrollton)

Fox, 10th s. of and parallel to Monroe avenue, from Bayou St. John to Lafayette avenue, 3d dist.

France, 6th w. of the Convent of the Ursulines, from the river to the woods, 3d dist.

Frankfort, 3d n. of Edinburgh avenue, from Lafayette avenue w. to Bayou St. John, Milneburg.

Franklin (now South Franklin), 2d w. of Rampart, from Canal s. to New Canal, 1st dist., thence to Philip, 4th dist.

Franklin (now North Franklin), 2d w. of Rampart, from Canal n. to Corondelet walk. 2d dist.

Franklin, 4th e. of river, from Market s. to limits, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Frederick Square, bounded by Fifteenth, Hamilton, Edinburgh and Laurel Grove, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Fremont, 15th n. of City Park, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

French, 17th e. of Lafayette avenue, from river to woods, 3d dist.

Frenchmen, 1st w. of Elysian Fields, from Esplanade n. to lake, 3d dist.

Freret (formerly Jacobs), 6th w. of Rampart, from Canal to State, 1st and 6th dists.

Front (now North Front), 3d w. of river, from Canal n. to Toulouse, 3d dist.

Front (now South Front), 3d w. of river, from Canal s. to Celeste, then from Felicity, 1st w. of river, sw. and w. to lower line of Carrollton, 1st, 4th, and 6th dists.

Fulton, 4th w. of river, from Canal s. to Delord, 1st dist.

Gaiennie, bet. Calliope and Erato, from river w. to Camp, 1st dist.

Gasquet, 5th s. of Melpomene, from Broad w. to Second, 6th dist.

Gayoso (now South Gayoso), 3d w. of Broad, from Canal, 1st dist., s. to Broad, 6th dist.

Gayoso (now North Gayoso), 3d w. of Broad, from Canal w. to Esplanade, 2d dist.

Gaines, commences at Lafayette avenue, cor. Socrates, and runs n. to the lake, 3d dist.

Gaines, 10th n. of City Park, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

Gallatin, 1st w. of river, from Ursulines n. to Barracks, 2d dist.

Gallatin, 3d s. of Americus, from river e. to Hancock, McDonough (Algiers.)

Galvez (now South Galvez), 5th w. of Claiborne, from Canal s. to Peters avenue, 6th dist.

Galvez (now North Galvez), 5th w. of Claiborne, from Canal n. to St. Bernard avenue, 2d dist.

General Taylor, 8th w. of Toledano, from river n. to Rocheblave, 6th dist.

Genois (now South Genois) 2d w. of Hagan avenue, from Canal s. to New Canal, 1st dist.

Genois (now South Genois), 2d w. of Hagan avenue, from Canal n. to Bayou St. John, 2d dist.

Genius, 5th n. of Claiborne, from St. Bernard avenue, e. to Lower Line, 3d dist.

Gentilly Avenue, continuation 6f Bayou road, commencing at Broad and running along s. bank of Bayou Sauvasie to Fort McComb, Parish St. Bernard.

Girod (now Villere), 3d dist.

Girod, 6th s. of Canal, from river w. to Liberty, 1st dist.

Girond (now Howard).

Good Children (now St. Claude).

Gordon, 5th w. of U. S. Barracks, from river n. to woods, 3d dist.

Goslin (now Vailette), 8th dist. (Algiers).

Grand Route St. John, 3d n. of Esplanade, from Bayou Sauvage w. to Bayou St. John, crossing Esplanade, 2d dist.

Gravier, 2d s. of Canal, from river, nw. to New Canal, 1st dist.

Greatmen (now Dauphine), 3d dist.

Great Route (now Louisiana avenue), 6th dist.

Green, 7th n. of St. Charles, from Toledano s. to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Hagan Avenue (now North Hagan avenue), 7th w. of Broad, from Canal n. to Ursulines, 2d dist.

Hagan Avenue (now South Hagan avenue), 7th w. of Broad, from Canal s. to New Canal, 1st dist.

Hamburg, 1st w. of Paris avenue, from St. Bernard avenue to the lake, 3d dist.

Hampson, 1st ne. of and parallel to First, from Lower Line to Madison, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Hancock, 3d w. of U. S. Barracks, from river n. to woods, 3d dist.

Harmony, 2d e. of Toledano, from river to Magazine, 4th dist.

Harney, 9th n. of City Park, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

Harrison Avenue, 16th n. of City Park, from Bayou St, John to New Orleans, 2d dist.

Havana, 1st w. of London avenue, from junction of Miro and St. Bernard avenue n. to lake, 3d dist.

Hendree, 6th w. of Opelousas R.R., from river s. to boundary line of Jefferson Parish, 5th dist.

Henderson, bet. Terpsichore and Robin, from river w. to Tchoupitoulas, 1st dist.

Henrietta, 2d s. of Washington avenue, from Telemachus to Carrollton avenue, 6th dist.

Henrt, 13th n. of St. Charles, continuation of Willow, from Upper Line w. to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Hercules, now Rampart.

Herschel, 7th s. of McDonough avenue, from Washington e/.to HancocK, 5th dist.

He via, now Lafayette.

History, now Kerlerec.

Hodge, 3d ne. of St. Charles, continuation of Galvez, from Peters avenue w. to Calhoun, Cth dist.

Homer, 6th s. of Canal street Ferry Landing, from river e. to limits, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Hope, 2d n. of Broad, from St. Bernard avenue to Elysian Fields, 2d dist.

Hopkins, 3d n. of Claiborne, from State to Fouchersville, 6th dist.

Hospital, 2d s. of Esplanade, from river w. to Broad, 2d dist.; recommences at New Metairie road and runs north to the lake.

Howe, 1st e. pf St. John, from Esplanade n. to Pleasure, 3d dist.

Humanity, 17th n. of and parallel to Claiborne, from St. Bernard avenue to Lower Line, 3d dist.

Hunter, 1st n. of Thalia, from Peters to Tchoupitoulas, 1st dist.

Hunters, 1st e. of Franklin avenue, from Lafayette avenue, n. to lake, 3d dist.

Hurst, 3d n. of Prytania, from junction St. Charles and Valmont w. to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Ida, 2d s. of St. Charles, from Walnut w. to Lower Line, 6th dist.

Industry, 12th n. of and parallel to Claiborne, from St. Bernard avenue to Lower Line.

Independence, 12th e. of Lafayette avenue, from river n. to Woods, 3d dist.

Independence Square, bounded by Urquhart, Robertson, Spain and Music, 3d dist.

Jackson, 4th s. of Felicity, from river nw. to Miro, 4th dist.

Jackson, 1st s. of Market, from river e. to limits, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Jackson, 8th nw. of and parallel to Canal avenue, from river to parish boundary, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Jackson Avenue, 21st n. of City Park, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

Jackson Square (formerly Place d'Armes), between Peters and Chartres, St. Peter and St. Ann, fronting St. Louis Cathedral, 2d dist.

Jacob or Jacobs, now Freret.

James, 6th sw. of Melpomene, from Broad to boundary,

Jeanna, 14th e. of Lafayette avenue, from river n. to woods, 3d dist.

Jefferson, 4th nw. of and parallel to Canal avenue, from river to parish boundary, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Jefferson, bet. Toulouse and St. Peter, from Levee to Chartres, 2d dist.

Jefferson, 1st e. of river, from Market s. to Limits, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Jena, 1st w. of Napoleon avenue, from river n. to Broad, 6th dist.

Jennet, 2d n. of Prytania, from Robert w. to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Jersey, now Annunciation.

Johnson (now North Johnson), 4th w. of Claiborne, from Canal n. to Lafayette avenue, 2d and 3d dists.

Josephus (formerly Josephine), 14th n. of River, from Lafayette avenue e. to limits, 3d dist.

Josephine, now Josephus, 3d dist.

Josephine, 3d s. of Felicity, from river w. to Melpomene, 4th dist.

Josephine, 21st e. of Lafayette avenue, from river n. to woods, 3d dist.

Julia, 6th s. of Canal, from river w. to Broad, 1st dist.

Jumonville, 4th w. of and parallel to Paris avenue, from St. Bernard avenue to the lake, 3d dist.

Kerlerec, 1st n. of Esplanade, from Chartres w. to Bayou Road, 3d dist.

Labatut, w. line of Fair Grounds, from Esplanade s. to Pleasure, 3d dist.

Lafayette, 1st s. of Poydras, from river w. to Rocheblave, 1st dist.

Lafayette Avenue (formerly Enghien), 4th e. of Elysian Fields, from river ne. to woods, 3d dist.

Lafayette Square, bounded by Camp and St. Charles, North and South, 1st dist.

La Force, 7th n. of Claiborne, from Lafayette avenue e. to limits, 3d dist.

Laharpe, 3d n. of Esplanade, from junction Marais and St. Bernard aveuue w. to Gentilly road, 3d dist.

Lannes, 18th nw. of and parallel to Canal avenue, from South Line to North Line, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Lane, 16th s. of the lake, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

Lapeyrouse, 4th n. of Esplanade, from Claiborne n. to Gentilly road, 3d dist.

Lapeyrouse, 10th s. of Canal street ferry landing, from river to Sumner, 5th dist. (Algiers).

La Salle, between New Orleans Canal and cemeteries, 1st dist.

Laurel, 5th w. of river, from Felicity s. to Calhoun, 4th and 6th dists.

Laurel Grove, 11th nw. of and parallel to Canal avenue, from Upper Line to North Line, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Laurent (now Rampart).

Lavergne, 4th ne. of Canal street Ferry-landing, from river se. to Peter, 5th dist.

Law, lstn. of Broad, from St. Bernard avenue e. to Lower Line, 3d dist.

Leonidas, 5th nw. of, and parallel to Canal avenue, from river to parish boundary, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Leomdas, 4th s. of Monroe avenue, from Lafaye^e avenue w. to Bayou St. John, 3d dist.

Leontine, 6th w, of Upper Line, from river n. to St. Charles, 6th dist.

Leonce, 8th n. of St. Charles, from State w. to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Lepage, from junction Broad and Bayou road nw. to Grand Route St. John, 3d dist.

Lesseps, 18th e. of Lafayette avenue, from river to woods, 3d dist.

Levee, 4th dist. (now Tchoupitoulas), from Felicity to Toledano.

Levee or Front Levee, 1st and 4th dists. (now Water).

Levee or New Levee, 1st, 2d and 3d dists. (now Peters).

Levee, 2d n. of river, from Toledano s. to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Levee, 2d from and parallel to river, from Lower Line to Upper Line, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Liberal, 6th n. of Claiborne, from Lafayette avenue, e. to limits, 3d dist.

Liberal (now Camp).

