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Louisiana Anthology

Mrs. Washington.
The Unrivalled Cook-Book and Housekeeper's Guide.

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CONTENTS.


THE UNRIVALLED COOK-BOOK.



HORS D'ŒUVRES

Hors D'œuvres, or zaksnska, or antipasta, as they are variously called in France, Russia, and Italy, are of two kinds, cold and hot, but more often cold. They should be prettily arranged in the small dishes sold for the purpose, and placed on the dinner or luncheon table before the beginning of the meal. Olives, mixed pickles, celery, etc., are all hors d'oeuvres, and require no further attention than to be arranged prettily and symmetrically in their dishes. The hors d'œuvres given below, however, require a certain amount of preparation.

Artichokes.— Choose small, tender artichokes, pull off the leaves, and remove the heart from the bottom of the plant. Throw the hearts into vinegar and water for half an hour or longer, then wipe dry with a clean cloth, arrange in a hors d'eeuvre dish, salt them lightly, pepper them with white pepper, stick little bits of ice among them, and serve.

Roast Almonds (No. 1).— Blanch half a pound of almonds, roll them in fine table salt, and roast them in a pan as you would coffee.

Roast Almonds (No. 2).— Blanch half a pound of almonds as above, immerse in fresh cream for half an hour, then dry, roll in salt, and roast.

Blanched Peanuts.— Blanch, roll in salt, roast as you do almonds.

Radishes.— Wash carefully, and scrape the skin off the long radishes. Half peel the round ones, giving the effect of an opening rosebud. Arrange in a hors d'œuvre dish.

Salted Cucumbers (Cuisiniere Polonaise).— Wash and wipe carefully some medium–sized green cucumbers, then put them to dry for twenty–four hours in a warm, dry place. Have ready a small cask in which white wine has been kept. Warm this cask thoroughly, put in the bottom a layer of the cucumbers, chopped fennel and cherry leaves, with a little bruised coriander–seed. Proceed in this way until the cask is three fourths full. Then pour on salted water which has boiled and cooled, close the cask with the greatest care, and put it in a cool place on two pieces of wood. As the water is absorbed, fill up with cold boiled water. Turn every day, and scrape off the mould if any forms on the exterior. At the close of two or three months the upper cover may be taken off the barrel, and planks and a weight put on the cucumbers to keep them down.

Bologna Sausage.— Cut the Bologna sausage very thin, and arrange in a small dish. Garnish with crimped parsley.

Caviare.— Use none but the finest Russian caviar. Put in a small hors d'oeuvre dish. Garnish with slices of lemon.

Caviare Sandwiches.— Cut some white bread very thin. Spread thickly with caviare. Cut into lozenge – shaped sandwiches. Garnish with crimped parsley, and dish.

Shrimps.— Boil to a bright red, arrange in a small dish, surround with crimped parsley, and serve.

Variegated Sandwiches.— Cut an equal quantity of pumper–nickel bread and fine white bread very thin; spread with butter, then with the roe of salted herring; lay a slice of pumper–nickel on a slice of white bread, press firmly together, trim into lozenge–shaped sandwiches, and serve.

Butter.— The butter for hors d'œuvre should always be formed into tiny pats, or rolled into balls, garnished with crimped parsley, and served with little bits of ice.

Olives.— If the olives should be too salt, soak them in fresh water for half an hour before serving. They should be completely covered with water, or they will thicken.

Anchovies.— Always buy, if possible, the Nice anchovies, they are small, round, and plump. In preparing anchovies for hors d'oeuvre they should be soaked for two hours in cold water. Then divide, skin, and bone them, arrange in a hors d'œuvre dish, which must previously have been well rubbed with garlic; dust with roasted parsley, cover with olive–oil, and serve.

Truffles au Vin. — Cook green truffles whole in a saucepan with some fat meat chopped fine, a bay leaf, parsley, thyme, a little bouillon, and half a bottle of white wine; salt and pepper. Remove your truffles from the sauce, drain well, and serve on a folded napkin.

Broiled Mushrooms.— Choose large, fine ones. Peel and remove the stems; place them bottom upwards on the gridiron; fill them with butter in which you have kneaded chopped parsley; salt and pepper a moment before you serve them.

Boiled Peanuts.— Choose fresh well–filled peanuts. Carefully selecting them, as nearly as possible, the same size. Boil them in salt water, drain and serve. This is generally served before the soup.

Cucumbers.— Grate your cucumbers, season with salt and pepper. Garnish your hors d'œuvre dish with crimped parsley.

Stuffed Olives.— Remove the stems from the olives, and stuff them with anchovies, pounded with enough olive–oil to moisten them thoroughly.

Sardines.— Arrange them carefully in a dish, and garnish with crimped parsley.

Sapsago Sandwiches.— Grate some sapsago cheese; mix it to a paste with fresh butter. Cut your slices of bread very thin, and all the same size and form; butter them, and arrange them tastefully in the hors d'oeuvre dish.

Hazelnut Butter.— Pound some ripe hazelnuts with fresh butter. Mould it into little forms, and serve.

Pickled Oysters.— Drain the oysters. Arrange them in the hors d'œuvre dish, on a bed of crimped parsley.


SOUPS
GENERAL DIRECTIONS.

Chief among soups is beef soup, or beef bouillon. That is, it is the safest foundation for soups and sauces. Gouffé asserts that without beef it is impossible to have what he calls a pot an feu extra. The best soup or stock pot is of copper, or iron, enamelled inside with tin, or, better still, with porcelain. The best parts of beef to buy for the soup pot are the collops, the rump, the brisket, and the shin. The shoulder and heel may also be used, but do not make such strong soup. Beef, for soup, should be extremely fresh, and the same thing is true of all soup meat. (Gouffé.)
     The fire should be clear, even, and steady. It should not be fierce, and you should carefully avoid allowing it to become so, when you replenish it. All soups should be cooked steadily and slowly. Be careful never to cover the pot quite closely. The cover should be raised on one side for about an inch or more.      The meat should be prepared as follows: First, cut the meat from the bones; secondly, bind it with a cord or cut it into strips; thirdly, crack the bones thoroughly with a mallet.
     Put the bones into the pot first, then the meat; then pour on the water, which should be filtered; allow a quart of water to each pound of beef; heat very slowly, and do not add the salt until the meat is pretty well cooked; boil the meat to rags, and be careful to skim the soup from time to time. When vegetables are cooked in the soup, to give it a flavor, they must be carefully removed with a perforated skimmer as soon as they are tender. When the soup is strong enough, which will probably be in six or seven hours' time, remove the meat, strain the soup through a fine strainer, taste, salt again, if necessary, and set it away to cool. Use it the next day, first skimming off the fat. Then heat, strain again, color with caramel, and serve.




To Make Good Stock.— Boil some bones (of beef, mutton, veal, poultry, or game, or all together) for four hours; . then pour off the liquor into the stock–pot, and add to each gallon the meat off a knuckle of veal, a pound of lean beef, a pound of absolutely lean bacon, all sliced fine, with two or three scraped carrots, two onions, two turnips, two heads of celery sliced, and two quarts of water. Stew until the meat is boiled to rags, being careful not to let it burn.

To Clarify Stock.— Put the stock over a good fire, and, when boiling, add the white of one egg to each quart of stock, proceeding as follows: beat the whites of the eggs up well in a little water; then add a little hot stock; beat to a froth, and pour gradually into the pot; then beat the whole hard and long; allow it to boil up once, and immediately remove and strain through a thin flannel cloth.

Asparagus Green Soup.— Three pounds of veal, cut into small pieces; one half pound of salt pork; three bunches of asparagus; one gallon of water.
     Cut the entire stalk of the asparagus into pieces an inch long; and when the meat has boiled one hour, add half of the asparagus to the liquor in the pot; boil half an hour longer and strain, pressing the asparagus pulp very hard to extract the green coloring; add the other half of the asparagus (the heads only, which should be kept in cold water until you are ready for them), and boil twenty minutes more; then serve with small bread dice fried in butter.

Corn Soup.— One large chicken cut into small pieces; twelve ears of green corn, young and tender; one gallon of water; salt to taste.
     Boil the chicken to rags; then cut the corn from the cob, and put into the pot, and stew an hour longer, still gently; remove the chicken, season with salt and pepper; thicken with corn flour, and serve at once.

Purée of Carrots with Cream.— To the liquor in which a knuckle of veal has been boiled add twelve large carrots; boil till the carrots will mash through a sieve; put them through, and then let them boil in the broth until it is quite smooth; add half a pint of cream and a little salt.

White Soup of Jerusalem Artichokes.— The stock of veal, to which add three pounds of boiled artichokes, to be pulped through a sieve; season with salt, a soupçon of cayenne pepper, and before it is poured into the tureen stir in some good, thick cream. It must on no account be allowed to boil after the cream is poured in, but care should be taken that it is not chilled by it.

Almond Soup.— Blanch one and a half pounds of sweet almonds, and one dozen bitter almonds. Throw them in cold water, drain well, and pound them in a mortar, taking care not to let them oil, by adding from time to time a little water; put a quart and a half of water in a saucepan; when it boils put in half the grated rind of a lemon and a few coriander seeds, and let them steep a few minutes; then stir in your pounded almonds; strain through a fine sieve, put in a pinch of salt, and sweeten to taste. Warm this in a bain–marie; sprinkle some fried croutons (they should be a light gold color), with powdered sugar, and, just before serving, throw them in your lait d'amandes.
     This is a Spanish soup de rigueur for Christmas. They add powdered cinnamon.

Barsch de Gallicie, Russian Beet Soup.— The day before making the barsch prepare the beet juice in the following manner: peel and cut in slices three large red beets; put them into an earthen jar, and cover them with tepid water, to which you have added a little vinegar; add also about six ounces of bread crumbs, and two glasses of milk. Cover the jar closely, and keep it in a warm place for twenty–four hours; then strain and filter. The juice will be of a beautiful clear red color.
     To make the barsch: four quarts of sour beet juice prepared as directed above; four pounds of beef haunch; one pig's ear, salted, scalded, and blanched; two elmlots. Take one bunch of celery, chopped fine; one beet, chopped fine; one shalot; some mushrooms; have the shalot, celery, beet, and mushrooms all fried to a light brown in butter.
     Put the beef into an earthen pot, and cover with the four quarts of sour beet juice. Put on the fire and skim carefully all the scum which rises to the top; as soon as it boils set the pot back, where the soup will not boil, but simmer; add the pig's ear, the two whole shalots. and cook slowly until the vegetables are tender; then strain and pour three quarts of the bouillon thus made over the fried vegetables; let it come to a boil, and add four smoked sausages; twenty minutes afterward add several spoonfuls of raw beet juice filtered (this juice should be of the brightest red color); add also the pig's ear, cut into dice, and a piece of the beef cut into dice; cut the sausages into thick slices, and arrange them in the soup tureen; add a pinch of powdered parsley to the soup, pour it into the soup tureen, and serve with little crusts of bread cut into squares, hollowed, and fried in butter; the hollow in the centre of each square should be filled with cooked beef marrow. This is the king of soups.

Bean Soup (dried).— Kidney, mock–turtle, or rice, or field bean. The mock–turtle is best. One gallon of cold water; one quart of beans, soaked over–night in lukewarm water; two pounds of salt pork, cut into small pieces; one teaspoonful of brown sugar; one red–pepper pod.
     Put the water, pork, and beans into the soup pot, and boil three hours, closely covered; then shred into the pot a head of celery, and the red–pepper pod. Simmer now an hour longer, stir in the sugar, strain, and serve with slices of lemon.
     Or, you may substitute equal parts of beef and lean ham for the pork, and at the last moment drop small forcemeat balls and slices of hard–boiled eggs into the soup tureen. This more luxurious treatment, however, only befits the mock–turtle bean.

Poor Marts Bean, or Lentil Soup.— One half pound of brown lentils, or dried beans; one carrot; four cloves; three onions; a small bunch of sweet herbs; one and a half ounces of dripping; pepper and salt to taste.
     Wash the lentils well in several waters; let them then soak in two quarts of water for twenty–four hours. When ready to make the soup, cut up the onion and carrot in thin slices, and fry to a light brown in the dripping. Put them into a pot with what remains of the dripping, and add the lentils and the water in which they were steeped, also the herbs and cloves; boil all for three hours, adding more water to make up the waste from boiling; add pepper and salt to taste; strain through a coarse sieve, and serve in a soup tureen with small dice of fried bread.

Calves' –Head Soup.— Parboil in salt and water half a calf's head, nicely cleaned and prepared; cut it in little dice and set it apart. Put some butter in a saucepan, stir in enough browned flour to make a roux; add an onion stuck with cloves, a bay leaf, thyme, parsley, sweet–basil, and sweet–marjoram, some stalks of celery; one pound of lean ham; one and a half pounds of lean beef; a pinch of cayenne pepper; add enough bouillon to make your soup rich and thick; let it cook two hours; strain it through a colander; return it to the saucepan; add your calf's head cut in dice; some yolks of hardboiled eggs cut in quarters; and, just before serving, add a glass of good Madeira and a dessertspoonful of lemon juice.

Cherry Soup.— Take some ripe cherries and stem them, crush them in a mortar, cracking the kernels, and pour them in a porcelain–lined saucepan, with as much wine and water as you have cherries; add some grated lemon rind; let it boil till the fruit is cooked to a pulp; strain it through a hair sieve; sweeten to taste; add some cinnamon; warm it, and serve it poured over fried croutons of bread.

Beer Soup.— Scorch half a pound of bread crumbs in some fresh butter; add a quart of strong beer, as much red wine, the rind of a lemon, cinnamon, cloves, and sugar; let it boil up once, and pour your soup over croutons of fried bread in your tureen.

Bouillon, Cold (for summer).— Make a strong beef bouillon according to the receipt given for clear soup à la Virginie; when sufficiently strong (and for this purpose it should be very strong), skim, strain, salt, and set it away to cool. When quite cold, strain again, and when perfectly clear, heat again, and add enough caramel coloring to give it the right color; then remove from the fire, strain, and set away to cool; serve ice cold, with Piedmontese (Italian) bread, browned.

Bouillon Blanc (White Soup).— Put into the soup pot two knuckles of veal, several veal bones, and a chicken; pour over them four quarts of water, and salt slightly;" when the soup comes to a boil skim carefully, and draw to the side of the stove where it will simmer but not boil; keep the pot three fourths covered; –let it cook very slowly, arranging the position of the pot so that, if possible, it will only boil on one side; half an hour later add a large carrot, a small piece of white turnip, a piece of celery, two shallots, and a tiny bunch of parsley; cook slowly until all the meat has fallen from the bones, and is completely boiled to rags; then strain the bouillon, first through a fine sieve, and then through a cloth, and set it away to cool. This stock may be used for all white soups.

Bouillon Succulent.— Put into the soup pot four and a half pounds of lean beef cut into small squares; pour over eight quarts of cold water; put the pot on the fire, and cook slowly as above directed; two hours afterwards add the bone of a piece of roast beef, or of roast leg of mutton; continue to cook slowly until the meat is boiled absolutely to rags, or, better still, to shreds; then add a teaspoonful of burned sugar, and salt to taste; strain and skim. This receipt makes a very good, clear bouillon.

Julienne Soup.— Clean and peel two large carrots and a turnip; add a head of celery, two new onions, a shallot, half a Savoy cabbage, a fine head of lettuce, a handful of sorrel, and some tender green pease; cut the vegetables into fine shreds about two inches long.
     Put the onions and shallot into a casserole with some butter; cook for a few minutes over a moderate fire; then add the carrots, turnip, and celery; cook for a few moments; add a little salt and a pinch of sugar, and pour over them the third of a quart of strained and clear bouillon; cook the vegetables in this until the bouillon begins to jelly; then add two quarts of strong, fresh bouillon, boiling hot; draw the soup pot to the side of the fire, and twenty–five minutes later add the lettuce, the blanched cabbage, and last of all the raw green pease; cook the vegetables for three quarters of an hour; then skim the soup; add the chopped sorrel (well blanched) and a glass of purée of fresh green pease; mix all well together, and pour into the soup tureen.