Liberty (formerly North Liberty), 3d w. of Rampart, from Canal n. to Esplanade, 2d dist.

Liberty (now South Liberty), 3d w. of Rampart, from Canal s. to Philip, 4th dist.

Livaudais, e. of Bayou St. John, from Pleasure to Pelopidas, 3d dist.

Livingston, 1st n. of Pelopidas, from Bayou St. John to Lafayette avenue, 3d dist.

Live Oak, nw. of and parallel to Canal avenue, from Upper Line to Lower Line.

Live Oak (now Constance).

Locust, now Pine, 1st e. of Lower Line, from river n. to woods, 6th dist.

Locust, 6th w. of Rampart, from Common, 1st dist. s. to State, 6th dist.

London Avenue, 8th w. of Elysian Fields, from junction St. Bernard avenue and Prieur n. to lake, 3d dist.

Long, 5th n. of St. Charles, from State to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Lopez (now South Lopez), 5th w. of Broad, from Canal s. to New Canal, 1st dist.

Lopez (now North Lopez), 5th w. of Broad, from Canal n. to Ursulines, 2d dist.

Louisa, 1st dist. (now Calliope).

Louisa, 7th e. of Lafayette avenue, from river n. to woods, 3d dist.

Louisville, between Customhouse and Bienville, from New Metairie road to the lake, 3d dist.

Louisiana Avenue, 1st w. of Toledano, from river n. to Broad, 6th dist. Lower Line, divides Greenville and Carrollton from river to parish boundary, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Love (now Rampart).

Lyon, 5th w. of Napoleon avenue, from river n. to Prytania, 6th dist.

Macarty, 3d sw. of and parallel to First, from Lower Line to Washington, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Madison, bet. St. Ann and Dumaine, from Peters to Chartres, 2d dist. Madison, 2d e. of river, from Market s. to limits, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Madison, nw. of and parallel to Canal avenue, from river to parish boundary, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Madmen, e. of and parallel to Franklin avenue, from Lafayette avenue to the lake, Milne-burg.

Magazine, 6th w. of river, from Canal, 1st dist. s. to Toledano, thence se. to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Magdalen (now Magnolia).

Magellan, 9th n. of Americus, from river e. to Hancock, 5th dist. Magistrate, 9th n. of Claiborne, from Lafayette avenue e. to limits, 3d dist. Magnolia, 7th w. of Rampart, from Common, 1st dist. s. to Toledano, 4th dist. thence se. to lower line of Carrollton, 6th dist.

Magnolia Walk (now Broadway), 6th dist.

Mahomet, 2d w. of Lafayette avenue, from the lake s. to New York, 3d dist.

Main (now Dumaine).

Mandeville, 2d e. of Elysian Fields, from river n. to lake, 3d dist.

Manuel, 1st w. of the Ursulines Convent, from river to woods, 3d dist.

Marais, 4th w. of Rampart, from Canal n. to St. Bernard avenue, thence e. to Lafayette avenue, thence se. (formerly Morales) to Lower Line. 3d dist.

Marengo, 11th w. of Toledano, from river n. to Clara, 6th dist.

Marigny, 1st e. of Elysian Fields, from river to lake, 3d dist.

Marigny Avenue, north city limits, Elysian Fields to Bayou St. John.

Market, 3d s. of Patterson, from river e. to limits, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Market, bet. Richard and St. James, from river w. to Felicity, 1st dist.

Market, 5th n. of river, from Walnut w. to Lower Line, 6th dist.

Market Place, Peters bet. Market and St. James, 1st dist.

Marks, n. of and parallel to Eighteenth, from North Line to parish boundary, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Marley Avenue, se. of and parallel to Canal avenue, from Belfast to parish boundary, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Marshall, 7th s. of Melpomene, from Broad w. to Peters avenue, 6th dist.

Martin (now Willow).

Mason, 5th n of City Park, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

Maunsel (now Magnolia).

Maurepas, 2d n. of Grand Route St. John, from Bayou Sauvage w. to Esplanade, 3d dist.

McDonough Avenue, 17th s. of Canal street ferry landing, from river e. to limits, 5th dist.

Melicerte (now Erato)

Melpomene, 8th s. of Julia, from St. Thomas w. to woods, 1st dist.

Memphis, 1st w. of and parallel with St. Louis, from New Metairie road to the lake, 3d dist.

Mendez, 1st s. of Calhoun avenue, from Bayou St. John.

Mexico, 3d s. of the lake, from Bayou St. John w. to Ursulines, 3d dist.

Michael (now Laurel).

Minturn, continuation of Broad, from Upper Line w. to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Millaudon, 7th se. of and parallel to Canal avenue, from river to First, 7th dist. (Carrollton). Milne, 1st w. of Customhouse, from Metairie road n. to the lake, 2d dist. Milton, 12th s. of Americus, from Madison e. to Hancock, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Miro (now North Miro), 6th w. of Claiborne, from Canal n. to St. Bernard avenue, thence e. to Lafayette avenue, 2d and 3d dists.

Miro (now South Miro), 6th w. of Claiborne, from Canal s. to Lower Line of Carrollton, 1st, 4th and 6th dists.

Mithra, 17th s. of the lake, from Lafayette avenue w. to Bayou St. John.

Mobile, 2d n. of and parallel to Ninth, from Foucber, boundary to Upper Line 5 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Moliere, commences at Calhoun avenue, cor. Lafayette avenue, and runs n. to the lake, 3d dist.

Morales (now Marais), 3d dist.

Monroe, 4th w. of U. S. Barracks, from river n. to woods, 3d dist.

Monroe, 9th nw. of and parallel to Canal avenue, from river to parish boundary, 9th dist. (Carrollton).

Monroe, 3d e. of river, from Market to limits, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Monroe Avenue, 1st rear City Park, from Bayou St. John to Milne.

Montegut, 4th e. of Lafayette avenue, from river n. to woods, 3d dist.

Morean (now Chartres).

Mouton, 10th s. of the lake, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

Murat, 11th w. of Hagen avenue, from Canal s. to New Canal, 1st dist.

Mystery, 4th e. of Bayou St. John, from Esplanade n. to Fair Grounds, 3d dist.

Napoleon, 9th w. of Hagan avenue, from Canal s. to New Canal, 1st dist.

Napoleon, 9th w. of Hagan avenue, from Canal n. to Metairie road, and thence n. to tne lake, 2d dist.

Napoleon, n. of and parallel to Ninth, from Lower Line to Upper Line, 7th dist. (Algiers).

Napoleon Avenue, 14th sw. of Toledano, from river n. to Broad, 6th dist.

Nashville, 11th w. of Upper Line, from river n. to woods, 6th dist.

Natchez, between Gravier and Poydras, from Peters w. to Camp, 1st dist.

Nayades, now St. Charles.

Nelson, n. of and parallel to Mobile, from Foucher, boundary to Upper Line.

New Orleans, from junction St. Bernard avenue and Derbigny n. to lake, 3d dist.

New York, 3d s. of Edinburgh avenue, from Lafayette avenue w. to Bayou St. John, Milneburg.

Newton, 7th s. of Canal street Ferry landing, from river e. to limits, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Ney, 15th nw. of and parallel to Canal avenue, from North Line to South Line, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Ninth, 3d e. of Toledano, from river n. to Chestnut, 4th dist.

Ninth, 15th n. of and parallel to First, from Lower Line to Upper Line.

North, ns. of Lafayette square, from Camp to St. Charles, 1st dist.

North Market, 2d s. of Julia, from river w. to Tchoupitoulas. 1st dist.

Notre Dame, bet Girod and Julia, from river w. to Magazine.

Nuns, 1st n. of Felicity, from river nw. to Felicity, 1st dist.

Oak, 2d s. of Esplanade, from Gcntilly road w. to Rendon, 2d dist.

Oak, 6th n. of St. Charles, from Walnut w. to Lower Line, 6th dist.

Octavia, 1st w. of Peters avenue, from river n. to woods, 6th dist.

Octavia, lsts of Market, from Bouny e. to Moss, 5th dist.

Odin, 2d s. of Calhoun avenue, from Lafayette avenue w. to Bayou St. John. 3d dist.

Old Basin, bet. Carondelet walk and Toulouse. Franklin and St. Claude, 2d dist.

Old Leveb, now Decatur.

Old Magazine, 1st w. of Constance, from Felicity s. to St. Mary, 4th dist.

Olympia, 12th w. of Hagan avenue, from Canal n. to New Metarie road, 2d dist.

Olivier, 7th w. of Opelousas R.R., from river s. to Market, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Onzaga, 5th n. of Esplanade, from St. Bernard avenue nw. to Gentilly road, 3d dist.

Orange, 12th s. of Julia, from river w. to camp, 1st dist.

O'Reilly, 8th n. of Esplanade, from St. Bernard avenue w. to Gentilly road, 8d dist.

Orleans, 7th n. of Canal, from Royal w. to New Metairie road, 2d dist.

Orleans Avenue, from New Metairie road through City Park to the lake, 2d dist.

Otaheite, 4th n. of Claiborne, from Lower Line to Foucherville, 6th dist.

Ours Avenue (now Calhoun avenue), 3d dist.

Pacanier (now Chippewa) 4th dist.

Pacific Avenue, 3d w. of Opelousas R. R., from river s. to boundary line of Jefferson Parish, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Painters, 7th e. of Elysian Fields, from Lafayette avenue to lake, 3d dist.

Palmyra, 2d s. of Canal, from Claiborne w. to cemeteries, 1st dist.

Paris Avenue. 8th e. of and parallel to Bayou St. John, from St. Bernard avenue to the lake, 3d district.

Patriots, 22d n. of Esplanade, from Bayou St. John to Lower Line, 3d dist.

Patterson, or Public road, 1st s. of river, from Canal street Ferry landing e. to limits, 5th dist.

Peace, or Kerlerec, 1st n. of Esplanade, from Chartres w. to Dauphin, 3d dist.

Pauline, 13th e. of Lafayette avenue, from river n. to woods, 3d dist.

Pearl, bet. Peters and Tchoupitoulas, from Delord to Calliope, 1st dist.

Pearl, 1st s. of and parallel to First, from Levee to Levee Line, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Pelopidas, 7th s. of and parallel to Monroe avenue, from Bayou St. John to Lafayette avenue.

Peniston, 7th s. of Toledano, from river n. to Claiborne, 6th dist.

Penn, 1st w. of Baronne, from Perdido s. to Poydras, 1st dist.

Penn, 12th s. of Patterson, from Hancock e. to limits, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Psnsacola Landing, head of New Basin and parallel with Rampart, 1st dist.

People's Avenue, 4th e. of and parallel with Franklin avenue, from Lafayette avenue to the lake, Milneburg,

Perdido, 4th s. of Canal, from St. Charles w. to New Canal, 1st dist.