Julienne à la Musse.— Cut into fine shreds a carrot, a small turnip, a piece of celery, a large radish, two onions, and a shallot; shred also some mushrooms (as many as the other vegetables).
     Fry the onions, shallot, and other vegetables very lightly in butter; lay them on paper until the grease is absorbed, and then put them in a casserole; pour over them the third of a quart of good bouillon, and boil until the bouillon jellies; then pour on three quarts of fresh bouillon, boiling hot; draw the casserole to the side of the fire, and allow it to simmer for an hour and a half; then strain and skim the soup; add a pinch of chopped fennel, and a few spoonfuls of sour cream (strained); pour into the soup tureen, and serve. In Russia a pâtés of tiny plates, croquettes, or rissoles, are handed with this soup.

Julienne à la Polonaise.— Put into a pot four handfuls of dried pease; two handfuls of dried mushrooms; a carrot; part of a head of celery; pour over these vegetables four quarts of water (cold); when the water really boils, draw the casserole to one side of the fire, and cook the vegetables slowly.
     Cut into shreds a shallot, an onion, a head of celery, a bunch of parsley, and a piece of raw beet; fry all lightly in butter, and ten minutes after pour over them two quarts of the vegetable bouillon, which should previously have been carefully strained; when this begins to boil, set it where it will only simmer, and three quarters of an hour afterwards add half a winter cabbage shredded and blanched and a few of the cooked mushrooms; in half an hour add some strained sour cream, and a pinch of powdered fennel, as for Russian julienne; pour into the soup tureen, and serve with rissoles, croquettes, or pâtés.

Bouillon Mulâtre.— Take the remains of a roast turkey, removing the stuffing; put it in a saucepan with a little butter, sliced onion, parsley, a slice of lean ham, and pepper; let it cook, and add sufficient water for the soup; simmer two hours, and strain; mash to a smooth paste the yolks of six hard–boiled eggs; stir this in the bouillon; chop up the whites in little dice, add, and serve.

Corn and Tomato Soup.— Boil three pounds of beef in four quarts of water, and add a dozen fine large tomatoes; an hour before serving, strain, and pass the tomatoes through a colander; return soup to the fire; boil half a dozen ears of corn in a little salt and water; when done cut the corn from the cob; pour your corn in the soup; add a teaspoonful of butter and salt and pepper; let it boil up, and serve.

Casa linga.— Make a good rich broth. Chop cabbage, carrots, onions, turnips, in fact any vegetables you have; mince a clove of garlic with a pinch of lavender, and mash some Irish potatoes; put all this in your soup; let it cook slowly; add macaroni, pastini, or vermicelli; stir in a lump of butter; season highly with black and red pepper; salt to taste, and serve. This soup should be cooked five or six hours.

Green–Pea Soup.— Make a rich broth, to which you add a slice of lean ham; boil the green pease in salt and water; pass through a colander; add a spoonful of butter; season to taste with salt and pepper, and pour over fried croutons of bread in the soup tureen.

Onion Soup à la Créole.— Slice several large onions, fry them in a saucepan with butter; sprinkle with a little flour, and season with salt and pepper; let the onions color a little, then stir in a quart of rich sweet milk, and let it boil up two or three times; strain through a colander, and pour over fried croutons in a soup tureen .
     This soup is admirable when one is fatigued.

Cheese Soup.— Make a good bouillon of onion or cabbage soup; grate some cheese in the bottom of your soup tureen; put in a layer of thin slices of bread, then a layer of cheese, then a layer of cabbage, and again some cheese; before pouring the bouillon in the tureen, pour in two glasses of cream; do not salt the bouillon on account of the cheese. Parmesan is the best cheese; you can keep it a long time in salt, or wrapped in a greased cloth.

Cherry Soup (German receipt).— Stone and stem three fourths of a quart of cherries (sour), and put two thirds of the quantity in an earthen pot, with a quart of warm water, and a little zest of lemon, also a stick of cinnamon; cook over a quick fire for ten minutes; then add two teaspoonfuls of corn flour (of the best quality) mixed with cold water; ten minutes after put the cherries and liquid into a larger casserole; add two or three quarts of good broth, the rest of the cherries, and a little sugar; when the soup boils, set the pot where it will simmer. Meanwhile pound two handfuls of cherry kernels to a fine powder, and put into a casserole with two or three glasses of Bordeaux; add some bouillon; stir steadily, and when quite hot remove from the fire, strain, and add to the soup; serve with the soup a plate of browned biscuits cut into dice.

Purée of Chicken. — Take a large boiled chicken, remove all bones, skin, and fat, and put the chicken into a mortar together with the yolks of four hard–boiled eggs; chop and pound until the chicken has been reduced to the consistency of paste; then add some bread crumbs soaked in cream, and twelve blanched sweet almonds; again chop and pound until the whole has been reduced to the consistency of a smooth, thick paste; place this paste in an earthen bowl, which should previously have been well rubbed with garlic, and add little by little, stirring all the time, some good chicken broth; take care to have the purée neither too thin nor too thick; it should be as thick as custard; when it is of the proper consistency strain it through a tin strainer; pour it into an earthen stewpan; salt to taste, and cook à bain–marie.

Cucumber Soup, Cold.— Put into a stewpan three pounds of fish, half a pound of absolutely lean ham, two large cucumbers peeled and sliced, a small bag of celery seed, a minced shallot, and two quarts of water.
     The fish, of course, should be skinned and cleaned, and pulled to pieces (with silver or wooden forks), the ham chopped fine; boil until the fish and ham are in rags, then strain and set aside to cool; when quite cold skim and strain again, and, if the soup is entirely clear and freed from fat, pour into the soup tureen, which should previously have been well rubbed with garlic; have ready some sliced cucumber prepared as for the garspacho; i. e., peeled, sliced very thinly, soaked in ice–water for two hours, and dressed with vinegar, pepper, and salt; add these to the soup, and also some dice of dried bread dipped in lemon juice. If properly made, this is a delicious soup. It is to be eaten frost cold.

Chicken Soup, Cold.— Two young fowls; one head of celery; half a cup of rice; one gallon of water; quarter pound of cooked ham.
     Cut the fowls to pieces; chop the celery fine, and put it with the fowls into the pot with enough water to cover them; stew for an hour, and then add the remainder of the water, boiling hot; when the soup has boiled in all for two hours and a half strain it, and set it aside to cool; when quite cold and clear add some roasted parsley powdered fine, and the ham, which should previously have been dried in the oven and grated fine; salt and pepper to taste, and stir in last of all a pint of rich fresh cream, and some bread dice dipped in lemon juice; eat cold.

Clear Soup à la Virginie.— One knuckle of veal; one chicken, stripped of skin and fat; one head of celery; half an onion; three peppercorns, and two cloves; one sprig of parsley; one saltspoonful of salt; cover with three quarts of clear cold water.
     Put all the ingredients into your soup pot, which must be placed on the back of the stove; let it cook slowly and steadily for six hours, and skim often; it must never be allowed to boil; when the meat is white, and fallen to rags, take it out; strain the soup, and clarify if necessary; serve entirely clear, or with shreds of boiled carrot.

Consommé.— Put a chicken and a knuckle of veal in a soup pot; cover with cold bouillon; put it over a slow fire; let the bouillon heat slowly, and you obtain a clear, substantial consommé; skim and add vegetables, as for a pot aufeu.

Tomato Soup. — Peel your tomatoes; boil them in a saucepan with an onion, a soup–bunch, celery, salt and pepper; strain them; add a little pinch of flour, and a lump of butter, and serve poured over fried croutons in your soup tureen.

Irish Potato Soup.— Peel and boil your potatoes with an onion, a soup–bunch, salt and pepper; press your potatoes through a colander; thin your purée with rich milk, and add a lump of butter; let it heat well, and

Consommé à la Régale.— Prepare a strong, clear consommé after the receipt for bouillon succulent; prepare also a hard custard, omitting the sugar, and adding a soupçon of gelatine to make it quite firm; when this is cold and firm, cut it into squares about half an inch thick and large; when the soup is in the soup tureen drop in the squares.

Consommé with Poached Eggs.— Prepare a consommé as above, and, when ready to serve, drop in some wellpoached eggs.

Consommé aux Jacobins.— Put into the soup pot a variety of minced vegetables; add some pieces of raw veal, poultry, or game (the greater the variety the better the soup), also two or three roast pheasants; pour over them a quart of bouillon, and boil down over a clear fire; when the bouillon has boiled away add five quarts of bouillon, and a glass of wine; skim carefully, and add half a head of celery and some sweet herbs; cook slowly on the back of the stove for an hour; then let it cool, and when almost tepid strain, and clarify it carefully with some raw hare, a little lean raw veal, two whole eggs, and a little Madeira. Meanwhile have ready some forcemeat balls made in the following manner: chop fine about six ounces of lean ham (cooked), and mix with it two spoonfuls of béchamel; two of tomato sauce, and a pinch of cayenne; pass all through a sieve, and then add two teaspoonfuls of Madeira; six ditto of good consommé; the yolks of six eggs, and two whole eggs; fill with this some small, round, buttered moulds, and cook them à bainmarie; when cooked divide each ball neatly into four quarters; fill the soup tureen with the consommé and drop in the Jacobins; add, also, a cupful of freshly cooked green pease.

Plain Consommé.— Proceed as for good stock, substituting for the ham a good–sized chicken, and omitting the onions; skim, strain, and color with caramel coloring.


MEAT SOUPS.

Consommé à l'Imperatrice.— Two quarts of water; three pounds of lean beef; half a pound of roasted chicken; two carrots; two leeks; two onions; two cloves; soupbunch; salt to taste; cook eight hours, skim, and serve.
     Carème recommends always that a chicken should be roasted till half done on the spit, before boiling for soup. It gives a better taste and color.

Soup Made in an Hour.— Cut one and a half pounds of beef in small pieces; put it in a saucepan with carrots, sliced onions, a little lard, and half a glass of water; let it simmer and steam fifteen minutes, until it begins to stick to the bottom of the saucepan; then pour in a pint of boiling water; sprinkle a little salt; let it boil three quarters of an hour; strain through a colander, and serve.

Corn Soup. — One can of corn; half a quart of rich milk; half a quart of water; three eggs, well beaten; a little rolled cracker; butter, pepper, and salt to taste. – Put the milk and water into a porcelain–lined stewpan; when warm add the corn; boil ten minutes; then stir in the beaten eggs; add butter, pepper, and salt to taste, and thicken with a little rolled cracker.

Dried–Pea Soup.— One gallon of water; one quart of split pease, soaked over–night; one pound of salt pork, cut into dice; half a pound of lean beef; one head of celery.
     Boil all together slowly until the liquid does not exceed two quarts; pour into a colander, and press through it with a silver spoon; return to the pot, and add a tablespoonful of sugar; salt and pepper to taste; add a little powdered parsley; serve with dice of fried bread.

Parsley Cream Soup, Cold.— Take a quart of the very best fresh milk, and put it on the fire to warm, not boil, with a slice of onion, a small bit of cayenne pod, a bunch of parsley, a piece of lemon peel, and salt to taste; when scalding hot, add a heaping tablespoonful of rice flour wet with cold milk; stir until smoothly dissolved; then allow it to boil up once; take it from the fire, and strain into the soup tureen, and set it aside to cool; when perfectly cold add a large handful of roast parsley, crumbled fine; sift it into the soup, a little at a time, stirring steadily one way until the soup is delicately colored; serve frost cold.

Celery Cream Soup, Cold.— Take a quart of the best fresh milk, and put it on a fire to boil, with a head of good celery chopped fine, two or three peppercorns, and salt to taste; when heated almost to boiling, add the beaten yolks of five eggs, and a tablespoonful of rice flour wet with cold water; stir carefully, and, as soon as the soup has assumed the consistency of cream, take it from the fire; strain it into the soup tureen, and set it away to cool; eat frost cold. Both the above soups should be cooked à bain–marie.

Sorrel Soup, Cold.—Take a quantity of fresh sorrel, some chervil, beet tops, and several heads of crisp lettuce, some button onions chopped fine, and a bunch of parsley; put all into a stewpan with enough water to keep them from burning, and, when nearly cooked, add some good bouillon, which has been skimmed and strained until it is thoroughly freed from fat; stir this well into the vegetable soup; then remove the stewpan from the fire, and strain the soup into a bowl; when quite cold it should again be strained, salted and peppered to taste; some very thin slices of lemon should be put into the tureen to be served with the soup.

Cordiale alla Fiarentina, Cold. — Prepare a bouillon exactly as for a hot "Cordiale," and when it is cold, strained, and perfectly clear, add (in the proportion of an egg for each guest) some eggs well beaten, and, lastly, some lemon juice, and salt to taste; serve at once.

Cockie–leekie Soup.— Put into an earthen pot a knuckle of veal, the same of ham, and 'a large chicken cut up with its liver and lights; add five quarts of water, and the moment the soup begins to boil set it where it can only simmer; add an onion, a head of celery, a carrot, a turnip, and two cloves; when the meat is cooked pour the bouillon into another casserole, skim, and strain it, and add eight small shallots peeled and cut in half; cook slowly. Meanwhile chop into dice the chicken and ham; keep hot in a little bouillon, and when the soup is ready to serve, put the meat into the soup tureen ; pour over it the bouillon and shallots, and serve hot.

Scotch Broth. — Cut a shoulder of mutton into two parts, wash carefully in tepid water, and put into an earthen pot with a pinch of salt, and five quarts of water; when it boils, skim, and set on the stove where it can only simmer; add five large carrots, a turnip, a head of celery, and a bunch of parsley and thyme, two cloves, and a handful of pearl barley; cook slowly for two hours and a half; then take out the meat, bone it, and cut it into dice; add to the bouillon two small shallots, chopped fine, and fried lightly in butter; take out the other vegetables, chop fine and return to the soup, together with the meat; serve all together in the soup tureen.

Hodge Podge.— Put into an earthen pot two and a quarter pounds of beef, half a shoulder of mutton, and a pinch of coarse salt; when it begins to boil, skim, and set on the back of the stove where it can only simmer; an hour and a half later add all the young vegetables which are in season, cabbages, lettuce, celery, onions, carrots, beets, tomatoes, turnips, pease, and asparagus; cut all into dice, and of the asparagus use only the points. These vegetables, of course, must be added in order, those which take longest to cook being the first put in; at the last moment take out the meat, thicken the bouillon with a tablespoonf ul of arrowroot, and serve with the vegetables.

Deer's–Head Soup à la Malmesbury.— Take a young deer's head, skin it, bone it, and put it into a pot with enough cold water to cover it, and cook for a quarter of an hour; then take it out, dry and scrape the meat, and cut into four parts; place these in a casserole, add a ham bone (raw), some raw veal, some vegetables, a bunch of sweet herbs, and four quarts of good bouillon, and a bottle of white wine; skim carefully until the soup boils, then set it on one side of the stove where it will cook very slowly; when the meat is quite tender take it out, cut it into square dice, and keep it hot, with a little Madeira wine; strain the broth. Meanwhile, while the soup is cooking, cook also in butter a chopped onion, a chopped carrot, a piece.of celery, and a little ham chopped fine; dust all with three teaspoonfuls of arrow–root, and add, little by little, two quarts of the soup; the moment it comes to the boil set it on one side of the stove, and add a bunch of marigold, thyme, and laurel; twenty–five minutes afterwards skim and strain the soup, add the meat and Madeira wine and six button mushrooms chopped fine; boil again for twelve minutes, skimming carefully, and at the last minute add cayenne pepper and salt to taste.