Periander, 4th s. of Americus, from river e. to Hancock, McDonough.

Perrier, 3d s. of St. Charles, from Amelia w. to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Perilliat, between Lafayette and Cypress, fronting City Workhouse, from Liberty w. to Magnolia, 1st dist.

Perry, 2d s. of Americus, from river e. to Hancock, 5th dist.

Peter, 2d s. of Canal street ferry landing, from river to Sumner, 5th dist.

Peters, 6th dist. (now Prieur).

Peters, (now South Peters) formerly New Levee, 5th w. of river, from Canal s. to Felicity, 1st and 4th dists.

Peters, (now North Peters), 4th w. of river, (formerly New Levee), from Canal to St. Louis, 2d dist., intersected and recommences at Dumaine, and recommences numbering at Ursulines ; from thence n. (formerly Levee), along river bank to lower limits, 2d and 3d dists.

Peters Avenue, 13th sw. of Napoleon avenue, from river n. to woods, 6th dist.

Petre, 8th e. of Adams, from La Force n. to woods, 3rd dist.

Philip, 5th sw. of Felicity, f-om river to Claiborne, 4th dist.

Philip, n. of and parallel to Live Oaks, from South Line to North Line, 7th dist. (Carrollton),

Phillippa, 1st dist. (now Dryades).

Piety, 8th e. of Lafayette avenue, from the river n, to woods, 3d dists

Pine, 1st dist- (now Freret),

Pine (formerly Locust), 1st e. of Lower Line, Carrollton, from river n. to woods, 6th dist.

Pitt, 1st se. of St. Charles, from Amelia w. to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Plaquemine (now Coliseum).

Plauche (now Marais).

Pleasant, 1st e. of Toledano, from river nw. to St. Charles, 4th dist.

Place d'Armes, hetw. Rampart and St. Claude, St. Peter and St. Anne, 2d dist.

Pleasure, 4th n. of Fair grounds, from Bayou St. John e. to lower limits, 3d dist.

Plum, 7th n. of and parallel to First, from Lower Line to Upper Line.

Poet (now Washington), 3d dist.

Poyeparre, bet. Delord and Calliope, from Tchoupitoulas to Camp, 1st dist.

Poland, 1st e. of Lafayette avenue, from river n. to woods, 3d dist.

Polk Avenue, 11th n. of City Park, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

Polymnia, 2d n. of Felicity, from Camp w. to Rampart, 1st dist.

Poltmnia, 2d sw. of Terpsichore, from Broad ne. to St. John avenue, 6th dist.

Pope, commences at Lafayette avenue, cor. Virginius, and runs n. to the lake, 3d dist.

Port, all along Bayou St. John, from Carondelet walk to Esplanade, 2d dist.

Port, 1st e. of Lafayette avenue, from river n. to woods, 3d dist.

Powder, 2d from Canal street Ferry landing, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Potdras, 6th e. of Canal, from river w. to New Canal, 1st dist.

Preaux, 4th e. of Bayou St. John, from Pleasure n. to the lake, 3d dist.

Pressburg, 2d n. of Calhoun avenue, from Lafayette avenue w. to Bayou St. John, 3d dist.

Press (formerly Cotton Press), 3d e. of Lafayette avenue, from river n. to woods, 3d dist.

Preston, 3d n. of river, from Peters avenue, w. to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Prieur (now South Prieur), 3d w. of Claiborne, from Canal s. to Calhoun, 1st, 4th, and 6th dists.

Prieur (now North Prieur), 3d w. of Claiborne, from Canal n. to St. Bernard avenue, thence e. to Lafayette avenue, 3d dist.

Pritchard (see Brickyard) 3d dist.

Princhard, n. of and parallel to Twelfth, from Lower line to Upper line, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Pkttania, 1st e. of St. Charles, from Delord, 1st dist., sw. to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Ptolemy, 12th s. of Canal street Ferry landing, from river e. to limits, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Pulaski, bet. Jackson and Philip, from St. Charles to Carondelet, 4th dist.

Public Road, along bank of river from Lower line to Upper line, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Rampart (now North Rampart), 13th w. of river, from Canal n. to Columbus, thence e. to lower limits, 3d dist.

Rampart (now South Rampart), 13th w. of river,'from Canal s. to Toledano, 4th dist., thence to State, 6th dist.

Reede, commences at Lafayette avenue, cor. Livingston, and runs n. to the lake, 3d dist.

Religious, 4th w. of river, from Robin, 1st dist. s. to St. Andrew, 4th dist.

Rendon (now South Rendon), 6th w. of Broad, from Canal s. to Peters avenue, 6th dist.

Rendon (now North Rendon, formerly Second), 6th w. of Broad, from Canal n. to Esplanade, 2d dist.

Reynes, 3d e. of Convent of the Ursulines, from river n. to woods, 3d dist.

Richard, 14th s. of St. Joseph, from river w. to Camp, 1st dist.

Richelieu, 4th n. of Fair Grounds, from St. Bernard avenue to Bayou St. John, 3d dist.

Ridgeley, 13th s. of the lake, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

Ringold, 12th n. of City Park, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

Robert, 7th w. of Napoleon avenue, from river n. to woods, 6th dist.

Robertson (now North Robertson), 6th w. of Rampart, from Canal n. to St= Bernard avenue, thence e. to limits, 3d district,

Robertson (now South Robertson), 6th w. of Rampart, from Canal s. to Common, 1st dist.

Robin, 10th s. of St. Joseph, from river w. to Camp, 1st dist.

Rocheblave (now North Rocheblave), 8th w. of Claiborne, from Canal n. to St. Bernard avenue, 3d dist.

Rocheblave (now South Rocheblave), 8th w. of Claiborne, from Canal s. to Napoleon avenue, 6th dist.

Roman (now North Roman), 2d w. of Claiborne, from Canal n. to St. Bernard avenue thence e. to Lafayette avenue, 3d dist.

Roman (now South Roman), 2d w. of Claiborne, from Canal s. to Upper line, 6th dist.

Rose, n. of and parallel to Washington, from Lower Line to Foucher, boundary, Greenville, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Ross (now Boree), 11th n. of St. Charles, from Walnut w. to Lower Line, 6th dist.

Rossiere, 4th nw. of Broad, from St. Bernard avenue to Gentilly road, 3d dist.

Rossini, commences at Lafayette avenue, cor. Mithra, and runs n. to lake, 3d dist.

Royal, 8th w. of river, from Canal n. to Kerlerec, thence e. to Lower Line, 3d dist.

Rosseau, 3d w. of river, from Felicity to Washington avenue, 4th dist.

Salcedo (now South Salcedo), 4th w. of Broad, from Canal s. to Upper Line, 6th dist.

Salcedo (now North Salcedo), 4th w. of Broad, from Canal n. to Esplanade, 2d dist.

Salomon, 1st w. of Lafayette avenue, from Columbia n. to the lake, 3d dist.

Sauvage, from Fair Grounds to Marigny avenue, 3d dist.

Sauvb, 12th n. of St. Charles, from Walnut w. to Lower Line, 6th dist.

Sauve, n. of and parallel to Washington, from Lower Line to Foucher, boundary Greenville, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Scott. 1st n. of Taylor avenue, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

Second, 9th sw. of Felicity, from river nw. to Broac', 4th dist.

Second, n. of and parallel to First, from Foucher boundary, Greenville to Jefferson, 7th dist (Carrollton).

Seguin, 2d e. of Canal street Ferry Landing, from landing se. to Market, 5th dist.

Sere, 21 n. of Esplanade, from Bayou St. John to Lafayette avenue, 3d dist.

Seventeenth, 14th n. of and parallel to Mobile, from Canal avenue to North Line, -7th dist. (Carrollton).

Seventh, 2d w. Washington avenue, from river nw. to Magnolia, 4th dist.

Seventh, n. of and parallel to First, from Lower Line to Upper Line, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Shakspeare, commences at Monroe avenue, corner Lafayette avenue, and runs n. to the lake, 3d dist.

Shell Road, along bank of New Canal, from Delord to lake, 1st dist.

Sixth, 1st s. of Washington avenue, from river nw. to Claiborne, 4th dist.

Sixth, 10th n. of and parallel to First; from Lower Line to Upper Line, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Socrates, 2d n. of Monroe avenue, from Lafayette avenue w. to Bayou St. John, 3d dist.

Socrates, 11th s. of Canal street Ferry Landing, from river e. to Sumner, 5th dist.

Solidelle, 2d n. of Claiborne, from Lafayette avenue e. to lower limits, 3rd dist.

Solis (now Locus), 4th dist.

Solomon, 8th w. of Hasan avenue, from Canal s. to New Canal, 1st dist.

Solomon, 8th w. of Hagau avenue, from Canal n. to New Metairie road, thence north to May, 2d dist.

Solon, 8th s. of and parallel to Monroe avenue, from Bayou St. John to Lafayette avenue, 3d dist.

Solon, 10th s. of Americus, from Jefferson e. to Hancock, 5th dist. Soniat, 8th sw. of Napoleon avenue, from river n. to Claiborne, 6th dist. Soraparu, bet, Philip and First, from river n, to Annunciation, 4th dist.

Soule, 4th n. of Claiborne, from Upper Line to Bloomi gdale, 6th dist.

South, all streets crossing Canal street, and numbering both directions from it (those running south).

South, south side of Lafayette square, from Camp to St. Charles, 1st dist.

South Market, bet. Market and Richard, from river w. to Tchoupitoulas, 1st dist.

Spain, 3d e. of Elysian Fields, from river to woods, 3d dist.

St. Adeline, 2d nw. of Claiborne, from Common s. to Poydras, 1st dist.

St. Andrew, 2d s. of Felicity, from river w. to Claiborne, 4th dist.

St. Ann, 8th n. of Canal, from river w. to Metairie road, thence north to the lake, 2d dist.

St. Anthont, 4th ne. of Esplanade, from Eampart n. to lake, 3d dist.

St. Anthony Place, Royal, between St. Peter and St. Ann, 2d dist.

St. Bartholomew, now Erato.

St. Bernard, 6th w. of Pontchartrain R. R., from St. Bernard avenue to the lake, 3d dist.

St. Bernard Avenue, 3d e. of Esplanade, from St. Claude nw. to Bayou St. John, 3d dist.

St. Charles, 8th w. of river, from Canal s. to Upper Line, thence w. to Lower Line Carroltor, 1st, 4th and 6th dists.

St. Claude (formerly Good Children), 1st w. and n. of Rampart, from Carondelet walk, 2d dist. n. to St. Bernard avenue, thence e. to Lower Line, 3d dist.

St. David, 6th w. of St. Charles, from Philip se. to Calhoun, 4th and 6th dists.

St. DENis, now Rampart.

St. Ferdinand, 2d e. of Lafayette avenue, from river n. to lake, 3d dist.

St. Francis, now Church, 1st dist.

St. George, 4th w. of Rampart, from First, 4th dist. sw. to Lower Line, 6th dist.

St. James, 16th s. of St. Joseph, from river nw. to Felicity, 1st dist.

St. James, 1st dist., now Pierce.

St. James, 6th w. of Hagan avenue, from Canal n. to St. Ann, 2d dist.

St. John, from junction of Esplanade aud Broad w. to Bayou St. John, 2d dist.

St. John's Avenue, 7th w. of Broad, from New Canal w. to Peters avenue, 6th dist.

St. John Grand Route (see Grand Route St John).

St. Joseph, 8th s. of Canal, from river w. to Dryades, 1st dist.

St. Mary, 1st dist., now Locust.

St. Mary. 1st s. of Felicity, from river w. to Carondelet, 4th dist.

St. Patrick, 13th w. of Hagan avenue, from Canal s. to New Canal, 1st dist.

St. Patrick, 13th w. of Hagan avenue, from Canal n. to Metairie road, 2d dist.

St. Patrick, 5th nw. of St. Charles, from Toledano sw. to Calhoun. 6th dist.

St. Peter, 6th n. of Canal, from river w. to New Metairie road, thence n. to the lake, 2d dist.

St. Philip, 10th n. of Canal, from river w. to New Metairie road, thence n. to May, 2d dist.

St. Theresa, 4th s. of Calliope, from Tchoupitoulas to St. Thomas, 1st dist.

St. Thomas, 5th w. of river, from Gaiennie, 1st dist., to Toledano, 4th dist.

State, 13th w. of Upper Line, from river n. to woods, 6th dist.

Stephanis, ne. of and parallel to 16th, Foucher boundary to North Line.

Stephen Girard, 5th s. of and parallel to Monroe avenue, from Bayou St. John to Lafayette avenue, 3d dist.

Story, 15th n. of St. Charles, from Upper Line w. to Calhoun, 6th dist.

Sturken's Alley, bet. Conti and St Louis, from Liberty to Marais, 2d dist.

Sumner, 7th w. of Opelousas R.R., from river s. to limits, 5th dist. (Algiers.)

Suzette, now Erato, 1st dist.

Swamp, 1st w. of Bayou Sauvage, from Grande Route St. John n. to Pleasure, 3d dist.

Taylor Avenue, 6th n. of City Park, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

Tchoupitoulas, 6th w. of river, from Canal s. to Joseph, 4th and 6th dists,

picture2

Telemachus (now North Telemachus), 3d w. of Hagan avenue, from Canal n. to Bayou St. John, 2d dist.

Telemachus (now South Telemachus), 3d w. of Hagan avenue, from Canal s. to New Canal, 1st dist.

Tennessee, 1st e. of Convent of the Ursulines, from river n. to woods, 3d dist.

Tenth (now Mobile), ne. of and parallel to First, from Foucher, boundary to Upper Line, 7th dist (Carrollton).

Terpsichore, 9th s. of St. Joseph, from river w. to Freret, 4th dist.

Terpsichore, 1st s. of Melpomene, from Broad s. to St. John's avenue, 6th dist.

Thalia (formerly Benjamin and Estelle), 6th s. of St. Joseph, from river w. to limits, :Lstdist.

Thatre, 2d s. of Patterson, from Thayre avenue e. to Opelousas R. R., 5th dist.

Theresa, 1st n. of Terpsichore, from Tchoupitoulas to St. Thomas, 1st dist. ' Third ; 6th s. of Felicity, from river nw. to Broad, 4th dist.

Third, ne. of and parallel to First, from Foucher, boundary to Monroe, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Thirteenth, ne. of and parallel to Princhard, from Foucher, boundary, to Upper Line, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Thompson (now Pacific avenue), Algiers.

Timoleon, 1st n. of Monroe avenue, from Lafayette avenue w. to Bayou St. John, 3d dist. / Tivoli Circle, junction of St. Charles and Delord, 1st dist. (now Lee Circle).

Toledano, dividing 4th and 6th dists., from river nw. to limits.

Tonti (now North Tonti), 7th w. of Claiborne, from Canal n. to St. Bernard avenue, 2d and ^3d dists,

Tonte (now South Tonti), 7th w. of Claiborne, from Canal s. to Calhoun, 1st, 4th and 6th tdists.

^Toulouse, 5th n. of Canal, from river w. to New Metairie road, thence n. to May, 2d dist.

Treme (now Liberty), j* Triangle, 1st s. of Delord, from Front to Peters, 1st dist.

Tricou, 3d w. of U. S. Barracks, from river n. to woods, 3d dist.

Twelfth, 4th ne. of and parallel to Mobile, Foucher, boundary, to Upper Line, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Twentieth, ne. of and parallel to Stephania, from Hamilton to parish boundary, 7th dist. fCarrollton).

'JTwiggs, 14th s. of the lake, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

Ulloa, 6th s. of Canal, from Genois w. to New Canal, 1st dist.

Union, 2d e. of Elysian Fields, from junction of Royal and Kerlerec n. to lake, 3d dist.

U. S. Barracks, or Jackson Barracks, near lower city limits, 3d dist.

Ushversitt Place, Dryades, bet. Canal and Common, 1st dist.

Upper Line, 6th w. of Napoleon avenue, from river n. to Broad, 6th dist.

Upper Line, divides Carrollton and New Carrollton, from river to Edinburgh, 7th dist. (Caxrollton).

Urania, 1st n. of Felicity, continuation of Orange, from Camp to Felicity, 1st dist.

Urania, 4th s. of Melpomene, from Broad w. to St. John's avenue, 6th dist.

Urquhart, 2d n. of St. Claude, from St. Bernard avenue e. to lower limits, 3d dist.

Ursulines, 11th n. of Canal, from river w. to New Metairie road, thence north to May, 2d dist.

Valence, 3d sw. of Napoleon avenue, from river n. to Clara, 6th dist.

Valette, 6th e. of Canal street ferry landing, from river s. to boundary line, 5th dist.

Valmont, 5th w. of Upper Line, from river n. to Chestnut.

Varieties Place, between Carondelet and Baronne, from Commas to Gxavier. 1st dls*:

Verret Avenue, 1st w. of Opelousas R. R., from rivers, to limits, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Verret, 5th e. of Canal street ferry landing, from river to Lapeyrouse, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Vicksburg, bet. Bienville and Conti, from New Metairie road to the lake, 3d dist.

Victory (now Decatur).

"Vienna, 3d n. of Calhoun avenue, from Lafayette avenue w. to Bayou St. John, 3d dist.

Villere, 1st s. of Canal street ferry landing, from Seguin ne. to Verret, 5th dist.

Virginia, bet. the cemeteries and New Orleans Canal, 1st dist.

Virginitjs, 3d s. of Monroe avenue, from Lafayette avenue w. to Bayou St. John, 3d dist.

Virtue, 8th n. of Claiborne, from St. Bernard avenue e. to lower limits, 3d dist.

Walker, 9th s. of the Lake, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

"Wall. 7th sw. of and parallel to First, from Lower Line to Millaudon, 7th dist. (Carrollton).

Walnut, 4th e. of Lower Line, from river n. to woods, 6th dist.

Wandorf, 10 n. of St. Charles, from Walnut w. to Lower Line, 6th dist.

Wapping, 9th n. of St, Charles, from Walnut w. to Lower Line, 6th dist.

Warren, 8th n. of St. Charles, from Walnut w. to Lower Line, 6th dist.

Warsaw, 7th n. of St, Charles, from Walnut w. to Lower Line, 6th dist.

Washington, 5th w. of Opelousas R. R., from river s. to woods, 5th dist. (Algiers).

Washington, 1st n. of St. Charles, from Walnut w. to Lower Line, 6Ji dist.

Washington, 1st n. of Esplanade, from Broad w. to Bayou St. John, 3d to 2d dist.

Washington (formerly Poet), 4th e. of Elysian Fields, from Decatur n. to Lake, 3d dist.

Washington, 2d se. of and parallel to Canal avenue, from river to Sixteenth, 7th dist. (Algiers).

Washington Avenue, 12th sw. of Felicity, from river n w. to Broad. 4th dist.

Water (now North Water), fronting the river from Canal n. to Bienville, 2d dist.

Water (now South Water), fronting the river from Canal s. to Race, 1st dist.

Water, 2d n. of river, from Walnut w. to Pine, 6th dist.

Water, 1st. from the river, from Joseph to Bordeaux, 6th dist.

Webster Avenue, 4th w. of Opelousas R. R., from river s. to limits, 5th dist.

Webster, 7th w. of Peters avenue, from river n. to St. Charles, 6th dist.

Wells, 2d w. of river, from Canal to Bienville, 2d dist.

White (now North White), 1st w. of Broad, from Canal n. to Grande Route St. John, 2d and 3d dists.

White, 1st and 4th dists. (now Basin).

White (now South White), 1st w. of Broad, from Canal s. to New Canal, 1st dist.

William. 1st e. of Adams, from Liberal n. to woods, 3d dist.

Willow, 9th w. of Rampart, from Common s. to Upper Line. 6th dist.

Withers Alley, bet, Gaiennie and Erato, from Front to Peters, 1st dist.

Worth, 7th s. of the Lake, from Bayou St. John to Milne, 2d dist.

Zempel, n. of and parallel to Third, from Lower Line to Eagle.

CHAPTER VII.—SIGHTS ABOUT TOWN.

THE INTERESTING FEATURES OF NEW ORLEANS—ROMANTIC AND HISTORICAL EDIFICES— THE CHIEF CHURCHES AND OTHER PUBLIC BUILDINGS.

Most visitors to New Orleans imagine that they have "done " the city when they have seen the carnival, been to the lake, had the proverbial fish dinner, been to the Metairie cemetery, to Carrollton, to the Jockey Club, and to the French market. This is a great error. There is no city, presenting more interesting sights, but these are seldom visited, particularly in the French quarter of the town. There, odd little balconies and galleries jut out from the tall, dingy t wrinkled houses, peering into each other's faces as if in eternal confab. There, queer little' shops are to be found, apothecaries' and musty stores where old furniture, brasses, bronzes and books are sold, bird stores innumerable, where alligators are to be purchased as well—all these lying in a sort of half doze.

A tour through any of these streets will bring before one sights to be found nowhere else in the world.

Chartres street is very picturesque, not merely to walk along, keeping your gaze at a level; but to halt and look up the street and down, at the oddly furnished galleries that look as if the rooms had come out to see what the neighbors were after. And one must halt and peer into doorways, even slyly penetrating a yard or so'into some of the long, dark tunnel entrances in search of the paved court-yards, with arched piazzas or porticoes, such as one may see in Venice under the shadows of St. Mark's.