Soupe à la Dolgorouki.— Prepare two or three quarts of strong chicken broth, strain, and keep it where it will not boil; chop fine one pound of boiled ham, and mix with some onions boiled and chopped fine, and bind all with bechamel sauce; some minutes afterwards add the yolks of four or five eggs, and put all into a casserole; when ready to serve strain the broth, and mix in the chickening, add cayenne pepper and salt to taste, and the breasts of four boiled chickens chopped fine.

Consommé, aux Ravioles de Gibier.— Prepare two or three quarts of consommé of game; skin and bone a raw partridge; chop it fine and work to a smooth paste with half the quantity of calves' brains, cooked, and an equal quantity of beef marrow and parmesan; when smoothly mixed bind with the yolks of two eggs, and prepare; with this paste make five or six dozen tiny ravioles ; five minutes before serving drop the ravioles into boiling water (salted), to which you have added two or three spoonfuls of bouillon; cook three minutes, drain the ravioles, range them in the soup tureen, pour over the consommé of game, and serve.

Fish Soup.— Choose a large, fine fish, and when thoroughly cleaned put it on the fire with a sufficient quantity of water, measuring the water as follows: for each pound of fish one quart of water; let it boil slowly until the fish is boiled to rags and is tasteless; then take out fish and bones and throw into the broth some butter in which onions and sweet herbs have previously been cooked; add a teaspoonful of Worcestershire sauce, salt and pepper to taste, and serve with small squares of fried bread and thin slices of lemon.

Fish Stock.— Put into a saucepan some good butter, sliced onions, a little dried okra, and some sliced tomatoes; add as many different kinds of small fish as you can get — oysters, clams, smelts, prawns, crabs, shrimps, and all kinds of pan fish; cook all together, until the onions are well browned, then add a bunch of sweet herbs, seasoning to taste, and some fish bouillon (as above); after this has cooked for another half hour, pound with a wooden pestle, strain, and cook again until it jellies.

Lobster Soup, Bisque.— Pick out all the meat from a boiled lobster, pound it in a mortar with an equal quantity of butter till a fine orange–colored pulp is obtained; to this add pepper, salt, and a soupçon of grated nutmeg; take as much rolled bread crumb as there is lobster pulp, soak them in stock, melt a piece of butter in a saucepan, amalgamate with it a heaped tablespoonful of sifted flour, mix the lobster pulp with the bread crumbs, and put both in the saucepan on the fire, stirring the contents until they thicken and boil; draw it then on one side, and carefully skim off superfluous fat; then strain the soup through a hair sieve, make it boiling hot, and serve with small dice of bread fried in butter.

Bisque of Shrimps, Prawns, or Crabs, is made in precisely the same way, but is improved by the addition of a liqueur–glass of sherry or Moiss àlka just before serving.

Bisque à la Créole (Madame Eugène).— Take a peck of fat crawfish, wash them through several waters to clean them, and boil them in salt and water which you use later for your bouillon; take off the heads; peel your crawfish; reserve twenty–four heads to stuff for your bisque; take all the rest of the heads and all the peeling, carefully removing the sand–bug, and pound them in a mortar; pour them in the bouillon, in which they were boiled, with a soup–bunch, a head of celery, salt, and pepper; let it simmer slowly two hours; in the meantime pound the tails of the crawfish you have peeled in a mortar, mix them with butter, chopped onions, chopped ham, salt, and pepper; bind it with the beaten yolk of an egg and fry it; stuff the heads with this; strain the bouillon, make a soup, in which you fry a chopped onion, till it colors; strain this in your bouillon, and pour it boiling hot into your tureen over the stuffed heads and fried croutons of bread; a moment before serving stir in a tablespoonful of sweet red–pepper powder that is used for coloring.

Bouillabaisse, New Orleans.— Take several kinds of fish; skin, bone, and cut in pieces the size of an egg; mince an onion, a tiny piece of garlic, one large tomato, a few sprigs of parsley; put the whole in a saucepan with half a tumbler of the finest olive–oil, a pinch of pepper, and one of mixed spice; when the onions are slightly colored, add the fish, salt to taste, and add an intinitesimally small piece of powdered saffron, a glass of white wine, and sufficient boilt ing water to come up to, but not cover the fish; or, add water in which claims have previously been boiled; this gives the bouillabaisse an exquisite flavor; let the bouillabaisse now boil fast for twenty minutes, or until the liquor is reduced by one fourth; then serve the fish in a very hot dish, and the liquor in another, over small thick squares of light white bread toasted on both sides.

Bouillabaisse à la Marseillais.— Take six pounds of different kinds of fish; clean, remove the skin and bones, and cut the fish in slices, two inches long; put four ounces of olive–oil in a saucepan, with two sliced onions, four tomatoes, a slice of lean ham chopped up; fry them, and add two glasses of bouillon, and season with salt and pepper; let it cook an hour, and strain through a colander; put this sauce in another saucepan, and lay in it your slices of fish nicely prepared; let it cook gently, and add a glass of good white wine; dress your fish on a dish and pour this sauce, in which it has cooked, over it; in another saucepan you must put the heads, the bones, and the skins of the fish, a slice of ham, two sliced onions, tomatoes, four cloves, two bay leaves, a bunch of parsley, salt and pepper, and two quarts of water; boil this an hour and a half, skim, and, just before straining, put in a pinch of saffron; strain and add half a bottle of the best white wine; have slices of bread nicely toasted, and serve with each spoonful of soup a slice of fish and a slice of toasted bread. The fish, on a separate dish, should be served at the same time with the soup.

Couribouillon à la Creole.— Slice and fry some onions in a saucepan, with sliced tomatoes, salt, and pepper; clean and scale your fish; cut it in slices; put it in the saucepan with the onions and tomatoes and some water, add a little chopped parsley; cook till the fish is done; then add a glass of claret, or white wine; let it boil up; remove the fish, which you dress in a dish, on slices of toasted bread; strain the sauce, and serve poured over the fish.

Couribouillon for Sea Fish.— Boil in equal parts of milk and water; season well with salt and pepper; the fish becomes white and firm. Serve with Harvey or Worcestershire sauce.

Clam Soup.— Fifty clams; one quart of milk; one pint of water; two tablespoonfuls of butter. Put the clams into a large pan or tray, and pour cold water over them; as fast as they unclose, take them out, saving all the liquor; put all the liquor of the fifty clams on the fire with a dozen whole peppers, a few bits of cayenne pods, half a dozen blades of mace, and salt to taste; let it boil for ten minutes, keeping it closely covered; then put in the clams, and let it boil for another half–hour, still covered; at this point add the milk, which should previously have been heated to scalding in another vessel; boil up again, taking care that the soup does not burn, and put in the butter; then serve without delay. If you desire a thicker soup, stir into the quart of hot milk a heaping teaspoonful of rice flour, wet up with cold milk.

Catfish Soup.— Six catfish, each weighing one half pound; half pound of salt pork, one pint of milk; two eggs; one head of celery; one onion. Skin and clean the catfish and cut off the heads; then bone and cut up the fish, and chop the pork into small pieces; put into the pot with two quarts of water, chopped sweet herbs, the onion, and the celery; boil to rags, then strain, and return to the saucepan; add the milk, then the eggs, beaten to a froth, and a lump of butter the size of a walnut; boil up once, and serve with dice of toasted bread on top.

Eel Soup is made as above, but must cook longer.

Green Turtle Soup.— Turtle; a glass of good Madeira; two onions; a bunch of sweet herbs; juice of one lemon; five quarts of water. Chop up all the turtle meat with the entrails and bones; the fat must be set aside; put the meat, entrails, bones, etc., into a pot; add the herbs, onions, pepper, and salt, and four quarts of water; stew steadily for five hours, never ceasing the boiling during all the time; then strain, thicken with browned flour, and put in the green fat, cut in pieces an inch long. The green fat should previously have been simmered for one hour in two quarts of water. Thicken with browned flour, return to the soup pot, and simmer gently an hour longer. If there are eggs in the turtle, boil them in a separate vessel for four hours, and throw into the soup before taking it up; if not, put in the forcemeat balls, then the juice of the lemon, and the wine; beat up once, and pour out. Some cooks add the forcemeat before straining, boiling all together five hours; then strain, thicken, and put in the green fat, cut into strips an inch long. This is the custom followed at the lord–mayor's dinner in London.
     For the mock eggs, take the yolks of three hard–boiled eggs, and one raw egg well beaten; rub the boiled eggs into a paste with a teaspoonful of butter, bind with a raw egg, roll into pellets shaped like turtles' eggs, and poach in beef broth (boiling) for two minutes before dropping into the soup.

Forcemeat Balls for the above.— Six tablespoonfuls of turtle meat, chopped very fine; two hard–boiled eggs, yolks only; one tablespoonful of butter; a little oyster liquor; season with cayenne, mace, and half a teaspoonful of white sugar; a pinch of salt. Rub the meat and hard–boiled egg to a smooth paste with the butter and oyster liquor; season, bind with beaten egg, form into balls, roll in beaten egg, then in powdered cracker, fry in butter, and throw into the soup at the last moment.

Turtle Soup from Dried Turtle.— Soak in cold water for twenty–four hours, then place in a stewpan and cover with fresh water; boil quietly for eight hours, then cut into pieces an inch square, and add this turtle meat and liquid to a strong consommé, of clear stock, made thus: For one pound of dried turtle: five pounds of gravy beef, two pounds of leg veal, one calf's foot, and a half pound of lean ham. Cover with water and bring to a boil, removing the scum; add three carrots, two onions, one head of celery, and a packet of turtle herbs and spices; let all simmer gently for eight hours; strain through a fine cloth into–a saucepan, and add the turtle meat and liquor; let all boil together until the turtle meat is quite tender; add a half–pint of good sherry, and the soup is ready for use. This will make four quarts of good soup.

Terrapin Soup.— Clean and cut up a large terrapin with the entrails and bones; remove the gall carefully; put your terrapin in a soup pot with four quarts of water, a soup bunch, a head of celery, onions, thyme, parsley, salt, and pepper; let it simmer four hours; do not let it cease one moment to cook; strain your soup, thicken it with browned flour, return it to the soup pot; tie up in a muslin bag half a tablespoonful of cloves, allspice, and a cracked nutmeg; let it simmer an hour in the soup, then remove. If the turtle has eggs, boil them and throw in the yolks; if there are no eggs, use forcemeat balls; add a glass of Madeira and thin slices of lemon before serving. The forcemeat balls are made by rubbing two hard–boiled yolks to a paste, with butter, and half a dozen spoonfuls of the turtle meat, chopped very fine, and seasoned with salt and pepper; bind with beaten eggs; make into balls; dip, first, into beaten egg, then into powdered cracker, and fry in butter.

Oyster Soup.— Two quarts of oysters with their liquor; one quart of milk; two tablespoonfuls of butter; one teaspoonful of water.
     Put the strained oyster liquor and the water into a saucepan, which is set in a larger one nearly full of boiling water; heat slowly, and, when the liquor begins to boil, season with pepper and salt, and stir in the milk; then stir constantly until the soup nears the boiling–point again; then throw in the oysters, and let them stew until they plump and ruffle at the edge; then put in the butter and stir well until it is melted; serve immediately.

Ouka (Russian national soup).— Of all the admirable soups prepared in Russia, the ouka is the best. It is prepared with small sterlets, cooked the instant they are killed. As the sterlet, however, exists only in Russia, it is only possible to reproduce an imitation of the ouka in other countries. The best imitation is that made with fresh brook trout; but they must be brought into the kitchen alive, and cooked the moment they are killed. Prepare first two full quarts of fish stock (using for the ouka freshwater fish. Meanwhile, cut into fine shreds, as for Julienne, some celery and parsley; blanch, drain, and fry lightly in butter; then cook them in a little bouillon. Prepare, also, two dozen tiny forcemeat balls of whitings and lobster–butter mixed; clarify the bouillon, add a glass of good white wine, and two teaspoonf uls of Madeira. When the work of preparation has advanced to this point, kill three fat, lively, middling–sized brook trout. They must be of a good red color. Bone, remove the heads and tails, cut into small pieces, clean, skin, and sponge them. When the fish consommé is clarified and strained, put a small portion of it into a casserole, add two glasses of sweet champagne; when it comes to a boil drop in the pieces of trout; when they begin to boil take the casserole from the fire and cover it; then strain and skim the liquor in which they have been cooked, trim the pieces of trout neatly, and arrange them in a very hot dish, pouring over them the sauce in which they were cooked; drop into the boiling bouillon the vegetables, add the little forcemeat balls (which should previously have been cooked à bain–marie), and pour at once into the soup tureen; send the tront separately. It should be put into the soup by the guests themselves. In Russia the servant who hands the soup is followed instantly by another handing the trout. Soup so made and served is ouka, and is surpassed by no other soup man has invented.

Garspacho (Spanish Soup Salad).— Two and a half quarts fresh tomatoes peeled and sliced thinly; one large cucumber peeled and sliced thinly; a half clove of garlic; one gallon of water.
     Stew slowly for an hour; then add salt and pepper, and a teaspoonful of white sugar; stir until the sugar is thoroughly dissolved; then take the stewpan from the fire, strain the soup into a tureen, and set it aside to cool. Meanwhile, have ready some fresh cucumbers, peel, and slice them as thinly as possible, and lay them in icewater for an hour and a half. When the soup is quite cold–frost cold–dress the cucumbers with pepper, salt, and vinegar, and add them to the soup, stirring carefully with a wooden spoon. Lastly, have ready some very light white bread, cut into dice and dried (not toasted) in the oven. When the garspacho is ready to be served, pour a very little tarragon vinegar over the bread, and toss the bread quickly into the garspacho. (Excellent.)

German Flour Soup.— Brown some flour; thin it while warm with sufficient milk for your soup; add powdered cinnamon and powdered sugar; cook it and always keep stirring; at the moment of serving thicken it with some beaten yolks of eggs, and pour it in your tureen over slices of toasted bread, fried croutons, or sailors' biscuits broken up.

Sago Soup with Wine.— Wash your sago well; cook it an hour in water, with the rind of a lemon and some cinnamon. When the water is reduced to half its quantity, pour in as much red wine; put in some slices of lemon and sugar; let it boil. Before serving, sprinkle your soup with sugar and cinnamon powdered.

Gumbo Filé with Chicken.—Cut up and fry a large fine chicken in a saucepan with a slice of lean ham, two sliced onions, two sliced tomatoes, a little parsley, and some celery, salt, and pepper; fry all well together, and add two quarts and a half of water; simmer two hours and strain; put your chicken back in the soup, and just as you remove it from the fire, stir "in a coffeespoonful of filé powder; serve with boiled rice and little green bird's–eye peppers.

Shrimp Ochra Gumbo.— Slice your ochra and fry it in butter or lard, with onions, salt, and pepper; boil your shrimps, remove the heads, and peel the tails, and fry them in a saucepan with chopped ham, onions, and cayenne pepper; pour your fried ochra and shrimps into a soup pot; slice in a quart of fine ripe tomatoes (or in winter take a can of tomatoes); cook slowly two hours, and serve with boiled rice. Always serve fresh green peppers with gumbo.

Crab Ochra Gumbo is made in the same manner, substituting crabs for shrimps.