The inhabitants of the grim houses are very kind ; they will see the stranger peering out of your eyes, the curious admiration, and will smile graciously, and with a prettily mingled air of graciousness and reserve motion you to look your fill. In most of these court-yards you will find plants in huge pots, pomegranate trees, flowering shrubs; sometimes you will see a battered bronze statue, or a marble figure, gone as gray as any old Creole darkey that smiles a "bon jour " to you from the banquette. And you will see great yellow and earthen water-jars, the ones in which the " Forty Thieves " were hid on a memorable occasion, but which have been transported into Frenchtown and numerously duplicated. These huge jars add much to the charm of the soggy court-yards.

There is nothing really of note to detain one in Chartres street until the old Cathedral is reached. It stands between two of the most picturesque buildings in New Orleans—the old court-houses, built a little before the birth of the present century by Don Andreas Almonaster, a Spanish noble, the old histories of the town say, and who was also perpetual regidor. Those buildings with their dormer windows and stuccoed balustrades " peeling off for their final plunge into oblivion " have looked down on many an execution in the Place d'Armes, which has been called " Jackson Square " ever since the General's statue was erected under the orange and ban°na trees of the sweet old garden.

An old lady who lived for a long time in the old Pontalba Buildings that are drawn up like twin regiments of French soldiers on either side the square, says she can remember a day when three pirates were hung in the Square. She is old and gray and wears time's white snows wreathed on her gentle brows ; may be she can remember such a scene.

In the " Cathedral of St. Louis " a number of persons lie buried. Pere Antoine, whom the same old history of the town calls a good and benevolent and saintly man, died in 1829; and during the forty or fifty years he lived in New Orleans he must have baptized, married and buried two-thirds of the persons who were born, married and who died in that time. -Only a phnvt tiro^ ago the gray stones were torn up by the r r 'Ot=. and the form of Archbishop Perche

was buried away under the great altar. A marble angel broods over the top of this altar. The huge yellow cross her arms embrace is said to be all of true, pure gold. A narrow paved alleyway runs down by the high Cathedral walls from Chartres street through to Royal.

Tall, many-storied houses look down on the alley, which is named after blessed St. Antoine, and the sweet, screen garden that blossoms and grows behind the church. The balconies are hidden behind lattice work, and behind the lattices the priests who belong to the cathedral live their simple, frugal lives. Their homes are plain, their fare is scanty, their lives austere. It is pretty and pathetic to note how these men cultivate and care for the pots and boxes of flowers that grow on their galleries.

Two or three blocks further down Chartres street, one comes to a garden wall, dingy at:d dark, that is set up close beside the small St. Mary's Church. Behind the wall is'he present Archiepiscopal Palace. Here lives the Archbishop ; his life is almost as hard as that of a Carmelite, and the old Palace seems never to have drawn a dry breath since its walls, three feet thick they are, were mortared into place. This used to be the Ursuline Convent, and was occupied thus for nearly a century. The nuns moved from it in 1824. The doorkeeper at the Palace is a trifle crusty, as all good sentinels ought to be, but visitors can gain admittance and look through the curious old place with its cells and refectories and sunken stone stairways. with balustrades of iron that are worn thin and shadowy by the touch of vanished hands.

Visitors should ask for Father Rouquette, one of the gentlest priests and best of men, and a most exquisite writer in his own language, the French. He is a missionary to the Indians, and lives most of his time with them in the tangled woods of St. Tammany, or when at the Palace they come from across the Lake waters and talk with him, squatting on the dusty floor of his bare little room.

One can step from the Palace right into "St. Mary's Chapel," where the Archbishop often holds service. Up over the altar of this chapel, one of the oldest in the town, is a doorway hung with dark curtains, and many times the worshippers in the church have seen the wan. sweet face of the old Archbishop, he who died the other day, looking down on them from between the parted curtains, as with lifted hand he sent his benedictions on their bent heads. Here in this chapel the Archbishop's body lay in state for nearly a week.

Now, if you will go around Hospital to Royal street, you will find on the corner an immense house, which is a fine sample of the former elegance of the houses of the wealthy people of New Orleans. It is rich with carvings; richer in associations. It has been lived in by great men. There is one room in which Louis Phillippe has slept, Lafayette and Marechal Ney. From the observatory one gets the finest view of the lower part of the city, for it is the highest point in Frenchtown, excepting of course, the Cathedral towers.

Turning down Royal street toward Canal, one finds much that is charming. One should look up and note how fond the old architects were of exterior decoration, for the white cornices up under the eaves are generally richly carved. Many of these houses have entre sols— that is a sort of half--tory between the first and second floor; and tiny windows with carved stone or wooden balustrades, are sunk into the walls across the window space.

In fact, there is nothing in Frenchtown more noteworthy than the windows of the houses. They are round, peaked, mere little rod-barred holes in the wall, gashes ; they are filled with panes of stained glass, with dozens of tiny panes, with doors half of wood the rest of glass, with lattice work, or broad, flat jalousies, once painted green ; they are any and all of these, and are any and everything except the modern conventional windows of the architecture of 1884.

Rooms are to be rented in many of these houses, as the dangling sign, " Chambres a louer," let down by a bit of string from one of the upper galleries, will inform you.

There is one fine house on Royal street not very far from Hospital. The entrance is a very wide alley, oool and refreshing, with the stout gaie* uf solid wood aJways standing wide open. The flags avp ^icvays r]pftn. Thp «tone walls are painted, with <wi..>= <?•' ray^ brown and QQ<^|

green over the rest of the space. A tiny little yellow stream of Mississippi water—Madame Delicieuse might have arched her dainty instep over it—flows always close by the wall, over the flags. It makes a little rushing musical sound as it washes into the stone at the end of the alleyway. And out of sight of the street a broad flight of stairs lead up into a beautiful and elegant home. From the street one sees enticing green plants and the gray iron tank of a tinkling fountain that sends a thin stream of water in a needle-fine spray high into the air. A purple band along the garden walks shows how plentifully sweet violets grow. Little tufts of white moss-like blossom appear at intervals on the twigs of the sweet-olive plants, and the air is heavenly with delicious odors.

At 253 Eoyal street is the tiny cottage, with its bristling ridge of tiles on the comb of the roof, in which lived "Madame Delphine." On Dumaine street, between Eoyal and Chartres street, is the ragged house of M'me John. Cluttered-up galleries stand on the street, and the gray roof, like an overhanging brow, throws the wet sidewalk into shadow. Anything more decrepit cannot be imagined. One end of the gallery is littered with old tubs, stone water jars, more of the "Forty Thieves," broken boxes, all piled together. The battered weather-beaten sign of a sage femme now dangles from one of the shrunken green porch pillars.

In Toulouse street, near Royal, is the crumbled ruin of the old Citizens' Eank. The only deposit this bank has now is weeds, dirt, and vermin. It smells of bats ; it is rank with weeds. J.n the blaze of summer its ruined marble walls and broken roofs are illuminated by the great yellow, flaring bloom of the golden rod. The skeleton stalks of the last year's lamps dip in the wind now. Toads, rats, and weeds dispute for the front steps. Even tramps avoid seeking shelter in its gloomy ruins. Two or three odd little second-hand shops will be found in Toulouse street, near the bank.

Another place worthy of note is the Academy of the Bon Secours in Orleans street, between Eoyal and Bourbon. The little green garden of the Cathedral looks right out on this convent school. The front of the building jamb on the street is of pinkish color, and with its portico roof thrown over the sidewalk looks more like some grand hotel entrance or theatre front getting superannuated. On the corner of Bourbon and Orleans used to stand the gay old Orleans Theatre, and this convent was the dance house of the theatre, the ball and supper room, and in this building used to be given those famous "quadroon " balls.

The visitor will be startled when he rings at the convent bell, and the door opens in on that fine marble floor that has been in its time pressed by the satin-clad feet of so many sadly, fatally beautiful women, to find himself in the presence of a colored sister of charity. The famous dance hall for quadroon women has become a convent for colored sisters of charity.

The old Spanish barracks were located at 270 Eoyal street; there are but few traces of them left in the stone arches of the building now used for manufacturing purposes. One cannot but notice the dilapidated condition of those old houses that under the French and Spanish domination were somewhat famous. Tile roofs have begun to disappear, the cozy little cottage tenements of those who were here before Canal street existed are fast changing into the newer style of corniced residences ; and, in fact, on all sides, one, who is at all observant, can see how that fickle old fellow, Time, is pushing back the past to make way for the present.

It is true there are neighborhoods where his hand seems to have been stayed in a measure. Some of those old Creole houses whose roofs have sparkled and glittered in the spring showers of one hundred years still remain, but they are fast fading away. Curious old houses these. The very embodiment of the plain, simple, old-time ideas of what a Southern residence should be, where ample ventilation in summer and warmth in winter were the main objects of those earnest architects. Passing down Eoyal street and arriving at the corner of St. Peter, we see that at least one of the old notable houses of our city was not allowed to go into the sere and yellow without a remonstrance on the part of its owner. Three months ago it stood there, a tall Venetian looking four-story edifice of peculiar architecture

and more sombre appearance. Of a dull, faded, blue color, with splotches on its front like a convalescent small-pox patient, it gave evidence of its age, and showed how the weather of all these years had made its inroads on the once smooth stucco. Silent and rather forbidding it stood there, a gloomy reminder of days when prosperity and wealth made our city the Damascus of the South, whither the gay and rich voyaged for the nepenthe of revelry and pleasure. Many will recall the old swinging sign that creaked in the rough puffs of wind coming down St. Peter street from the river, and will recall the antique letters that announced to the world that "Jean Fisse, Grocer," in the corner store was ready to answer all calls upon his selected foreign stock. Poor John Fisse has gone to a better land, where it matters not whether a pound of butter be of light or heavy weight, and the plasterers and carpenters have lately taken the old sign down to make way for the new dress they were about to put upon the old building. A fresh coat of stucco has obliterated now all the work of weather, and the house stands in its new garb as bright and attractive as it did sixty years ago.

The reason we have called attention to this building, however, was not because of its recent repairs, but rather for the reason that it was the first four-story house built in New Orleans, and the laughable incidents connected with its building.

It was in the good old year of 1819, after peace had once more settled down upon us, and the Orleanais were no more looking out for the English, that it was erected. Here Sieur "George lived. The oldest house now standing is on St. Anne street, between Burgundy and Eampart. It is queer, more tumbled down, with a deeper-drooping roof than even M'me John's house. It stands back in a little garden, behind a fence, and was the home of the " Voudou Queen," Marie le Yeau, who, however, before she died turned from the superstitions of her life and died in the church.