Gumbo Filé with Oysters.— Boil a large, fine, fat chicken in two quarts of water, add a slice of ham, and season to taste. Take the liquor of fifty oysters and pour it in the bouillon. When the chicken is cooked, take it out of the soup; strain your soup through a colander, and just before serving throw in the oysters, and let them cook five minutes, till they are plump; remove your soup pot from the fire, and stir in an after–dinner–coffeespoonful of the filé powder and serve immediately; serve with boiled rice. This is the Southern Soup de Rigueur for suppers.

Giblet Soup.— Feet, neck, pinions, and giblets of three chickens, or of two ducks and two geese; one and a half pounds of veal; half a pound of ham; three quarts of water.
     Crack the bones into small pieces, chop the giblets, and cut the meat into strips; put all together over the fire, with a bunch of sweet herbs and a pinch of allspice; stew slowly for two hours; pick out the giblets with a skimmer and set them aside, where they will keep warm; take up a cupful of the hot soup and stir into it a large tablespoonful of browned flour which has been rubbed to a paste in cold water, then two tablespoonfuls of butter; return to the pot and boil fifteen minutes; season at the last with a teaspoonf ul of burned sugar, a glass of brown sherry, and a tablespoonf ul of tomato catsup; finally, add the giblets and serve.

Good Housekeepers' Soup.— Take the bones and scraps of any cold meat, game, or poultry; put them in a soup pot with vegetables, salt, pepper, and bouillon; three hours before serving (take out half the bouillon, which you set up for the next day) add a cabbage, which makes a cabbage soup. The next day cut up, as for a Julienne, two heads of celery, an onion, two leaves of cabbage, two or three leeks (this is enough for six persons); fry with either butter or lard in a saucepan. When the vegetables are half cooked, pour in the bouillon set aside the preceding day; add two or three fresh potatoes, peeled and quartered; serve hot. This simple and good soup is preferable, sometimes, to Julienne for those who do not like earrots.

Hare, Rabbit, or Gray–Squirrel Soup.— Three pounds of hare, rabbit, or squirrel; one pound of lean ham; two onions, chopped fine; one head of celery, chopped fine; one small bunch of thyme; one small bunch of parsley; ten peppercorns; two blades of mace; one small red–pepper pod; one teaspoonf ul of burned sugar; one claret–glass of red wine.
     Cut up the meat and put it with the chopped vegetables into the pot, with just enough water to cover them; cover closely and stew for an hour; then add two quarts of boiling water, the herbs, pepper pod, and peppercorns; boil two hours longer, salt, stir in a tablespoonful of butter, and thicken with a tablespoonful of browned flour, made into a smooth paste with cold water; add, also, the burned sugar and wine, stir carefully; take out the herbs and vegetables with a perforated strainer; allow the soup to boil up once, and serve with the meat in. (Very good.)

Mulligatawny Soup, No. 1.— One knuckle of veal, weighing five pounds, put on with enough water to cover it. When it is about half done take it off, cut the meat in slices, put it in a cool place until next day; then cut the fat off and fry it in a little butter, and put it in the soup with four dessertspoonfuls of curry–powder, a little salt, and four onions sliced and fried in butter; let all simmer together for two hours; if too thin, thicken with browned flour and butter; serve with rice in another dish.

Mulligatawny Soup, No. 2.— Four pounds of lean beef; one and a half pounds of scrag of mutton; two pounds of lean ham: one knuckle of veal; one gallon of water.
     Boil all together slowly until the water is reduced to two quarts; add two onions, four turnips, and plenty of carrots; strain it off, let it cool, take off the fat, and warm it up with two or three sticks of celery, and rub it through a sieve; put it back in the saucepan with walnut or mushroom catsup, one tablespoonful of curry–powder, a little cayenne pepper, and the juice of a lemon; serve with rice in another dish.

Purée of Onions.— Take some young button onions, peel them, and cut them fine; then fry them in good butter until they are of a delicate brown color; then take them from the fire and put them in a casserole with some good broth, some pieces of the finest white bread fried in butter, and the yolks of three hard–boiled eggs; let all cook together until well assimilated; then take it from the fire and strain, pressing it smoothly through the strainer with a wooden pestle; replace it on the fire, add some broth, and cook until it is of the consistency of cream; season to taste and serve.

Purée of Mushrooms.— Take some fresh mushrooms, wash, peel, and clean them thoroughly; slice them fine, dry them, and put them in a casserole with a piece of butter and the juice of a large lemon. When the butter is melted add some strong broth or stock, a glass of white wine (sherry or Madeira is best), and some bouillon; cook all together slowly, stirring continually with a wooden or silver spoon until thoroughly assimilated; then season, strain, and serve. It should be like thick cream.

Mutton Broth.— Four pounds of verylean mutton or lamb, cut into small pieces; one gallon of water; half a teacupful of rice; half a chicken, if the broth is intended to be very good.
     Boil the unsalted meat for two hours slowly in a covered vessel; soak the rice in enough warm water to cover it; and, at the end of this time, add it, water and all, to the boiling soup; cook an hour longer, stirring watchfully, from time to time, lest the rice should settle and adhere to the bottom of the pot; beat an egg into a froth and stir into a cup of cold milk, into which has been rubbed smoothly a tablespoonf ul of rice or wheat flour; mix with this, a little at a time, some of the scalding liquor until the egg is so cooked that there is no danger of its curdling in the soup; pour into the pot; when you have taken out the meat, season with thyme, pepper, and salt; boil up once and serve.

Olla Podrida.— One and a half pounds of mutton; one and a half pounds of veal; a slice of lean raw ham; one and a half pounds of black–eyed pease; any cold game or chicken.
     Put your meat, ham, and pease in a soup pot with sufficient water; simmer and skim; let it cook an hour; take out your meat; put into your bouillon whatever vegetables you wish (prepared beforehand); cook slowly; and before serving put in a piece of blood pudding; season with salt and pepper; serve your meats on one dish, your vegetables on another, with the following sauces: For summer vegetables–green pease, snap–beans, potatoes, etc.–serve a tomato sauce; for winter vegetables (cabbage excepted), a parsley sauce.

Oxtail Soup.— One oxtail; two pounds of lean beef; four carrots; three onions; thyme.
     Cut the tail into several pieces and fry brown in butter; slice the onions and two carrots and fry also; when done put them into a muslin bag with the thyme, and place in the soup pot with the beef and oxtail; grate the two whole carrots and cook all together, pouring over four quarts of cold water, and adding a pinch of burned sugar, and pepper and salt to taste; cook from four to six hours, in proportion to the size of the tail; strain fifteen minutes before serving it, and thicken with two tablespoonfuls of browned flour; boil ten minutes longer; add half a glass of burned sherry, and serve.

Brown Gravy Soup.— Three pounds of beef; one pound of fillet of beef; one carrot; one turnip; one head of celery; six button onions; three and a half quarts of water.
     Slice the onions, and fry to a light brown in butter; take them out and fry the meat in the same way, with the exception of the fillet. Chop the vegetables, and put them with the onions and fried beef into a covered pot; pour on the water and let all stew together for three hours; then add a pinch of sugar, salt and pepper to taste, and boil one hour longer, skimming carefully. In the meantime, free the piece of fillet entirely from strings, skin, and fat; chop it fine, and then pound it to a paste in a mortar, adding the tiniest possible soupçon of burned sugar, and salt to taste, and working it steadily until it is reduced to a cream; mix with this, drop by drop, a teacupful of the soup (strained); then strain the soup, put it back on the fire, and when it is at boiling–point add the fillet, stirring steadily all the time; allow the soup so thickened to boil up once; then put into the soup tureen, and serve.

Vermicelli Soup is made as above, omitting the fillet, and adding a handful of vermicelli, boiled separately and drained dry. The vermicelli so prepared should be put into the soup tureen, and the clear soup poured over it.

Pot au Feu.— Beef makes the most wholesome and best soup. Put your meat in cold water with a little salt; the fire should be so slow that the soup cannot boil before the skim rises and is carefully removed; add carrots, turnips, leeks, celery, parsley roots, a bay leaf, one or two cloves, a clove of garlic, and a fried onion to give color; let it boil slowly until the meat is done. To make good soup the most important thing is to keep it simmering without ceasing one moment. It requires from five to six hours to make a good pot au feu. The proper proportions are three pounds of meat for four quarts of water. When the soup is done, pour it boiling hot through the colander, over slices of bread in the tureen. Never boil bread in soup, as that spoils the flavor. The remains of game or poultry added to the beef is a good addition. A piece of the breast of mutton improves the taste, and can be served the following day broiled.

Cucido, Pot au Feu à la Portugaise.— Put into an earthen pot two pounds of beef, a piece of raw ham, a mutton bone, a chicken, two handfuls of beans parboiled; add five or six quarts of cold water; place the pot on the fire and watch it carefully, skimming the soup constantly; as soon as it begins to boil draw it on one side, placing it where it will simmer, but not boil; two hours later add a small cabbage (blanched), a soupçon of garlic, two large tomatoes peeled and sliced, a carrot peeled and sliced, and two or three cloves; an hour later add two smoked sausages. When the meats are cooked pour off the bouillon into another casserole and keep it hot. Meanwhile, put into another pot an onion, chopped fine and fried in butter to a light brown ; add to this a handful of rice, and fill the pot three quarters full of bouillon; cover, and cook slowly. When the rice is cooked add two tablespoonf nls of tomato sauce, and a teaspoonf ul of white pepper; put into a soup tureen, and pour over the rice the bouillon, which must previously have been carefully strained; arrange the soup meat, beef, ham, chicken, and sausage on a long oval dish; surround with the vegetables, and serve.

Puchero, Pot au Feu à la Espagnole.— Put into an earthen pot two pounds of breast of beef, a chicken cut up and fried to a light brown in butter, a pig's ear, a pound of lean ham, chopped fine, and three handfuls of parboiled beans; pour over all five quarts of water, and cook slowly, as above. When the soup has simmered two hours add a clove of garlic, an onion, a bunch of sorrel, and a pinch of thyme, a large head of lettuce, the same of celery, a large carrot, and half a cabbage (blanched); an hour later add a little okra, and continue to cook slowly. When about to serve, strain the bouillon through a sieve into a heated soup tureen; add some slices of bread browned, cut into dice and fried lightly in butter; add, also, the okra; arrange the meat and vegetables on an oval platter, and serve together with the soup.

Rosol, Pot au Feu à la Polonaise.— Put into an earthen pot a piece of breast of beef, the same of veal, a piece of bacon, the same of raw ham, and some vegetables; pour over all about five quarts of water, and cook slowly; two hours later add two small chickens, cut up, with their liver and lights; as soon as the chickens are cooked take them out of the pot, strain the bouillon, and pour two quarts of it into another casserole; allow this to come to a boil; and when at boiling–point add enough corn flour to thicken it to a cream; twenty–five minutes later skim the soup; pour into the heated soup tureen; add the chickens and ham chopped fine, and a pinch of chopped fennel.

French Pot au Feu (Soyer).— Six pounds of lean beef; four quarts of water; set near the fire and skim; when nearly boiling add a spoonful and a half of salt, half a pound of liver, two carrots, four turnips, eight young or two old leeks, one very large head of celery, two onions (one of them burned) with a clove in each, a piece of parsnip, and some sliced okra; skim again and simmer five hours, adding a little cold water now and then; take off the fat, put slices of bread into the tureen, lay half the vegetables over, and half the broth, and serve the meat (bouilli) separately with the other vegetables.

French Sheep's–Head Soup (Soyer).— One sheep's head and pluck boiled gently in a gallon of water till reduced to half the quantity; a small teacupful of pearl barley, six large onions, one turnip, one carrot, a bunch of sweet herbs, and a few cloves and peppercorns; add a little mushroom catsup, some chopped okra, and thicken with some browned flour rolled in butter. (It is better to make this soup the day before it is wanted.) Cut the meat off the head in slices and then into small squares, which must be put into the soup when it is warmed up for use; finish it up with a forcemeat and little egg balls, a teacupful of white wine, a little sliced lemon, and very little sugar. If properly made this soup is delicious.

Potage à la Crecy.— Wash, scrape, and slice carrots, turnips, celery, and onions; blanch them a quarter of an hour in boiling water; drain them; put them in a saucepan with a good piece of butter, some thin slices of ham, a little sugar; put over a moderate fire; moisten with bouillon; when well cooked take out the vegetables, put them in a mortar, pound them, and press them through a strainer, thinning them with the bouillon in which they were cooked; put this purée on the fire, and let it simmer slowly two hours; then skim it and pour it in the soup tureen, over fried croutons of bread, and serve hot.

Potage à la Condé.— Make a purée of red beans, well cooked with bouillon gras; pass it through a fine sieve and pour it over croutons of bread fried in butter.

Purée de Bœuf à la Russe.— Take a piece of the rump weighing about three pounds; cut off all the fat and skin, chop and pound it in a mortar, adding a very small piece of fresh butter, a tiny pinch of powdered sugar, and salt to taste; add, also, the yolks of three eggs, and mix all together until as smooth as cream; chop an onion, fry it lightly in butter, dust it with a little flour, and cook for an instant or two; then pour over it two quarts of strong beef bouillon colored a rich brown; the moment it begins to boil, set the casserole on the side of the fire, skim, and strain; twenty minutes after add the pounded beef, stirring carefully one way; let it cook (but not boil) for twenty minutes longer, then pour into the soup tureen, and serve. This is a splendid soup.

Potage à la Reine.— Put into the soup pot a chicken, a knuckle of veal, half a pound of breast of veal, salt slightly, and add five quarts of water, a small bunch of shallots and chivalry, half a head of celery, a turnip, a carrot, and some whole cloves; when it boils up add two or three handfuls of pearl barley, and continue to cook slowly, but steadily, until the meat is boiled to rags; then take out the meat and skim and strain the soup until it is thoroughly freed from grease; set the casserole containing the soup in a warm place on the stove, where the soup will keep hot but not boil; take the breasts of the chicken, chop, and pound them to a paste in a mortar; adding the yolks of eight eggs and one whole egg; also a glass of the thickest fresh cream; season with salt, nutmeg, and a pinch of sugar; then pass through a fine hair sieve and pour into a buttered mould; cook à bain–marie (the water rising to half the height of the mould) until of the proper consistency (i.e., like soft bread); when cold cut into small squares and arrange in a heated soup tureen, adding, also, the points of some white asparagus, cooked in water (the asparagus should be hot); pour over these the soup, and serve.

Purée of Sorrel.— Take a large quantity of sorrel, some chervil, several heads of the best lettuce, and some beet tops; wash, clean, pick, and rinse them thoroughly; then dry, and throw them into a porcelain–lined casserole with a large piece of butter, some small button onions, and some parsley; when the sorrel is almost cooked add some good bouillon, strain it, add the yolks of three eggs, and cook, stirring constantly until it assumes the consistency of cream; salt and pepper to taste.

Purée of Chestnuts.— Roast some large, fine chestnuts until you can peel and scrape them easily; then put them into a casserole with a large piece of the best butter, a large ladlef ul of strong broth, and half a tumbler of white wine; cook over a very slow fire until the soup assumes the consistency of cream; then salt, strain, and serve.

Spinach Soup à la Darcy.— Take two or three handfuls of spinach, wash clean, and boil with plenty of water and a little salt; strain off the water (when the spinach is thoroughly cooked) and work the spinach through a hair sieve; make a white sauce with butter, milk, or cream, and flour, pepper, and salt; then put the spinach into the sauce and put on the fire, and let it come to a boil; serve very hot. The more cream you put into it the better it will be. If not sufficiently green it can be colored with essence of spinach. (See receipts for essences, etc.)

Purée of Woodcock or Pigeons.— Roast the woodcock (or pigeons); skin, bone, and pound them in a mortar with a quantity of bread crumb fried in fresh butter, and the yolks of four hard–boiled eggs. When you have reduced all to the consistency of smooth paste add a ladleful of good broth, and strain into an earthen stewpan; add more broth, and a ladleful of beef juice; stir continually until the purée is smooth as velvet and thick as good cream; then salt slightly, and cook à bain–marie; just before taking it from the fire stir in a coffeespoonful of burned sugar, and a liqueur–glass of sherry.

White Soup for Supper.— One quart of new milk; one pint of fresh cream; one piece of lemon peel; one stick of celery; two laurel leaves; one lump of white sugar; one pinch of fine salt; three coriander seeds; one small stick of cinnamon; two ounces of sweet almonds; three bitter almonds — all blanched, pounded fine in a mortar, and then mixed with the cream–yolks of ten eggs beaten light.
     Boil the milk and all other ingredients, except the cream, almonds, and eggs, for a few minutes; set aside to cool; then strain and return to the fire in a stewpan; immediately mixing the cream, almonds, and eggs smoothly with it; stir till it thickens, and then pour over slices of French roll, which should be previously placed in the tureen; serve hot.

Mock Turtle Soup, No. 1.— Boil a sheep's head, with the liver and haslets. When thoroughly done, strain, remove the meat from the head, take out the brains, remove all the gristle from the haslets and liver; pound all this in a mortar to a paste; season with grated onions, pepper, and salt; bind with the yolks of eggs; make into balls, and fry; strain the bouillon in which the head has boiled, thicken with a little browned flour (brown your flour and mix to a paste with a little water), and stir it into the bouillon; a tablespoonful of allspice, one teaspoonful of cloves, one nutmeg, powdered and sifted; chop two hardboiled eggs into dice; add them with the forcemeat balls just before serving; pour,at the last moment,a teacupful of Madeira in the soup, and serve with sliced lemon.

Soup Stock, To Clear, No. 2 (" Boston Cook–book ").— "White and shell of one egg for every quart of stock.
     "Remove the fat, and mix the flavoring with the stock while it is quite cold; beat it well; then, and not until then, put the stock on the fire; add the white of egg and shell instantly, while the stock is still cold; stir steadily and uninterruptedly until the stock is very hot to keep the egg from settling; then leave it and let it boil ten minutes. By this time a thick scum will have formed; set the stock back on the stove, and add half a cup of cold water; let it stand ten minutes, while you prepare your jar, colander, and fine napkin ready for straining; wring a fine napkin out of hot water, and lay it over the colander (which should be placed on the jar); put the finest wire strainer on the napkin, and then pour it all through; do this slowly, and do not squeeze the napkin at any stage of the process."
     The author of the "Boston Cook–book" advises that soup should never be skimmed, and is undoubtedly right in so advising.

Potage à la Reine d'Angleterre (" Boston Cook–book "). — Remove the fat from one quart of the water in which a chicken has been boiled to rags; season highly with celery salt and white pepper, also a little onion, and put on to boil; mash the yolks of three hard–boiled eggs fine, and mix with half a cup of bread or cracker crumbs, which have been soaked until soft in a little milk; chop the white meat of a chicken until fine like meal, and stir it into the egg–and–bread paste; add one pint of hot cream slowly, and then rub all into the hot chicken liquor; boil five minutes; add more salt if needed, and if too thick add more cream; or, if not thick enough, add more fine cracker dust. It should be like a purée.


FISH.

A FISH TABLE FOR THE NORTHERN STATES.


Fish, to Choose.— In choosing flounders, see that the pale side has the appearance of white earthenware. If clear and curly, the fish is not good.
     Bass should be sounded over the back. If the back sinks about the second dorsal fin, do not buy it. Bass, if gutted at once, and hung by the head in a cool place, will remain good for two or three days without salt.
     Eels are fresh when their skin is full; if wrinkled, they are stale. Pickerel should have an olive–tinted skin, and golden spots. If the coloring be pale and faded, the pickerel are stale. Trout should have a small head, thick shoulders, and a general splendor of coloring. If pale in color, they are stale. Salmon should be round and broad, even to the tail. If covered with parasitical insects, that is a sure sign of its having just come out of the water, and of a very high condition of excellence. As long as the scales are resplendent and silvery the fish are in a good, eatable state; just as soon as a coppery hue appears they are no longer fit to eat. In choosing "crimped salmon," see that the flesh rises at the edges of the cuts, disclosing firm, elastic flakes. When the fish is stale, the gills turn brown, and dishonest fishmongers stain them with blood; but this trick is easily detected by those who are aware of it. Always buy crabs and lobsters alive, heavy, and lively.

Salt Fish, to Choose.—Salt cod should be perfectly dry, not hard to the touch, and completely free from spots or mildew. Dried salmon should be thick and full–backed, and the flesh of a deep pink color. If dim red, this color has been given by saltpetre to a colorless, unhealthy fish. Red herring should shine like burnished metal, and be very stiff; if they are dull, soft, or broken, they are not good.
     All fish kept in pickle should be clean in appearance and firm and elastic to the touch.

Fish, to Clean.— Fish should be carefully and thoroughly cleaned, but should be lightly and rapidly handled, or the flesh will lose its firmness and delicacy. After being thoroughly and quickly washed under a pipe of running water, it should be hung by the head until every drop is drained off. Never leave fish lying in water.
     Cod should be very carefully cleaned, all the interstices of the backbone being freed from blood either with a knife or a small brush. Unless this is done the blood turns black in boiling, producing a most disgusting appearance.
     Rays, and all fishes of that class, should be skinned as soon after they are dead as possible. If the skin does not come off readily, dip the fish in boiling water.
     Fish that are to be opened down the back are best split from nose to tail.
     In cleaning flatfish, open them considerably, otherwise it is hard to extract the whole of the intestines; and it is this neglect which makes the abdominal parts of flatfish have such an unpleasant, muddy taste.

General Directions for Boiling.— Large fish are generally boiled, and it is well to add a little salt, vinegar, and horseradish to the water, as the addition not only prevents the skin of the fish from breaking, but really improves the flavor. Large fish must be boiled slowly. The head and shoulders of the cod are the parts generally best for boiling. It is best to bind them with broad tape. When sufficiently cooked, the flesh will leave the backbone white and flaky, the skin rises up, and the eyes turn white. The sounds, the jelly parts about the jowl, the palate, and the tongue, are esteemed rare delicacies by the epicures in fish.
     Salmon, also, if it be a large fish, is best boiled in portions. After it has been a minute in the boiling water, lift the drain and let the water flow off. Repeat this several times, and it will cause the card to set, and the fish to eat more crisply. The thinnest part of salmon is the fattest, and consequently the best part. Some epicures, notably William Henry Herbert, recommend for boiling salmon "a kettle screeching with intense heat, and filled with brine strong enough to bear an egg."

Brook Trout are generally fried or broiled, but the lake trout found in Hamilton County, Seneca Lake, etc., are best boiled.

Frying FishGeneral Directions.— Small fish are usually best fried. The fire should always be clear and fierce, and the pan must not be too old, or the fish will stick to it. Beef drippings is the best thing in which to fry fish, and plenty of it must be used. The drippings must be so hot that a piece of bread dropped into it will brown instantly.
     In frying herring or shad, score them three or four times across the body into the very backbone. This mode of treatment causes the flesh to be more crisp and firm. After the fish are fried they should be laid on a soft cloth before the fire, and turned every two or three minutes till dry on both sides. It is well to keep old linen table–cloths cut up for this purpose.

Fried Catfish.— Skin, clean, remove the heads, sprinkle with salt, and lay aside for an hour and a half. Then dip in beaten eggs, roll in bread or cracker crumbs, and fry quickly in hot lard or drippings.

Stewed Catfish.— Skin, clean, remove the heads, salt, and set aside, as for frying. After two hours arrange them in a saucepan, cover with cold water, and stew gently for half an hour or longer, according to their size. Put into the saucepan a chopped shallot, a bunch of chopped parsley, a little pepper, a tablespoonful of browned flour mixed to a paste with cold water, and a heaping tablespoonful of butter. Boil up once, take out the fish carefully, and lay in a deep dish. Boil up again, pour over the fish, and serve.

Brandade de Morue.— Soak your codfish until it becomes flaky; drain it well (for this dish you always use a salt cod; shred your fish; pound it piece by piece in a mortar with a little clove of well–pounded garlic; stir into it (always stirring the same way, and drop by drop) a glass of olive–oil. Then put your fish in a saucepan on a slow fire, and continue to stir in the oil drop by drop; add occasionally a little sweet milk, until the fish has the consistency of cream cheese. Serve it in a dish surrounded by croutons of bread fried in butter.

Codfish à la Provençale.— Boil and drain your fish; take a dish you can set on the fire, slice some eschalottes and an onion; chop up some parsley; add a little olive–oil and a piece of butter as large as an egg. Lay your fish in this; cover it with a layer of this same dressing; season with salt and pepper; cover with bread crumbs, and bake with fire above and below.

Fresh Codfish, Boiled.— Lay the fish in cold water slightly salted for half an hour; wipe it dry; wrap it in a clean linen cloth well floured, stitched to the shape of the fish, and put it into the fish–kettle with water enough to cover it. The water should be slightly salted. Boil briskly, allowing an hour from the time the water fairly boils for a piece of cod weighing three pounds. If boiled without the cloth, half an hour. Drain, and serve on a very hot dish with old–fashioned egg sauce; garnish with parsley and slices of hard–boiled eggs.

Salt Codfish, Boiled.— Put the fish to soak in lukewarm water for at least sixteen or seventeen hours before cooking. Change the water after two hours, then again after nine hours, washing off the salt. Two hours before dinner take out the cod, remove any crystal of salt adhering to it, and plunge into very cold water. Finally, set over the fire with enough lukewarm water to cover it, and boil half an hour; drain well, serve on a hot dish with sliced beets and hard–boiled eggs; drench with egg sauce and serve.

Codfish Balls.— Prepare the fish precisely as for boiling whole. When duly washed and soaked, cut into pieces, and boil twenty minutes more; drain very dry, and spread upon a dish to cool. When cold, pick to pieces with a fork, removing every vestige of skin and bone, and shredding very fine; add an equal bulk of mashed potatoes, a beaten egg, a lump of butter, and a little rich milk; flour your hands, form the codfish into round, flat cakes, and fry in good drippings to a light brown. Desiccated codfish is equally good, more quickly prepared, and as cheap.

Salt Codfish, Stewed with Eggs.— Prepare as for balls. Heat almost to boiling a pint of rich, sweet milk, and stir into it gradually three eggs well beaten, a tablespoonful of butter, a little chopped parsley and butter, and, lastly, the fish; boil'up once, and turn into a deep dish lined with buttered toast.

Codfish Pie.— Take a piece of the middle of a small cod; salt it well one night; next day wash it, and season with pepper, salt, and a very little nutmeg, mixed; put it into a deep dish with a little butter and good broth; cover with a crust, making an aperture in the crust, and, when the pie is baked, pour in through this aperture a sauce composed of one spoonful of stock, a quarter of a pint of cream, a little flour and butter, a grate of lemon and nutmeg, and, if obtainable, some oysters. The sauce should be allowed to boil up once before being poured into the pie.

Shrimp Pie.— A quart of shrimps well picked. If very salt season them with only mace and a clove or two; skin, bone, and mince two or three anchovies; mix these with the spice, and then season the shrimps; put some butter in the bottom of a dish and cover the shrimps with a glass of sharp white wine. The paste must be light and thin. Bake in a quick oven.

Chowder, Massachusetts.— Five pounds of bass or cod cut into strips an inch thick and three long; six large onions fried in the gravy of fried pork; oysters; three cups of oyster liquor; oyster crackers, well soaked in milk, and thickly buttered.
     Line the bottom of the pot with a layer of fish; scatter upon this a few slices of the fried onion, some salt, half a dozen whole black peppers, a clove or two, a pinch of thyme, and one of parsley, a tablespoonful of mushroom catsup, and six oysters; then a layer of the soaked and buttered oyster crackers; then fish, etc. Repeat the order already given until the pot is full; cover with water, and, as the water boils, add the oyster liquor. This is delicious chowder.

Chowder, Rhode Island.— Four pounds of cod or sea bass, cut into pieces four inches square; one pound of salt pork, cut into strips, and soaked in hot water five minutes.
     Cover the bottom of the chowder pot with a layer of the pork; place on this a layer of fish, then a layer of chopped onions, a little summer savory, parsley, and cayenne; then a layer of split cream crackers, moistened with warm water; above this lay a stratum of pork; and then again fish, onions, seasoning, and crackers. Repeat this order until the dish is full; let the last layer of crackers be well buttered; pour in barely enough water to cover all; cover the pot; stew gently for an hour, watching that the water does not sink too low. Should it leave the upper layer exposed, replenish carefully from the boiling teakettle; when thoroughly cooked take out the chowder and put into the tureen; thicken the gravy with a tablespoonful of flour and the same of butter; boil up once, and pour over the chowder.

St. James's Club Chowder.— Six slices of good pickled pork, fried brown on both sides; seven pounds of tautog, dressed, with the heads on, and each fish cut into three pieces; pepper and salt to taste; plenty of onions, sliced and chopped; two pounds of sea biscuits; one quart bottle of the best champagne; one tumblerful of port wine.
     Fry the pork in a deep dinner–pot; when fried take out the pork, leaving the drippings, and put on the drippings as many pieces of fish as will make a smooth layer; throw on the fish three handfuls of onions; salt and pepper to taste; then put on the six slices of pork; then the rest of the fish; then, again, a layer of onions; pepper and salt to taste; then pour on just enough water to cover all; put the cover on the pot; place it on the fire; let it boil gently and slowly for thirty minutes. It is to Boil, actually boil thirty minutes, and should at all events cook until the onion is soft; put in at this point a quart bottle of the best champagne, a tumblerful of equally good port wine, and two pounds of sea biscuits, soaked for a moment or two in boiling water; then stir up all with a long spoon, and let all boil again for five minutes; then taste, add pepper and salt if necessary, and dish. Potatoes may be eaten with chowder, but should always be boiled in a separate pot.

Clam Chowder.— Five or six slices of fat pork, fried crisp, and chopped fine; sprinkle in the bottom of a pot; place on the pork a layer of clams; sprinkle with cayenne pepper and salt, and scatter bits of butter thickly over all; then have a layer of chopped onions, then one of small crackers, split and moistened with warm milk; over all this pour a little of the fat left in the pan in which the pork is fried; then proceed as above until the pot is full, or nearly so; cover with water and stew, closely covered, for three quarters of an hour; drain off all the liquor that will flow freely; and when you have turned the chowder into the tureen, pour the gravy back into the pot; thicken with cracker crumbs, browned and rolled; add a glass of sherry wine, some catsup, and spiced sauce; boil up once and pour over the chowder.

Scallops, Fried.— If you do not buy the scallops prepared, boil them and take out the hearts. The heart is the only part fit for frying or stewing. Dip in beaten egg, roll in crumbs, and fry in hot lard or dripping.

Raw Clams.— The small Little Neck clams are excellent raw; serve in the shell, as you do raw oysters.

Roast Clams.— Proceed as for roast oysters.

Clam Fritters.— Twelve clams, chopped fine; one pint of milk; three eggs.
     Pour the liquor from the clams into the milk; add to this the beaten eggs, salt and pepper to taste, and flour enough to make a thin batter; fry in hot lard by tablespoonfuls.

Scalloped Clams.— Chop the clams fine, and season with pepper and salt; then place in another dish some rolled bread crumbs, moistened with milk, clam liquor, and melted butter; stir the clams into this; then serve in pattypans, or clean buttered clam shells, after baking in the oven.