On the corner of Conti and Rampart streets stands a brown church, which was, as a turbanned colored Frenchwoman will tell you, "billup in dat good Pere Antoine day." This was the old Mortuary Chapel. It was finished in 1827, and is dedicated to St. Anthony of Padua. All funeral ceremonies of Catholics were compelled to be performed there. The Mortuary Chapel is now the Italian Church of the city, in charge of a quiet and gentle priest, who lives in a beautiful one-storied cottage wiih a tiled roof, and stone floors, behind the church, and where his sweet and simple household is in charge of his two sisters, quiet, thin-faced ladies speaking no language but their own smooth, flowing Italian.

The furniture in the priest's house is composed mainly of old carved church benches, altar stalls, settees and chairs that have served their time in the church. This cottage home, like so many of the houses in this side of the city, has a roof that reaches far over the sidewalk beyond the house walls. A queer little green gallery railing juts out from one end of the house top, and one can fancy that sometimes the thin, brown, little priest and his quiet, thin, brown sisters go up there in the moonlight and talk half to each other, half to the white and silent stars of Bella Italia. There is a famous shrine in the Italian church—the shrine of St. Bartholomew—and about it are placed innumerable thank-offerings from those whose prayers have been answered.

Some of these offerings are curious, some beautiful ; among the former are waxen hands, arms, legs, feet, fingers, and under a glass globe is a head of a young boy, modeled in wax and faithfully colored. It was presented by the grateful mother of a sick lad, who long suffering with some illness in the head, was cured by the power of her prayers to St. Bartholomew. A statue of St. Bartholomew with his head in hand and skin over his arm—he was both flayed and beheaded—stands at one the side-altars.

Visitors should also see further up Rampart street the beautiful green Congo square, where long time ago Bras Coupe and other negroes danced and sung, and where the ladies and gentlemen used to go in early evening time to watch and listen to their strange, wild, weird amusement.

The Parish Prison lies just back of Congo square ; these buildings are very old. From the neighboring streets show the tall masts of schooners unloading sweet-scented burdens of pine and cypress trees, with the breath of the forests still exhaling from their dead hearts. This long arm of water, reaching and diving down into the heart of the city to pluck at its commerce, is the Old Basin.

The "marble room" in the Custom-House, the long or central room, with walls, ceiling, pillars, floor, all of marble, is one of the largest and handsomest rooms in a public building in the country, and is well worthy of a visit.

The old St. Louis Hotel, on St. Louis, Chartres and Royal streets (now known as Hotel Royale), should also be visited. The dome of this building is very fine and richly frescoed. It is adorned with allegorical pictures and busts of famous men, the work of Canova and Pinoli. This building was originally the Bourse of the city, and a fine hotel was combined with it. It afterwards became the State-House ; was dismantled, but is now restored.

Above Canal street, visitors should see the garden district, the houses being chiefly distinguished for the exquisite gardens in which they are placed. After a ride up in the Prytania street cars, one could leave the car at Jackson or Philip, and then walk about, weaving one's way in and out among the streets upon which there are no car tracks.

North of Canal street the handsomest residence street is Esplanade, upon which are situated some of the loveliest houses in the city.

On the south side of the town, or above Canal street, as it is locally Known, the handsomest houses lie between St. Charles avenue and the river.

The town headquarters of General Jackson were at 84 Royal street. The old battle-ground of 1815, in St. Bernard parish, is where the national cemetery—Chalmette—is now situated. It is two miles below the United States Barracks, and a lovely walk or drive in good weather. The old Jackson monument is on the battle-field. The road down is lined with old plantation houses.

As for the other interesting sights to be visited in New Orleans, either from the size and architecture, or on account of historical or other interest, there are innumerable, but the following are some of the most striking of them :

The Custom House— Situated on Canal street, between Decatur and Peters streets, from the top of which building a full view of the city can be had.

The United States Mint and Sub-Treasury— Located on Esplanade, cor. of North Peters street.

City Hall— Corner of St. Charles and Lafayette streets, contains the different municipal business rooms, treasurer's office, lyceum, Council chamber and library, etc. It is a large, commodious and handsome structure of brick, marble and stone. The front is of the Grecian Doric order, and remarkable for the graceful beauty of its stately columns.

The Parish Prisons— These edifices, which are three stories high and built of brick, at a cost of about $200,000, are situated between St. Ann and Orleans streets, occupying 123 feet on each, and a space of 139 feet between them. They are two in number, divided by a wide passageway. The main building has its principal entrance on Orleans street, which is closed by strong iron doors. The lower story is used as offices and the apartments of the jailor. The second and third stories are used for prisoners, and are divided into large rooms. The building is surmounted by a pavillion with an alarm bell.

Half-Way House— Situated just over the bridge at the intersection of Canal street and the New Canal, and accessible by the Canal street cars. In the near neighborhood are the Metairie, Greenwood, and other beautiful cemeteries.

New Orleans Cotton Exchange— Situated on Carondelet street, corner of Gravier, was inaugurated in February, 1871, with a roll of 100 members, which, after dwindling down to about eighty, increased, under a system of daily news concerning the staple, to upwards of 400. Its building is considered one of the handsomest edifices in the country.

West End, or New Lake End— One of the most frequented resorts on the shores of Lake Pontchartrain. It may be reached by the New Shell Road, a favorite drive, or by the steam trains of the New Orleans City Railroad Company.

Spanish Fort— This has always been a point of interest, owing to its historical associations, and may be reached by the New Orleans, Spanish Fort & Lake Railroad; depot, corner Canal and Basin streets.

Milneburg— Or, as it is more popularly known, the " Old Lake End," is the terminus of the Pontchartrain Railroad. It is directly on the banks of the Old Lake, and the cool air always prevailing, the sails, fishing and bathing to be enjoyed, make it a favorite resort with all who wish to enjoy the day away from the brick and mortar of the city.

United States Barracks— A trip to the barracks is one of of the pleasantest excursions in the neighborhood of New Orleans. The distance from Canal street is about three and three quarter miles, and the whole distance may be accomplished by the street cars at the expense of five cents each way. The buildings used by the French government and afterwards by the Federal authorities, as a barracks, were located on Chartres street, just below the present residence of the Archbishop.

Carrollton Gardens— The trip to Carrollton is deservedly one of the most popular excursions in the neighborhood of our city. The green cars from the corner of Canal and Baronne streets take passengers through one of the pleasantest avenues, lined by palatial residences and smiling gardens to that suburban district of New Orleans. Here are situated the Carrollton Gardens, a favorite resort, and a place much admired by strangers. The spacious walks are lined with the choicest flowers, whose bloom and fragrance are especially attractive to those who come from the North.

Cemeteries— Firemens', one of the Metairie ridge cemeteries, at the end of Canal street, contains a monument of Irad Ferry, the first fireman of this city who was killed while discharging his duty at a fire ; the society tombs of many of the fire companies, and other beautiful crypts.

Greenwood, at the end of Canal street. Here is located the Confederate monument, erected by the ladies of New Orleans.

Metairie Ridge, at the head of Canal street, across the canal. This burial-ground has been laid out but a few years, yet contains many fine tombs and splendid walks and drives. The monument of Stonewall Jackson, and the one of the famous " Battalion Washington Artillery," are greatly admired.

Old St. Louis, on Basin, between Conti and St. Louis streets. It contains many beautiful tombs, and is the oldest cemetery in the city.

St. Louis, Nos. 1, 2 and 3, on Claiborne, between Customhouse and St. Louis streets, contain some magnificent mausoleums. No. 2 holds the monument of John Milne, '"The Friend of the Orphan." No. 1 is for colored persons.

The Protestant, Girod street, at the foot of Girod street, on Liberty. It is the oldest Protestant burial ground in the city, and has many fine tombs.

Chalmette, the national cemetery, is in charge of the quartermaster's department, United States army. This beautiful resting-place of the dead is situated on the left bank of the Mississippi River, a little over one mile below the Jackson barracks. The ground was donated by the city in 1865, and was laid out by Capt. Chas. Barnard. There are 12,192 graves; 6,913 of these are classed as "Known," and 5,279 are marked " Unknown."

Washington, corner of Prytania street and Washington avenue, contains many beautiful souvenirs of the Confederate dead, and the monument erected by the people of Louisiana in memory of Governor Henry W. Allen.

Churches— Christ Church, the pioneer of Protestant churches in New Orleans, is situated on the corner of Canal and Dauphine streets, facing on Canal, and is one of the most imposing and elegant structures in the city. It is built of brick, stuccoed and painted to imitate stone,

and is of the Gothic style in architecture. Approaching the city from any direction, the tall, graceful spire of this edifice is among the first to meet the eye.

McGehee Church, Methodist Episcopal—The first church belonging to this congregation was situated at the corner of Poydras and Carondelet streets, but fell in the disastrous fire of January, 1851. Almost immediately after its destmction, the work of erecting its successor commenced, and soon this beautiful structure was completed. The McGehee church, located on Carondelet street, between Lafayette and Girod, a little south of the old church site, is of the Grecian Doric order, bold and original in design, combining great grandeur of beauty, with simplicity and elegance in arrangement. This is the oldest Methodist congregation in the city.

The First Presbyterian Church is a beautiful large Gothic structure, situated to the south of Lafayette square, on South street, between Camp and St. Charles. It is one of the most graceful and time-honored in our city. It is a brick edifice 75x90 feet and 42 feet to ceiling. The tower and steeple, from foundation to pinnacle, together measure 219 feet. The body of the church is admirably arranged, and capable of seating 1,311 persons. There are also lofty and commodious galleries on a level with the organ loft.

St. Alphonsus Church is situated on Constance street, between St. Andrew and Josephine streets, Fourth district, one square from the Jackson and Baronne street cars, and two from the Annunciation street line. It is built in the Renaissance style and is exceedingly spacious and elegant in design; 70 x 150 feet, and capable of seating 2,500 persons. The front is very beautiful, having two lofty towers.

The Canal Street Presbyterian Church is situated corner of Canal and Derbigny streets, and is a handsome frame building. It is very neatly finished, and will seat between four and five hundred person?. The seats are free.

Coliseum Place Baptist Church, situated at the corner of Camp and Terpsichore streets, facing Coliseum square, is a beautiful edifice, well located, aud has a very large congregation.

The Church of the Messiah, L'nitarian, which is one of the most elegant edifices of the kind in the city, was built, on St, Charles street, near Julia, in 1854-5, to replace the one formerly used by the congregation, which was destroyed by fire in 1851, and which was known as Dr. Clapp's church.