Courtbouillon à la Créole, No. 1.— Slice and fry some onions in a saucepan; add slices of tomatoes, salt, and pepper; clean and scale your fish; cut it in slices; put it in the saucepan with the onions and tomatoes and some water; add a little chopped parsley; cook till the fish is done; then add a glass of claret or white wine, whichever you prefer; let it boil up, and take out the slices of fish; place each slice on a piece of toasted bread, skim the sauce and pour over, and serve.

Créole Courtbouillon for Fish, No. 2.— Clean your fish and draw it through the gills; put it in a fish boiler; cover it well with water; add a glass of vinegar, salt, pepper, clove, laurel leaf, onions and carrots sliced, thyme, and parsley; let it boil until the fish is done; remove the fish boiler to the back of the stove, and leave your fish in the courtbouillon till you are ready to serve it. The same courtbouillon can serve as often as it keeps good. You can substitute wine for vinegar—using half wine and half water.
     Fish au courtbouillon should be served very hot on a folded napkin on a dish surrounded by bunches of parsley.

Creole Courtbouillon for Sea Fish, No. 3. — Boil in half water and half milk; salt and pepper. The fish becomes white and firm. Serve with highly seasoned sauces.

Stuffed Crabs à la Créole.— Boil your hard–shell crabs; remove the shells; take out the sand bag and the spongy substances from the sides; take out the meat and fat carefully, and chop them up with chopped onions, minced ham, bread crumbs, butter or oils, suet, and plenty of red pepper; bind it with beaten yolk of egg, and fry it well; clean the upper shell of the crab, and stuff it with this crab stuffing; sprinkle over a little bread crumbs (powdered); put on each stuffed crab a lump of butter, and return it to the stove to bake a few minutes, and serve.
     Crab Croquettes are made in the same manner; serve in silver scallop shells, or powder them with bread crumbs, and fry them in boiling lard or oil.
     Croquettes of lobster may be made in the same manner.

Soft–shell Crabs (Italian Monastery).— Take some tender, healthy, living crabs; wash and clean them thoroughly, and put them in a deep dish, pan, or bowl which you have previously filled with fresh milk or cream in which two or three eggs are beaten up; leave the crabs in this for two hours, in which time they will probably have eaten all the milk and egg, and be so fat as to be quite torpid and motionless; then dip them in beaten egg, roll them in bread crumbs, and fry quickly in butter; garnish with fried parsley, pour a little lemon juice over them, and serve.

Roast Codfish (Monastery of Certosa).— Take a large, fresh codfish; remove the head, scales, fins, and tail; open and clean it thoroughly; sprinkle the inside thinly and evenly with white pepper, powdered parsley, two large truffles very thinly sliced, one very small onion thinly sliced, some grated and browned bread crumbs; moisten the whole with melted butter, in which you have beaten up a teaspoonful of any piquant bottled sauce. This done, roll up the codfish tightly and neatly, binding it firmly with twine, again bathing it thoroughly with the melted butter, prepared as above, and covering it with grated bread crumbs. This done, put it on the spit, and roast it before a clear, slow fire for an hour, basting it frequently with the melted butter and browned bread crumbs. When cooked place it in a very hot dish, pour over it the remainder of the sauce with which it was basted, and the juice of two lemons; sprinkle it with a little grated parsley, garnish with alternate slices of lemon and pickled beets, and serve. It will be found delicious. Plain boiled potatoes should be served with it.

Roast Sturgeon (Italian Monastery).— Prepare a sauce in the following manner: Put into a casserole a large piece of good butter, a pinch of flour (browned), salt, pepper, parsley, onion, sweet herbs, spice, and a tiny piece of red pepper. The casserole should previously have been rubbed with garlic. Add to the mixture a large glass of cold water and half a glass of the best vinegar; let all cook together, stirring it continually, either with a silver or a wooden spoon. When the mixture is thoroughly assimilated take it from the fire, and as soon as it is lukewarm, drop into it the thick slices of sturgeon. They must, of course, have been previously thoroughly cleaned and trimmed. Leave the pieces of sturgeon in the above–named sauce for three hours or more; then take them out, let them drain, put them on the spit, and let them roast before a slow fire, basting them continually with the sauce; arrange in a very hot dish, when cooked, and garnish with slices of lemon.

Mullets or Small Fish à la Livornese.— Choose small red mullets or other pan fish, taking care that they should not be more than four or five inches long. When thoroughly cleaned arrange them in an earthen stewpan with a tiny pinch of garlic, the very finest quality of olive–oil (or good butter), a little fennel, parsley, and thyme; when partly cooked add a fair quantity of good tomato sauce. Before serving sprinkle well with the finest grated and browned bread crumbs.

Mullets, White Bait, or other Pan Fish, with Sauce Piquante.— Arrange, as before, in an earthen stewpan, putting in delicate young onions finely chopped, and a sufficient quantity of the best olive–oil (or good butter); moistening all with broth, or, better still, with fish broth, and a glass of sweet white wine. Just before serving add to this any kind of sauce piquante. (Very good.)

Carp à la Chambord.— Take a large, fine, male carp; cleanse thoroughly, bone, and stuff with a mixture of minced fish, butter, bread crumbs, and grated parsley; then cover it with thin slices of ham and fat bacon, wrap it in well–buttered white paper, and bind the whole neatly and firmly with thread; place it in a fish kettle with two or three glasses of good white wine, delicate young onions chopped fine, thyme, laurel, celery seed, spices, salt, and pepper, taking care every now and then to baste and turn the fish so that it may be thoroughly soaked and impregnated by the sauce. It should boil slowly for an hour, with fire below and above it; then take it from the fire, let it drain, remove carefully the paper and threads, and arrange the carp daintily in a very hot dish ; garnishing it with tiny fish, truffles, slices'of lemon, prawns, crawfish, slices of fried bread cut into pretty shapes, etc., pour' round it the best kind of white sauce, to which has been added the sauce in which it was cooked. It should be served very hot.

Stewed Eels.— Skin and clean the eels, carefully extracting the fat from the inside; cut into lengths of an inch and a half, put into a saucepan with enough cold water to cover them, throw in a little salt and chopped parsley, and stew slowly, carefully covered, for an hour; add, at the last, a large tablespoonful of butter, the same of browned flour mixed with cold water, a wineglassful of sherry, and a quarter of a lemon cut into the thinnest possible slices.

Fried Eels.— Prepare as for stewing, roll in flour, and fry in hot lard or butter to a fine brown.

Lobsters Boiled.— Lobsters for boiling should be lively, and not too large. Tie the claws together, put a handful of salt in the boiling water, and plunge in your lobster; boil from half an hour to an hour, according to size; when done remove from the pot, and lay–face downward–on a sieve to dry; when cold split open the body and tail, extract the meat from the claws, and throw away the lady fingers and the head.

Lobster Croquettes.— The meat of a well–boiled lobster chopped fine, and seasoned with pepper, salt, and powdered mace; mix this with a quarter of the quantity of rolled bread crumbs, and two tablespoonfuls of melted butter; make into oval balls; roll these in beaten egg, then in cracker crumbs, then fry in butter; serve very hot.

Lobster à la Bordelaise.— Boil your lobster in water with three tablespoonfuls of vinegar, slices of carrots, onions, a bay leaf, a clove of garlic, salt, and pepper; let it boil a few moments; take off the shell and cut it across in eight pieces; break the claws and put them in a saucepan with some white wine, a soup bunch, salt, and pepper; cover the saucepan and let it simmer ten minutes; fry some chopped onions in butter in another saucepan, add a spoonful of flour, make a roux, and pour it in the saucepan in which you have cooked the lobster claws; let it cook a few minutes, stirring continually with a wooden spoon; add two tablespoonfuls of tomato sauce, and cayenne pepper; put your slices of lobster in this, let them warm through, and serve hot.

Hot Lobster (William Makepeace Thackeray).— Pull about three pounds of boiled lobster to pieces with two silver forks; make a sauce of mustard, vinegar, tomato catsup, and plenty of cayenne pepper and salt; put lobster, sauce, and half a pound of good fresh butter into a chafing–dish; close or cover the chafing–dish tightly, and when the lobster begins to cook, open the chafing–dish and stir quickly with a silver spoon; cook twenty minutes, if necessary; and two minutes before blowing out the fire under the chafing–dish, open it for a moment, and throw in a wineglassful of good sherry, stirring quickly, as before. "This is a dish fit for an emperor."

Potted Lobster.— Half boil the lobsters, pick out the meat, cut into small bits, season with mace, white pepper, nutmeg, and salt, press close into an earthenware pot, cover with butter, bake half an hour, and put the spawn in ; when cold take the lobster out, and pack into small jars with a little of the butter; beat the other butter in a mortar with some of the spawn; then mix that colored butter with as much as will be sufficient to cover the pots, and strain it. Cayenne may be added if approved.

Curry of Lobsters or Prawns.— Parboil, take them from the shells, and lay in a pan with a small piece of mace, three or four spoonfuls of veal gravy, and four of cream; rub smooth one or two teaspoonfuls of curry–powder, a teaspoonful of flour, and an ounce of butter; simmer an hour; salt to taste, and squeeze in the juice of half a lemon.

Cold Boiled Salmon.— May be made into croquettes, mayonnaise, a stew of potatoes and salmon, or, better still, devilled—following Thackeray's receipt for devilled lobster.

Boiled Halibut.— Lay in cold salt and water for an hour; wipe dry, and score the skin in squares; put into the kettlcwith cold salted water enough to cover it; let it heat gradually, and boil from half to three quarters of an hour; drain and serve on a very hot dish, with sauce Hollondaise or any other sauce you prefer.
     Cold boiled halibut may be treated like cold boiled salmon. (See receipts above.)

Baked Halibut.— A piece of halibut weighing five or six pounds; soak in salt and water for two hours; wipe dry and score the skin in squares; bake in a tolerably hot oven for an hour, basting often with butter and water; test with a silver fork; if the fork penetrate easily it is done. It should be of a fine brown. Add to the gravy in the dripping–pan a tablespoonful of walnut catsup, the juice of a lemon, and a teaspoonful of Worcestershire sauce; thicken with browned flour, boil up once, and pour over the halibut; serve in a very hot dish.

Cold Devilled Halibut ("Common–Sense in the Household").— One pound of cold boiled or baked halibut, minced very fine, and mixed with the yolks of three eggs rubbed to a paste with rich cream; two teaspoonfuls of white sugar (sifted); one teaspoonful of salt; one teaspoonful of made mustard; one teaspoonful of Worcestershire sauce; a soupçon of anchovy paste; a small teacupful of celery vinegar.
     Work all this smoothly into a rich dressing, with enough cream to give it the consistency of mayonnaise; stir it into the minced fish; heap in a mound, and garnish with curled lettuce, whites of eggs cut into rings, and rounds of pickled beets.

Mamie's Scalloped Halibut.— Boil the fish, and when quite cold shred finely; make a rich sauce as follows: Yolk of one egg, beaten up with two tablespoonfuls of sifted flour; half a pint of rich milk.
     Put into a saucepan, and stir constantly over the fire until smooth and thick; do not let it boil; add salt to taste, a little black pepper, and cayenne; butter a deep dish, and put in alternate layers of fish and sauce; cover the top with rolled bread crumbs, dot with bits of butter, and bake for half an hour.

Halibut Steaks.— Clean the fish, skin, and cut into neat slices; season with salt and pepper,dip in beaten egg,and roll in finely rolled bread crumbs; fry in boiling lard to a light brown; arrange in a circle on a dish, and pour a rich cream sauce in the middle.

Boiled Mackerel.— Clean the mackerel, and wipe carefully with a dry, clean cloth; wash them lightly with another cloth dipped in vinegar; wrap in a coarse linen cloth, floured, basted closely to the shape of the fish; put into a pot, cover with salted water, and boil gently half an hour; drain well, and serve on a hot dish with egg sauce, or any sauce you prefer.

Broiled Mackerel (Salt).— Soak over–night in lukewarm water; change this early in the morning for very cold, and let it lie in this until it is time to cook; then clean thoroughly, and wipe quite dry; split open and lay on a buttered gridiron over a clear fire; when it begins to brown turn the other side; lay on 'a hot dish, butter plentifully, and cover for a few moments.

Roast Pike.— Prepare and draw your fish, lard it well, split it, baste it while roasting with white wine, vinegar, or lemon juice, and serve it with a rich sauce, in which you chop up some oysters and anchovies.

Fried Carp.— Scale and draw a fine carp; split it down the back; put aside the fat and the eggs; steep your carp in vinegar, with thyme, laurel leaf, nutmeg, salt, and pepper; take it out, dry it in a towel, sprinkle with a little flour, and fry in boiling lard. When it is nearly done throw the fat and eggs, also sprinkled with flour, into the frying–pan, and let them fry a good color; sprinkle fine salt over your fish; dress the fat and eggs on the dish with the fish; serve, garnished with fried parsley and slices of lemon.

Broiled Mackerel, No. 1.— Prepare and clean your fish; sprinkle it with salt and pepper, envelop it in buttered paper, broil it on a gridiron, and serve it with a maitre d'hôtel sauce.

Broiled Mackerel à la Créole, No. 2.— Clean and prepare your fish j split it in the back; wrap it in oiled paper, and broil it on the gridiron. Just before serving, remove the paper, and put in the fish a lump of fresh butter, in which you have kneaded some parsley, salt, and pepper. The heat of the fish melts the butter.

Stuffed Trout.— Prepare your fish; make a stuffing of mushrooms, scraps of fish, crumbs of bread, onions, salt, and pepper, chopped up with butter. Stuff your fish with this; tie them up carefully, and cook them in a courtbouillon; drain them, and let them cool; dip them twice in beaten eggs; fry them, and serve with it tomato sauce.

Fricandeau of Fish.— Lard some slices of any firm fish; sprinkle with flour, and fry them slightly in lard. Put some veal broth in a saucepan with some mushrooms, truffles, fine herbs, artichoke bottoms, and slices of celery; let it cook till done; skim, add a little lemon juice. Arrange your slices of fish in a dish, and pour over this sauce.

Salt Fish (Spanish fashion).— Take any kind of very salt fish, soak for twenty–four hours, skin, bone, and pick into small flakes; then boil until soft, and set aside to cool. Slice finely a couple of onions, fry them in butter until they begin to color; add some tomato sauce, a soupçon of pepper, and the salt fish. Let the whole simmer on a slow fire for a couple of hours, shaking the saucepan occasionally.

Baked Mullet.— Scale and trim the fish, and put it into a frying–pan; season with pepper and salt; cover with chopped onions and mushrooms; moisten with a wineglassful of sherry and a little butter; bake it over a slow fire for twenty minutes if a medium–sized fish; keep well basting in the liquor, and turn now and then; dish up very carefully. Make a sauce with half a glassful of sherry, a teaspoonful of chopped parsley, and twelve drops of anchovy sauce. Reduce the gravy to one half by boiling, and pour over the fish.

Oysters, to Feed.— Put them into water, and wash with a birch besom until quite clean; then lay them round, side downwards, in a pan; sprinkle with flour or oatmeal and salt, and cover with water; do the same every day and they will fatten. The water should be pretty salt, and rather more so than sea water. Bay salt is the best for the purpose when it is at hand.

Oyster Loaves.— Open the oysters; save their liquor, strain it, and then put the oysters to stew in it with a very little butter and flour, white pepper, a pinch of nutmeg, and a little cream; stew till tender, and then cut the oysters into dice and stuff small hollowed rolls of bread with them; put on a hot dish; pour over the rolls the sauce in which the oysters were cooked, and serve.