Dispersed of Judah, a beautiful synagogue on Carondelet street, between Julia and St. Joseph. It is the immediate successor of the oldest Jewish house of worship in New Orleans. The first temple, formerly a church edifice, corner of Canal and Bourbon streets, was presented to the congregation by the late Judah Touro in 1847.

Trinity Church, Episcopalian, corner of Jackson and Coliseum streets, Fourth District, is one of the most graceful buildings in the country, and noted far and wide for the chaste beauty of its adornments, particularly its beautiful chancel and chancel window.

Temple Sinai, Jewish, a graceful and most imposing structure, is situated on Carondelet, between Delord and Calliope streets, and is, without doubt, the most beautiful edifice of the kind in the United States, combining grandeur with simplicity so appropriately that the beholder is charmed.

St. John's Church is situated on Dryades street, between Clio and Calliope streets ; is built in the Renaissance style, and is of imposing grandeur and lofty proportions, 172 x 75 feet. The corner-stone was laid in October, 1869, and the church dedicated in January, 1872.

St. Patrick's Church, situated on Camp street, between Julia and Girod streets, is a triumph worthy of the genius of Gothic architecture, whether the dimensions or the splendor of the structure be considered. The style, taken from the famed York Minster Cathedral, is lofty and imposing, and is regarded as the finest effort in this style of architecture in the United States. It is built of brick, roughcast, and colored brown, giving the idea of uncut stone.

The Cathedral St. Louis, fronting on Jackson square, stands a link between the far past and the present time, an object alike of veneration and curiosity. This famous building is the third erected on the same site. The first cathedral, a wooden and adobe structure, was built

some time between the years 1718 (the date of the establishment of New Orleans) and 1723. In 1723 the fearful hurricane that swept over the city, spreading desolation in its path, destroyed "the cathedral and many other buildings of great worth and value."

The second edifice was built of brick about 1724 or 1725, and was the place where the worshipers gathered till 1788. On Good Friday, March 21, of that year, the sacred house was again destroyed, this time by fire. As in the former case, the cathedral fell amid the almost general ruin of the city, for the conflagration which reduced it to ashes destroyed nearly nine hundred houses, residences and public buildings, almost the entire city of New Orleans. For many months mass was celebrated in a temporary building erected for the purpose, and during this time no steps were taken toward the reconstruction of the church. To Don Andres Ahnon-aster y Roxas, a Spanish noble and colonel of the provincial troops, New Orleans is indebted for the resurrection of their favorite church, as at the personal expense of that gentleman the present massive structure was erected in 1794, as were also, a little later, the two buildings which stand one on either side of the cathedral, now occupied by courts, but originally intended for the use of the priests of this church of St. Louis. Sixty years afterwards his daughter, the Baroness Pontalba repaired and slightly altered the church, leaving it what it is to-day.

DRIVES.—The favorite drive for the majority of visitors is on the Shell road to the New Lake End, via Canal street.

Another most enjoyable drive is by Washington avenue, going up St. Charles street, passing Lee Place and some of the most palatial residences of the city, till the avenue is reached.

The route to Carrollton is directly up St. Charles street, through the pleasantest vicinities in the city. Another very pleasant drive to Carrollton is to follow St. Charles street as far as Napoleon avenue, through that street, and up the river bank.

One of the most rural in surroundings of New Orleans drives, is that over the old Metairie ridge road, out Canal street to the Half-way House, to the right, pass directly forward between the house and the Metairie cemetery, down to the bridge. Here take the road towards the city, which leads through beautiful scenes to the rear of and above Carrollton. Down the river bank to Napoleon avenue, thence to St Charles street.

Gentilly road.—Canal to Claiborne street, down that street to Esplanade, thence to Gentilly road and along the road for about three miles, passing the Fair Grounds and Jockey Club Park.

A most interesting drive is down the river bank passing immense cotton presses, all in full working order. The L'nited States Barracks and the Ursuline Convent can both be visited by this route. The student of history will naturally wish to visit the battle-ground, where glorious Old Hickory and his men achieved their victory. Chalmette is about five and three-quarter miles from Clay Statue, and a very pleasant method of reaching it is by a drive down the river bank.

Among the many ways of reaching the Fair Grounds is that of driving out Canal street to Broad, thence to Esplanade, and down the latter street to this delightful resort. Broad is a shell road, and is in excellent condition, while Esplanade is one of the most spacious and elegant avenues in the citv.

DISTANCES IN THE CITY.

With Clay Statue as the starting point, it is one mile, via St. Charles avenue, to Thalia street, two miles to Sixth street, three miles to Napoleon avenue, four miles to State street, four and one-half to Exposition Park, and five and one-fourth to Carrollton. Out Canal, it is one mile to Galvez, two miles to Genois, and three miles to the first of the cemeteries. The wharf is a half mile from the statue, and to the Metairie cemetery from the river is four miles. To the Barracks, is four and three-quarter miles. From Carrollton to the Barracks, by the cars, is ten miles; by the river, twelve miles: while by an air line it is only seven and three-quarter miles. St. Charles, with Royal street, is nine miles long.

CHAPTER VIII.— HOTEL LIFE.

RECOLLECTIONS OF ANCIENT HOSTELRIES—THE OLD ST. LOUIS AND ST. CHARLES—SOME IMPORTANT EVENTS THAT HAVE TAKEN PLACE IN THESE BUILDINGS.

Hotel life in New Orleans a half century ago was a feature of the city. In the early French days there had been no hotels, simply pensions. About the end of the last century, however, and when the Americans began pouring into New Orleans, hotels came into fashion. The Orleans Hotel on Chartres street was inaugurated as early as 1798, and others followed soon after; but these were scarcely hotels in the American sense of the word. They were houses built after the Creole fashion and with immense courts inside, on which all the rooms faced, but their capacity was small, measured by the standard of to-day. Several of these ancient hostelries are still to be seen, somewhat hoary but very little changed in appearance since they were furnished in the last century.

It was during the period between 1830 and 1840, " the flush times " of New Orleans, when it received its greatest increase in population and wealth, and during which nearly all its leading institutions were founded, and its important buildings erected, that the great hotels of New Orleans began. New Orleans can claim to have originated the American hotel—the caravansary, immense in size, gorgeous in its furnishing, and grand in its table d' hote, so different from anything to be found in Europe or any other country. The two old hotels of New Orleans, both with namesakes to day, but not equal to them in size or appointments—the St. Charles and St. Louis—were the two first great American hotels, antedating the celebrated Astor House of New York, one of the earliest buildings of that kind in the North.

The hotel life of New Orleans during the period immediately following the erection of these buildings, and down to the time of the war, was peculiarly bright, lively and attractive. New Orleans played to the rest of the South, the same part that Paris plays to France to-day. It was the capital, the city to where the planters of Louisiana, Mississippi and Arkansas, came during the winter season, to partake of its enjoyments. In those days, however, New Orleans was a mere place of residence, not a home, to many of its merchants who visited the city each winter to carry on their business, but left early in May, to avoid the summer. These people naturally preferred being in a hotel to renting a house. As a consequence the hotels were crowded all the time, and were the centres of social enjoyment. They were the commercial centres also, the exchanges of that day. Indeed, it was by this name that they were known : as the St. Charles Exchange, and the St. Louis Exchange. There was no cotton exchange then, no sugar exchange, and the merchants made the rotundas of these hotels their place of meeting to transact their ordinary business. They were the political centres of the State and of the South ; and parlor P, of the St. Charles Hotel, has probably witnessed more important political events than any room or any building in the country, outside of the Capitol at Washington.

Of the leading hotels of half a century ago, were the St. Charles, St. Louis and Verandah ; the last has disappeared altogether, not a vestige of it remains. The names of the other two were preserved for many years, but the buildings of to-day are quite different from the old ones, and are not, old residents of the city who knew their predecessors declare, half as fine or attractive.

THE ST. CHARLES.

" Set the St. Charles down in St, Petersburg and you would think it a palace ; in Boston, and ten to one you would christen it a college ; in London, and it would marvellously remind you of an exchange ; in New Orleans it is all three." Thus wrote of the St. Charles Hotel, more

than thirty years ago, a visitor from New York, a man who afterwards became mayor of that city, during the epoch of its greatest prosperity ; who at that time had enjoyed every opportunity of seeing and studying the public and private buildings of Manhattan, but who found down here, in the young city of New Orleans—for the First district was then a mere infant in point of years—something far grander than anything New York could then boast of.

Nor was Oakey Hall—for it is he from whom we quote—the only visitor who broke out into such warm, enthusiastic and rapturous admiration of the St. Charles. Lady Wortley, an English lady who had " done " Europe thoroughly, and was in search of something new and startling in America, pronounced the St. Charles a superb edifice, very similar to St. Peter's at Rome, and praises its "immense dome and Corinthian portico " as the finest piece of architecture she had seen anywhere in the New World.

Such praise as this sounds somewhat exaggerated and hyperbolical to-day. Nor should it be forgotten that the St. Charles of to-day differs somewhat from its predecessor—the building which Oakey Hall and Lady Wortley saw, admired and praised. The older building stood on the same site as the present one, it is true, and presented the same Grecian front—not quite as high, however—but was capped by a tall, snow-white cupola, second only in size and magnificence to the dome of the Capitol at Washington. This cupola was a favorite haunt for visitors, who, from its summit, could see the entire busy city, lying spread out, like a map, at their feet. The traveler journeying this way,w r hether steaming up the Mississippi or whirling cityward from Lake Pontchartrain. could distinguish this dome from afar, resplendent under the rays of a Southern sun, like Henry of Navarre's famous white plume at Ivry. It was visible indeed fully forty miles away ; was the first view the traveler got of the Crescent City, the last object that faded away in the dim horizon when cars or steamboats bade New Orleans adieu.

In every town there is some representative building whose career is in itself a history of the city it adorns and beautifies. Such is the Parthenon to Athens, Notre Dame to Paris, and St. Mark's to Venice. The representative building of old New Orleans, the city of Bienville and Carondelet, is the Cathedral, undoubtedly ; but of the modern or American city, the St. Charles Hotel. It was one of the first large buildings erected above Canal street, and from the day of its foundation it has shared the fortunes of the city, good and bad; prospered when it prospered ; suffered when it suffered. Within its walls half the business of the city was once transacted, and half the history of Louisiana made.

"The flush times" of New Orleans began about 1830, and continued, with a few interruptions, in the way of panics, crises, etc., until the beginning of the late w 7 ar. It was during the early part of this period that the faubourg Ste. Marie blossomed into the First district, the wealthiest portion of the city. The splendid buildings erected at that time were generally built by banking companies, who obtained charters from the Legislature and the right to issue money in return for the improvements they made. This policy had the double advantage of rapidly building up the city and increasing its banking capital. This capital amounted at one time to $40,000,000, when New York did not boast of half this amount.