Raw Oysters.— Raw oysters when first served for a dinner which is carved on the table should be placed in their shells, on a block of ice, in the centre of the table.
     When the dinner is carved and served from side tables, the oysters should be served in small plates of ice, of course in their shells. Raw oysters are never removed from their shells. These plates should be placed on folded napkins. If the ice plates cannot be obtained, oyster plates should be used. Sliced lemon should be invariably served with oysters, but no sauce of any kind. The serving of raw oysters on ice, is, of course, a matter of taste. Oyster plates are equally available, and in the opinion of many dinner–givers much prettier, but the oysters should always be kept on the ice beforehand.

Oyster Patties.—Stew the oysters, as for oyster stew, taking care, however, to make the sauce much thicker. Have ready some small shells of puff paste which have been heated on a tin. Fill these shells with the oysters, set for a moment in the oven, and serve very hot.

Oyster Fritters.— Drain the liquor from the oysters, and add to it an equal quantity of milk (in the proportion of cup to cup), three eggs, a little salt, and flour enough for a thin batter. Have ready in the frying pan a few spoonfuls of boiling lard; try it, to be assured that it is suffiently hot, and drop the oyster batter in by the spoonful; fry quickly a light brown; drain on white paper, and send to table.

Cream Oysters on Half–shell.— Cook together à bain–marie one cup of oyster juice, one of milk, and one of cream, with a little salt. When it boils, stir in two table spoonfuls of butter, a little salt, and some white pepper; have ready some fine large oyster shells, washed and buttered, and with a fine oyster in each; range them closely in a large baking–pan; take the cream from the fire, and stir in two tablespoonfuls of rice flour mixed with cold milk; replace the casserole on the fire, stir very hard; remove from the fire, and fill up the oyster shells with the cream; bake five or six minutes in the oven after the shells become warm.

Roast Oysters.— Wash and wipe the shells, and lay them in a quick oven, or on the top of the stove. When they open they are done. Pile on a large dish and send to table. Remove the upper shell with a knife; season with pepper, salt, and butter, or milk.
     Or, open while raw, leaving the oysters on the lower shells; lay in a large baking–pan, and roast in their shells, adding butter, pepper, and salt, before serving.

Oyster Omelette.— One dozen of large oysters, chopped fine; six eggs, well beaten; two ounces of melted butter; pepper and salt to taste.
     Mix a teaspoonful of flour with milk enough to make it smooth, and beat it into melted butter; then add the eggs, oysters, and seasoning, beating all well together; fry like any other omelette, and, just before it is put into the pan, add a teaspoonful of chopped parsley in a tablespoonf nl of melted butter.

Oyster Pie.— One quart of oysters; one cup of milk; two eggs, well beaten; two spoonfuls of butter; salt, pepper, and nutmeg. Bake in a deep dish, in a good rich crust.

Baltimore Oyster Pie.— Make a puff paste of one pound of butter, flaked into one pound of sifted flour, wet to a stiff dough with ice water, and rolled out on a marble slab, or in a very cold room. Handle it as little as possible. Line the sides of a deep dish, holding more than two quarts, with this paste. Having stripped the oysters, season them thoroughly with pepper, salt, and a blade or two of mace; cut up six ounces of butter into little bits, and stir through the oysters, with half a teacupful of grated bread; then strain the oyster liquor carefully, and put all into a dish; cover it with paste, rolled about one fourth of an inch thick, with an opening in the centre; cut out with a cake cutter, or jagging iron, ornamental bits of paste, and arrange around the edge, and above the opening; bake in a hot oven, from half to three quarters of an hour. If the crust browns too quickly cover with paper. Just before the pie is done pour in a teacupful of cream through the aperture in the top. Two quarts of oysters make a good pie.

Fricasseed Oysters.— Scald fifty oysters in their own juice, carefully skimming off the scum. Strain off and reject the juice; put the oysters into a hot covered tureen, and set it aside in a warm place; rub well together six ounces of butter; three tablespoonfuls of flour, with as much scalding milk, into a fine, smooth paste; stir this mixture into a quart of hot milk in a stewpan on the fire; season it with salt and pepper, and a very little ground allspice and mace; stir it until it thickens; then stir in four well–beaten yolks of eggs, taking care that the mixture is not hot enough to curdle the eggs; pour this over the oysters in the baking–dish; cover them thickly with fresh bread crumbs, and brown in a quick oven.

Scalloped Oysters.— Put a layer of bread crumbs with butter in the bottom of a dish; then a layer of oysters, and so on, alternating, until the dish is full. Use pepper, and, if the oysters are fresh, salt; when the dish is full, add a gill of wine; bake twenty minutes.

Scalloped Oysters on the Half–shell.— the deep sides of large oyster shells with oysters and bread or cracker crumbs, prepared with small bits of butter, and spices and salt to taste; place the shells in a pan, and bake them a short time in the oven. Clams, with the hard parts removed, may be treated in the same manner.

Fried Oysters.— Use only the largest oysters for frying. Wipe them dry with a cloth; dip each one separately into beaten egg and cracker, or stale bread crumbs, or Indian meal; fry quickly in boiling lard.

Oyster Salad.— Strain the juice of the oysters, and boil it; when boiling, throw in the oysters, well washed, and let them become plump; then drain them thoroughly into a colander. When perfectly cold put them into a salad bowl, and cover them with a rich, creamy salad dressing.

Boiled Oysters.— Wash the oysters very clean; put them in a wire basket, and immerse the basket in a pot of boiling water. The moment the shells open, remove the basket from the water; take off the upper shells, and serve them on large dishes, hot, in the lower shell.

To Broil Oysters.— Select the largest and finest oysters. Dry them in a towel, and season them with pepper and salt; lay them inside of 'a folding wire broiler; turn the broiler frequently from side to side to keep the juice from flowing out; have ready a very hot dish, and, as you place the oysters upon it, put little pieces of butter on them, and serve at once.

Steamed Oysters.— Drain the oysters well, washing each one in the liquor to remove the pieces of shell; put them in a tin plate inside of a steamer already placed over a pot of water that is boiling; cover the steamer tight with its lid, and have the oysters in the hot steam until they puff up and curl. Serve on a hot covered dish, with butter, salt, and pepper.

Panned Oysters.— Drain the oysters, and put them on the fire in a hot place, with pepper and salt. When the oysters are puffed, pour them into a hot dish with some lumps of butter.

Griddled Oysters.— Take the largest and finest oysters; dry them in a cloth; heat the griddle as for baking cakes, and grease it; have close to the fire a dish with butter, pepper, and salt in it; lay the oysters on the griddle, they will brown almost immediately; brown on both sides, and drop them in the dish with the butter; the juice will soon flow and make the gravy.

Mince Oysters.— Mince twenty–five oysters fine in their own liquor; stir in bread crumbs, olive–oil, salt, pepper, and vinegar; put alternate layers of the mince, and soda cracker wet with wine, into a deep dish, and bake until nicely browned.

Stewed Oysters, No. 1.— Fifty oysters; two ounces of butter; 'a small tablespoonful of flour; half a pint of cream; a little nutmeg; a very little mace; cayenne and white pepper to taste.
     Put the butter and flour into a stewpan, and stir well together until quite thick, but do not let them boil for more than a minute, then add the cream, nutmeg, mace, and pepper; stir hard for four or five minutes; then add fifty oysters drained from their liquor. When cooked, just as you take them from the fire, add the yolks of two eggs, well beaten.

Stewed Oysters, No. 2.— One hundred oysters; a little salt; one large blade of mace; a quarter of a pound of butter; a little sifted flour; one teacupful of cream; a saltspoonful of cayenne.
     Drain them, and let cold water run over them through a colander; when washed and drained, put them in a saucepan with a little salt, and a large blade of mace; let them stand on a cool part of the range for fifteen minutes, stirring with a wooden spoon; then add the butter and flour; simmer five minutes; add the cream and cayenne. When the oysters begin to curl they are cooked.

Oyster Toast.— Make some good buttered toast, cut into small squares or rounds, and pour over them some oysters stewed in equal parts of milk and cream, and highly spiced; heap the oysters on the toast; pour over the sauce, and serve.

Oyster Sausages.— A quarter of a pound of chicken or veal, chopped fine; three ounces of bread crumbs, rolled fine, and moistened with oyster juice; one ounce of beef suet, chopped; thirty oysters, chopped; half a yolk of an egg.
     Season with mace, cayenne, and black pepper, mould into long sausages, and fry. To be served with a rich, brown gravy.

Virginia Spiced Oysters.— One gallon of oysters; liquor of the oysters strained; one tablespoonfml of whole allspice; one saltspoonful of powdered mace; one tablespoonful of whole pepper; one pint and a half of best vinegar.
     Boil the liquor of the oysters quickly, and skim it thoroughly; then add the spices and vinegar, and allow it to boil again ; plunge the oysters into cold water; let them drain well, and then throw them into the hot spiced liquor; give them a quick boil, and set them away in a stone jar; add salt, if the oysters are fresh; do not cover them until cool. Before serving, add small angular pieces of lemon.

Pickled Oysters.—As many oysters as will fill a gallon measure without the liquor; wash them well in the liquor, removing all the shell; strain the liquor, and cook the oysters in it, adding salt, if necessary; let the oysters cook until the fins are well shrivelled; then take out the oysters, and let them cool on large dishes; add some mace and whole pepper to the liquor, carefully skimming off the scum; pour it into a large pan, and, when quite cold, add a pint of white wine and half a pint of strong vinegar; put the oysters in jars, and cover them with this liquor.

Oysters à la Certosa (Italian monastery).— Make four thin, light omelettes; do not fold them, but have ready a well–buttered casserole or deep dish; sprinkle the bottom with bread crumbs; upon this place an omelette, having the browned side uppermost; sprinkle again with bread crumbs, and minced fish, prepared as indicated below; then another omelette sprinkled with bread crumbs, putting a layer of minced fish, as before, and so on, until the form is filled, taking care to cover the last layer of fish with a thick layer of bread crumbs; stick small pieces of butter over it; then put in a quick oven, and let it remain until thoroughly browned; pin a clean napkin round the dish, and serve.
     To prepare the fish: Cook some oysters and clams over a slow fire, for half an hour, seasoning with a very little salt, pepper, and lemon juice; then take them from the fire; drain, roll in beaten egg and bread crumbs, and fry them in butter, with some minced onion and grated parsley. The moment they begin to brown take them from the fire, and proceed as indicated above.

Fried Oysters, Delmonico's.— Open your oysters; wrap them in a dry cloth till the surface moisture is absorbed; sprinkle with salt and pepper; dip them in the white of an egg slightly beaten, then into pulverized crackers; put equal parts of lard and butter in a frying–pan; heat boiling hot, and throw in your oysters; fry, and drain on brown paper. Serve with quarters of lemons around the dish.

Soft–shell Crabs à la Créole.—Pull off the spongy substances from the sides; take out the sand bags; wash well, wipe, dry, dip them in olive–oil, and broil quickly. Serve with lemon juice squeezed over them.

Shrimp or Crab Mayonnaise (Madame Eugène).— Boil and peel your shrimps or crabs; make a rich mayonnaise dressing, and serve over them; garnish your dish with tender lettuce leaves.

Broiled Salmon à la Créole.— Take either the tail or slices of salmon, cut crosswise; prepare them nicely, and let them soak in olive–oil, with salt, thyme, laurel leaf, eschalottes, and parsley; put the slices on the gridiron; baste them with the oil in which they have steeped; when done, remove the skin from the slices, arrange them on a dish, and serve with a white sauce with capers, or with sliced pickles.

Picnic Fish (Carolina receipt).— As soon as the fish are taken out of the water draw them through the gills and wipe the inside carefully; never scale them, or let them touch water; put in each fish a lump of butter, seasoned with salt and pepper; make a paste of mud; cover your fish thickly with it, and throw them in hot coals; when the mud cracks the fish are done; take them out of the fire; break them open; the scales come off and the bones come out, and you have it dish fit for a king.

Sole à la Parisienne.— Clean your fish; cut off the heads and tails; put them in a saucepan with chopped parsley, sliced onions, salt, and pepper; pour melted butter over them; let them cook on a quick fire, and stir, to keep them from adhering to each other. Serve them with an Italian sauce, made in the following manner:
     Put in a saucepan a chopped eschalotte, some chopped mushrooms, parsley, and a glass of white wine; let it simmer; add salt, pepper, and a spoonful of olive–oil; let it boil up, and add the quantity of bouillon you need for the sauce; cook it, and add a lump of butter, and serve, poured over the fish.

Roast Shad.— Take a fine fat shad; scale it, and draw it through the gills; make oblique incisions on the back, and let it steep in olive–oil, with parsley, thyme, eschalottes, salt, and pepper; put it on the spit, and baste it with the marinade in which it has steeped; serve it on a napkin, in a dish garnished with green parsley, and serve in a sauce–boat a sauce Génevoise.

Boiled Salmon.—Wash and wipe the fish; wrap it in a clean linen cloth, kept expressly for this purpose; baste it up securely, and put into the fish kettle; cover with cold water, in which has been melted a handful of salt; boil slowly, allowing a quarter of an hour to each pound ; when the time is up, rip open a corner of the cloth, and test the salmon with a silver or wooden fork; if it penetrate easily, it is done; if not, sew up the cloth quickly, and cook until tender, skimming the scum as it rises. When the fish is done, take it instantly from the kettle, remove the cloth, lay for an instant on a clean cloth, until it has drained, transfer carefully to a very hot dish, and pour over it a sauce, which must be made in the following manner, while the salmon cooks:      One pint of rich, fresh cream ; one half gill of the water in which the salmon has cooked; a large spoonful of butter; a pinch of salt; a little roasted powdered parsley. Cook à bain–marie, stirring constantly; let it boil up once, and when the salmon is dished pour over the sauce, reserveing a little in a sauce–boat; garnish the salmon with curled lettuce and slices of hard–boiled eggs.

Baked Salmon.— Wash, and wipe dry, and rub with pepper and salt, and a soupçon of cayenne; lay the fish on a buttered grating set over your baking–pan, and bake; basting freely, at first with butter, and lastly with its own drippings; should it brown too fast, cover the top with a sheet of white paper; when done, place on a hot dish, and cover closely, and add to the gravy in the dripping–pan a glassful of sherry, a spoonful of tomato sauce, the juice of a lemon, and a little hot water thickened with browned flour. Serve in a sauce–boat. Hot mayonnaise is also excellent with baked salmon.

Salmon Steaks.— Wipe, and dry well with a cloth; dredge with flour, and cook on a well–buttered gridiron, over a clear, hot fire; turn carefully; when cooked, lay on a hot dish; butter each steak, season with salt and pepper, and serve.

Pickled Salmon.— Make a pickle of two quarts of the best vinegar; twelve blades of mace; twelve white peppers; one or two minced shallots; twelve cloves; two teaspoonfuls of made mustard; some small red–pepper pods; three teaspoonfuls of white sugar; three celery seeds; one pint of the water in which the salmon has boiled.
     Mix, put in an earthenware jar, cover, and set away. The salmon must previously have been cleaned, and cut into pieces an inch and a half long and half an inch wide, and boiled in salted water; when well boiled it should be drained, dried with a cloth, and set aside until the next day; then put on the pickle over a brisk fire, and when it boils drop in the salmon very carefully; let the pickle boil up once again; then set back the kettle on the range, fish out the salmon, and pack quickly and closely into glass jars; fill with the boiling pickle until it overflows, screw down the top, and set in a cool, dark place. Salmon so prepared will keep for years.

Roast Sturgeon à la Créole.— Take a medium–sized stargeon or slices of any large fish; lard it well with spiced lard; let it steep in white wine, with salt, pepper, and spices; roast it on the spit, basting with the marinade in which it has steeped, and serve with a sauce piquante.