Among the banks so created were the Improvements Bank, which erected the St. Louis Hotel, and the Exchange Bank, which built the St. Charles.

These two buildings were erected about the same time, and their erection grew out of the jealousy then existing between the city proper, occupied chiefly by the Creoles, and the faubourg Ste. Marie, or First municipabty, peopled by the Americans.

The old St. Charles or Exchange Hotel, as it was generally called, was commenced in the summer of 1835, costing $600,000 to build, in addition to the $100,000 paid for the ground. The St. Charles street front consisted of a projecting portico of six Corinthian columns, from which a flight of marble steps led to the hotel. The bar-room in the basement was as it is to-day, octagonal in shape, seventy feet in diameter and twenty feet high, having an exterior circle of Ionic columns. The architecture of this room was Ionic, and that of the saloon immediately over the ball room which was eighteen feet high, Corinthian. From the street a flight of marble steps led

to the lower saloon, at the summit of which was a handsome mar hie statue of Washington. From the saloon a grand spiral staircase continued up to the dome, with a gallery stretching around it on each of the upper stories. The dome was forty-six feet in diameter, surmounting an octagon building elevated upon an order of fluted columns. Above the dome was an elegant Corinthian turret. A circular room under the dome on the floor of which the spiral staircase terminated possessed a beautiful gallery, eleven feet wide, from which the whole city could be seen, at a height of 185 feet.

Diagonally opposite to the St. Charles, on the corner of St. Charles and Common, was the Veranda Hotel erected soon after, and which was for a time a tender or assistant to its greater neighbor. The Veranda was so called from being covered on its front toward the streets by a projecting roof and balcony which protected not only the inmates of the building, but also the pedestrians on the streets, from sun and rain.

The building was destined for a family hotel by its projector and builder, R. O. Pritchard, and was completed in May, 1838, at a cost of $300,000. The dining-room was one of the highest finished apartments in America, the ceiling being composed of three beautiful elliptic domes for chandeliers. The ceilings and walls were handsomely frescoed by Canova, nephew of the great Italian sculptor, and the building contained some handsome statuary.

The Veranda in the course of time fell under the same management as the St. Charles. It was destroyed by fire in 1853, soon after the old St. Charles, and never rebuilt, as a hotel.

The St. Charles was designed by Messrs. Dakin & Gallier (architects of the City Hall, the State House at Baton Rouge and the new Opera House), and cost nearly $800,000, a much larger amount, it must be remembered, than this sum represents to-day. It was completed at the beginning of 1837, and formally opened on Washington's birthday with a grand ball given by the Washington Guards, the crack military organization of the city then, under the command of C. F. Hozey, sheriff of the parish.

The St. Charles at once entered upon an era of prosperity. It is true that the first managers, Messrs. Gloyd & McDonald, failed; but they were soon succeeded by E. R. Mudge & Watrus, who made the hotel at once a success. Mr. Mudge sold out in 1845 to his brother, Col. S. H. Mudge, who "ran" the hotel in partnership with Wilson, an old clerk of the establishment, until the great fire of 1851 destroyed it.

The new hotel created quite a sensation throughout the country, and New Orleans was given the credit of being the most enterprising—it was already recognized as the most aristocratic—city in the United States. It must be remembered that this was before the Americans had become a hotel-building people. There were no Palmer Houses in those days, no Pacific Hotels, and visitors to our shores had to content themselves with the most ordinary of old-fashioned inns. The St. Charles was the first of the great hotels of the United States ; and it was some time before it found a rival in the Astor House of New York.

The St. Charles rapidly built up the First district. Around it, as a centre, all the traffic and business of the new city was transacted. Churches sprang up opposite it, and stores and dwelling-houses spread out in every direction. St. Charles street was at that time the brightest and liveliest street in America, probably in the world. Between Lafayette and Canal streets it boasted of forty-five bar-rooms, restaurants and eating-houses, and thus gained for the city the title it long enjoyed of the "Boarding-House of the United States." It was a standing joke that nothing but a bar-room or a restaurant could exist in that vicinity. One over-bold citizen did establish a literary exchange there, but before the year was out it boasted of a bar at least sixty feet long.

Hotel life in New Orleans then was something sui generis. There was a dash of excitement and Bohemianism about it that made it specially attractive. The First district boasted of few permanent residents, and its population was largely a floating one. People came to the city as to a new El Dorado to spend six months of the year, make as much money as possible, and then fly North or to Europe for a long summer's holiday The greater portion of the population slept

at the hotels or boarding-houses, and dined next morning at some of the thousand restaurants that New Orleans then contained, Day boarders at the hotels were of course numerous, and several hundred outsiders sat down at the tables of the St. Charles every day.

The large hotels of New Orleans were then three in number—the St. Charles, the St. Louis and the Verandah, the latter an offshoot of the St. Charles. Soon after the construction of that building a number of the gentlemen who had been most instrumental in its construction, among them J. H. Caldwell, E. A. Pritchard and Thomas Bank, quarreled with the board of managers, seceded from that body and built the Verandah (burned in 1853). Each of these hotels had its distinguishing feature. The Verandah was regarded as the cosiest and most homelike ; the St. Louis was the headquarters of the auctioneers and the place of great political meetings; the St. Charles was the place where merchants "most did congregate," although its rotunda was at the same time a great rendezvous for politicians, planters, ship captains and all the varied population of the then liveliest, most progressive and richest city in the United States. Thither flocked all the sugar and cotton planters of the South, bringing their families with them. And the merchants found the hotel the most convenient place at which to meet these planters and transact business with them. The result was that the rotunda of the St. Charles became the chamber of commerce, the board of brokers and the cotton exchange of the city.

The social life of that period was very gay, and the hotels were the centres of all this gaiety. Both the St. Charles and St. Louis gave weekly balls that were world-famous, and at which the very best people of New Orleans were to be met. Yellow fever epidemics did not frighten people then, and the hotels remained open from January to December, instead of being closed, as at present, four months in the year.

During the first few years the St. Charles met with but one reverse. The Exchange Bank, which built it, failed in the crisis of 1841, and the president and cashier fled in order to avoid arrest. The banking company having wound up its affairs, the hotel fell into the possession of the St. Charles Hotel Company, in whose hands it has remained ever since.

At about 11 o'clock on the morning of January 18th, 1851, the upper portion of the hotel was discovered to be on fire. The house was full of people at the time—the busiest season of the busiest year yet known here—800 guests had slept there the preceding night, Indeed so crowded was it that the proprietor had found it necessary to lease the St. Louis Hotel for those guests he could not accommodate in the St. Charles. The cause of this fire has never been definitely determined, some holding that a chimney caught fire and communicated the flames to the roof; others that it was caused by a stove used by some plumbers engaged in repairing the upper portion of the building. One point alone is certain—the fire began in the upper story, near the roof. The management of the fire department on this occasion was very bad. The fire was well under way before the bells were rung, and the engines which reached the scene, attracted there by the flames that lit up the entire city, were half manned and badly worked. The proprietor and employees of the hotel organized themselves into an efficient fire corps, and by the aid of their forcing pipes and engines kept a constant stream of water on the flames wherever they could be reached. It was useless. The fire was above the fifth story, and not an engine could reach half way to it.

After burning a half hour or so the front portico of the building fell forward with a mighty crash into the street, crushing in its fall the noble marble statue of Washington, executed by one one of the best artists in Italy, and presented by John Hagan, which stood at the main entrance

of the hotel.

The conflagration did not confine itself to the St. Charles. It spread thence to Dr. Clapp s Church, corner of Gravier and St. Charles, one of the very finest and oldest Protestant churches in the city, and entirely consumed it, The First Methodist Church, on Poydras, also fell a victim, and was completely destroyed within twenty minutes. The Pelican House, extending from Gravier to Union, and fourteen other buildings, some as far distant as Lafayette (then tt*>Hp> ^re*t, Tcherp fliey were fired by sparks from the hotel, were ?>o victims of the flames.

The total loss was a million dollars, the greater portion of which fell on the hotel, which was insured for the insignificant sum of $105,000, about one-seventh of its real value.

The loss was a severe one to the young city, but the men of those days did not despair easily. Within two days, the directors of the St. Charles Company had met and decided to rebuild the hotel. Work was begun in a few weeks, and within twelve months of the fire, a new building had risen from the ashes of the old one.

The new building was of the same style and architecture as the old one, with the exception of the cupola. The architect originally selected was Rogers (the w r ell-known hotel-builder of New York), but he had to leave before the completion of the building, and the work was then placed in the hands of Mr. Geo. Purves, builder, of this city. This building is substantially the one we see to day, the only material change being in the first stairs, which originally led straight down from the office instead of dividing and winding as they do at present. The new hotel was at once leased by Messrs. Hildreth & Hall, elegantly fitted up and opened for business in less than a year after the fire. Then followed a long era of prosperity for the State, the city and the hotel.

In the new St. Charles occurred many of those great political events in the stirring period between 1851 and 1861, which made history for the country and the world. It was in Parlor P, "so famous in history," that Jefferson Davis and a number of leading Southern politicians met on their way to the Charleston convention in 1860, and decided in caucus on the course they should pursue there, and probably laid the foundation for the gigantic strife between the States that followed so soon afterward.

When the war came on, the hotel was still under the management of Hildreth (afterward of the New York Hotel) & Hall, and was in very prosperous condition. It suffered, of course, from the hostilities, which interfered with and interrupted travel, and drove all visitors away.

In 1862, when New Orleans was occupied by the Federal forces, the course of the manager of the hotel in refusing Gen. Butler accommodations, came very near precipitating a serious disturbance on our streets. Mr. Hildreth, the lessee, was a Northern-born man, and a relative of Gen. Butler's wife, nie Hildreth, but was strongly Southern in his sympathies, and an active member of the Confederate Guards.

When Butler landed on May 2. he sent a messenger ahead to the hotel to ask for rooms for himself and his staff. He soon followed himself, accompanied by a large military guard. Mr. Hildreth firmly but emphatically declined to admit him to the building, announcing that he had shut up his hotel and was no longer keeping an inn. Butler thereupon demanded the keys, which were refused (him. In the meanwhile a large crowd of angry lookers-on had gathered in the St. Charles and the neighboring streets, who hooted at Butler and threatened him with personal violence. The crowd, growing still more excited, attempted to interfere with the officers, who were endeavoring to force their way into the building, but was finally dispersed and a number of them arrested.

Butler took refuge in the meantime down-stairs in the bar-room, which his men had succeeded in breaking into. It was there that he held his conference with Mayor Monroe and the City Council, who promised to do all in their power to restore peace and quiet in the city and prevent a bloody conflict between the troops and the citizens, which seemed almost inevitable.