Salmon à la Créole.— Young salmon are eaten, cooked au courtbouillon with red wine, fried, or, better still, cooked in a little consommé with a little champagne, to which you add some slices of lean cooked ham, a soup bunch, chopped tschalottes, salt, and pepper.

Roast Salmon à la Créole.— Clean and scale your fish; lard it and cover with slices of bacon; roast it on a spit; When it is done serve it on a purée of sorrel, or a purée of finely chopped ham and mushrooms.

Smoked Salmon à la Créole.— Slice your salmon, fry it in oil, drain well on brown paper; squeeze lemon juice over it, and serve without any other preparation.

Boiled Salmon–Trout.— Clean, wash, and dry the trout; envelop in a thin cloth fitted neatly to the fish; lay within the fish–kettle, cover with cold salted water, and boil gently half an hour or longer, according to the size; when done, unwrap and lay in a hot dish; pour cream sauce round it, and serve.

Cream Pickerel.— Reserve the large pickerel —those over three pounds in weight—for baking, and bake exactly as you bake salmon–trout.

Trout Broiled in Paper.— Envelop small trout, or any other pan fish, in strong white letter paper, well buttered; pin up securely, and lay on a buttered gridiron over a clear fire, turning often and dexterously.

Rockfish and River Bass.— Prepare and cook like fresh cod; allowing, however, a shorter time for boiling.

Baked Salmon–Trout.— Clean, wash, and wipe carefully, and lay in the baking–pan with just enough water to keep it from scorching; if large, score the backbone with a sharp knife; bake slowly, basting often with butter and water. By the time it is cooked, have ready a cupful of cream diluted with a few spoonfuls of hot water, into which has been stirred two tablespoonfuls of melted butter and a little chopped parsley; heat this à bain–marie, add the gravy in the dripping–pan, boil up once to thicken, and, when the trout has been laid in a very hot dish, pour the sauce round it; garnish with curled lettuce.

To Cook Salmon.— Salmon should, if boiled, be boiled in a regular fish–kettle and in salted water.
     Or, it may be cut into steaks, and broiled on a buttered gridiron, over a clear fire.
     Or, baked, following the receipt for baked shad, or for baked salmon–trout.

Crabbed Rockfish.— Pick cold boiled rockfish into small pieces; put it in a stewpan with a gill of water; add salt, a large spoonful of white pepper, vinegar, a lump of butter, and a little cayenne pepper; shake over the fire until very hot.

Barbecued Fish.— Clean the fish thoroughly, wipe it dry, and cut it across, as if for frying; salt it inside and outside, and lay it in a baking–dish; strew over it a seasoning made of bread crumbs, parsley, sweet–marjoram, thyme, salt, pepper, and a few cloves; add two or three tablespoonfuls of water, and lay on top a large lump of butter; bake it well, and just before serving add a teacupful of port wine.

Stewed Black Fish or Sea Bass.— Clean and scale the fish; fry them whole, and then remove to a stewpan ; next pour some water into the frying–pan in which you have fried the fish, and thicken it with 'a little flour, mixed in cold water. When sufficiently cooked, throw this gravy over the fish and let it stew; season it with cloves, mace, pepper, and salt, and a little green parsley, chopped fine; about twenty minutes before serving it add a gill of catsup, a little stewed tomato, and a gill of port wine.

Broiled Shad.— Prepare as above, and broil on a buttered gridiron over a clear fire; rub well with butter when done, dust with pepper and salt, and serve.

Baked Shad.— Prepare as above; make a rich bread stuffing, mixing it with egg, beaten light, pepper, salt, and a little mace; stuff the shad, sew it up, put in a quick oven, and bake it; serve with mushroom sauce.

Boiled Shad.— When cleaned place the roe inside of it, and tie the fish firmly with several twists of cord; roll it in a cloth, put in the fish–kettle, and boil twenty minutes; serve with egg sauce.

Sheepshead— Is best boiled, and served with sauce Holandaise. Cold boiled sheepshead, flaked and served with a mayonnaise dressing, is excellent.

Shad Planked.— This is the best way of cooking fresh shad. It must be beheaded, well scaled and cleaned, cut entirely open, and laid with the outside next the plank. The plank must then be put (propped up) in front of the fire, and the shad broiled until thoroughly cooked through. Meanwhile the roe must be fried in a frying–pan. When the shad is removed from the plank rub some butter over it, and add a little salt and red pepper; serve on a hot dish without delay. Heavy slabs of oak, with cross fastenings of wire, may be bought in all the large cities, for planking shad.

Potted Shad.— Clean the fish well, reserving the roes to pot with the shad; remove the heads and tails and split the fish in two; cut each half of the fish crosswise into three pieces; rub each piece with salt and pepper; lay the fish in a layer in the bottom of a jar; scatter over it onions and a few cloves and allspice; then add another layer of fish with onions and spice, as before, and so on until the jar is full; pour strong vinegar on the fish until they are covered; cover the mouth of each jar with a piece of muslin and tie it; then spread on the muslin a thick dough made of flour and water, pressing it in at the edges to keep in the steam; set the jar in the oven after the bread has been drawn, and let it remain five or six hours, or until the oven is cold. In cities this is best done at a baker's. The jars must be stone, as earthenware would be dangerous to use with vinegar. When cold take off the dough and cloth, and cover them with a plate. They are fit to eat as soon as cold.

Soused Rockfish or Salmon.— Use the water in which the fish was boiled, regulating the quantity by that of the fish; put the water on the fire with salt, white pepper, allspice, a few cloves, and a blade or two of mace; let it boil until the flavor of the spices is extracted; when done add as much vinegar as there is liquor; let the spices remain in it; cut the fish into pieces, put them in a stone jar, and pour the liquor over hot. This is a good way of treating fish. Soused fish will keep some days in cool weather.

Fricasseed Haddock.— Remove the bones, and cut the fish into small pieces; put them in a saucepan with the skin side up and without any water; sprinkle ground mace and salt and pepper on each layer; cover it, and cook for twenty minutes: then add a quarter of a pound of butter, rolled in flour, and one cupful of sherry wine; let it remain fifteen minutes longer on the fire.

Haddock and Oysters.— Cut the fish in pieces, and put them into a saucepan with mace, pepper, and salt on each layer; cover them with water, and stew gently for fifteen minutes; then add a quarter of a pound of butter, and thicken with flour; add to this one quart of oysters, without the liquor, and, as soon as the oysters are cooked, half a cupful of sherry wine, and serve.

Corned Shad.— Clean the fish and prepare it for cooking; sprinkle well with salt, and set it away in a cold place. In the morning broil it, serving it with a little butter and red pepper. The roe must be fried. In a cool place a corned shad may be kept for two or three days.
     Salt shad must be soaked all night before being cooked.

Pickled Shad.— Clean the fish and split them in two, and wash–them in several waters until quite free from blood; rinse them in strong salt and water, and place them in a stone jar in layers, adding salt and saltpetre to each layer; fill the jar to three or four inches from the top, and be sure to have the fish quite covered with brine, putting a weight on them to keep them under it.

Boiled Shrimps à la Créole.— Wash the shrimps carefully, and boil them in salt and water, to which you add several pods of ripe red pepper; serve for breakfast; heap the shrimps in the dish and serve, surrounded by crimped parsley. This is a famous New Orleans dish.

Shrimps au Gratin à la Créole.— Boil your shrimps in salt and water, and peel them; put a layer of butter, chopped parsley, salt, and pepper in a deep dish; then a layer of shrimps; cover with powdered bread crumbs, bake, and serve.

Pickled Shrimps à la Créole.— Boil and peel your shrimps and put them in a bottle; pour over them the best vinegar and spices. In twenty–four hours they are ready for use.

Stephanie's Fish à la Créole.— Scale and clean your fish; draw it through the gills; put it in a fish–boiler; cover it well with water; add a glassful of vinegar, salt, and pepper, clove, laurel leaf, onions and carrots sliced, thyme, and parsley; let it boil until the fish is done; remove the fishboiler to the back of the stove, and leave your fish in the courtbonillon till you are ready to serve it. If you prefer you can substitute wine for vinegar, using half wine and half water. Fish au courtbouillon should be served very hot, in a folded napkin, on a dish surrounded by bunches of parsley, with a highly seasoned sauce.

Shrimps Stewed in Tomatoes.— Boil your shrimps in salt and water; peel and take off the heads; slice some onions in a saucepan, with a little lard; add sliced tomatoes, a little flour to thicken it; season with salt and cayenne pepper; put your shrimps in this sauce; cook a few moments and serve.

Fried Trout.— Clean, wash, and dry the fish; roll lightly in flour, and fry in butter or clarified dripping; let the fat be very hot, fry quickly to a delicate brown, and take up the instant they are done; drain for a moment on a folded napkin, then arrange in a very hot dish and serve.

Fried Pickerel.— Proceed as above.

Fried Smelts or other Pan Fish.— Clean, wash, and dry the fish; lay in a large dish, salt, and dredge with flour; have ready a frying–pan of hot dripping, lard, or butter; put in as many fish as the pan will hold without crowding, and fry to a light brown; drain, and serve on a hot dish, garnished with fried parsley.

Terrapins to Keep.— A supply of terrapins may be obtained in the autumn, and kept all winter, in a barrel or cask, in a cellar where they are not likely to freeze. They need not be fed, although they will be fatter, and consequently better, if you throw the kitchen waste into the barrel. As they become torpid in winter, examine them carefully from time to time to see if they are alive. Before cooking them, put them into very strong salt and water for twenty–four hours.

Maryland Receipt for Cooking Terrapins.— Plunge the terrapins alive into boiling water, and let them remain until the sides and lower shell begin to crack–this will take less than an hour; then remove them and let them get cold; take off the shell and outer skin, being careful to save all the blood possible in opening them. If there are eggs in them put them aside in a dish; take all the inside out, and be very careful not to break the gall, which must be immediately removed, or it will make the rest bitter. It lies within the liver. Then cut up the liver and all the rest of the terrapin into small pieces, adding the blood and juice that have flowed out in cutting up; add half a pint of water; sprinkle a little flour over them as you place them in the stewpan; let them stew slowly ten minutes, adding salt, black and cayenne pepper, and a very small blade of mace; then add a gill of the best brandy and half a pint of the best sherry wine; let it simmer over a slow fire very gently. About ten minutes or so, before you are ready to dish them, add half a pint of rich cream, and half a pound of sweet butter, with flour, to prevent oiling; two or three minutes before taking them off the fire, peel the eggs carefully and throw them in whole. If there should be no eggs use the yolk of hen's eggs, hard boiled. This receipt is for four terrapins.

Philadelphia Receipt for Cooking Terrapins.— Plunge the terrapins alive into boiling water; when dead take off the outside skin from the shells, and the nails from the claws; wash them in warm water, and boil them until they are quite tender and soft; throw a handful of salt in the water; when they are ready to be taken out take off the shells and pick them carefully, removing the sand–bag and gall without breaking them ; cut the meat and entrails into small pieces; place them in a porcelain–lined saucepan, adding the juice which has flowed in cutting them, but no water; season them with salt, cayenne and black pepper. To each terrapin allow a quarter of a pound of butter, mixed well with a handful of flour for thickening; after stewing for a short time add four or five tablespoonfuls of cream, and half a pint of good Madeira wine to four terrapins. The yolks of two boiled eggs and one raw one may be added before serving.

Stewed Terrapins, Eastern Shore.— Boil your terrapins until the shells become loose; then take them off, carefully saving the liquor; scrape the black skin off the meat, remove the gall, clean and chop up the entrails carefully, put them in a saucepan with the meat and liquor, pour in enough olive–oil to fry them well, season with salt and pepper (black and cayenne), and add the yolks of the turtle eggs; when well warmed through, and just before serving, pour in a teacupful of sherry or Madeira, and serve hot.

Spanish Sauce for Fried Fish.— Pound a clove of garlic and two red–pepper pods which you have softened in hot water; thin it with a little water, pour it in a saucepan with some hot olive–oil, vinegar, and salt; fry your fish in this sauce.

A Substitute for Terrapin's Eggs.— Beat the yolks of three hard–boiled eggs in a mortar, and make them into a paste with one raw yolk; roll into balls, and throw them into boiling water to harden. These are excellent if the terrapin eggs are deficient.

A Delaware Receipt for Cooking Terrapins.— One dozen of medium–sized terrapins; three quarters of a pound of butter; one tablespoonful of flour; one tablespoonful of mustard; one teaspoonful of salt; half a pint of good wine; yolks of six hard–boiled eggs; one teaspoonful of the best brandy; one saltspoonful of cayenne.
     Plunge the terrapins alive into boiling water; at the end of half an hour begin to examine them; some will take half an hour, some an hour and a quarter, to boil tender. While hot remove the skin, nails, head, gall–bladder, and sand–bags; open each terrapin carefully over a bowl to save the gravy; chop the terrapins fine, and put one half of the livers with the meat into a deep bowl; cover it with wine and let it stand two or three hours; rub the other half of the livers, the six eggs, and the butter well together until smooth; add the flour, mustard, and cayenne. The meat steeped in wine should be first put into the stewpan, the dressing added, and be stirred constantly. They should only come to a boil to scald the flour, and be served at once very hot; they should not be left for a moment. The quantities required of mustard and cayenne entirely depend on the strength of the material furnished, and the cook should be discreet in the use of them. The quantity of salt varies with the quantity of meat turned out from the terrapin.
     Those who prefer the smaller ones get a large one for the eggs, as they are considered a delicacy; but no epicure would ever prefer the larger meat. The larger terrapins may be boned, and the meat very carefully stewed up.
     There is a red–legged terrapin in the market, the eggs of which are very delicate, and by many considered superior to the eggs of the diamond back.
     For an invalid, terrapins stewed in cream, with salt and pepper, are very nourishing.

Fried Fillets of Whitings with Truffles.— Cut fillets of whitings the same size, fry them in butter, sprinkle with fine salt, drain on brown paper, squeeze lemon juice over them, slice some truffles in the frying–pan, add a little butter, and dress them in alternate slices on a dish garnished with fried croutons of bread.

Broiled Whitings.— Prepare your fish; sprinkle with salt and pepper; steep them in olive–oil; when you are ready to serve them place them on the griddle; let them cook slowly, turning them; when done pour over them either a white sauce with capers or capucines, or a tomato sauce; garnish the dish with slices of lemon or pickles cut in slices.

Sole à la Normandie.— Put a lump of fresh butter as large as an egg in a dish you can place on the fire; add slices of onions cut very thin, parsley, salt, and pepper; lay your fish in this; pour over half a bottle of the best cider, two dozen oysters, one dozen muscles well trimmed, shrimps, and slices of truffles; cook on a gentle fire, basting the fish from time to time with the sauce; when it is cooked place the fish on a dish, and pour over the sauce.

Fish Cooked with Macaroni.— Throw your macaroni in boiling water; when it swells and is nearly done take it out, and throw it in cold water and drain well; cook your fish in the same water, take it off the fire, scale it, and cut it in slices; remove all the bones; put some butter and grated cheese in a deep dish, then put in a layer of fish, then one of cheese and macaroni, and continue till you place four alternate layers; put it in the stove till it cooks; brown it with a salamander.

Fried Whitings (Greenwich Receipt).— Scale, wash, and draw your fish, leaving in the livers; cut off the fins and tails; make oblique incisions on both sides of the fish; sprinkle with flour and throw them in boiling lard; when they are a good color take them out, drain them on brown paper, sprinkle them with a little fine salt, and serve on a napkin; garnish your dish with fried parsley.

Stewed Rockfish.— Rub the fish well with butter to keep the skin from breaking; brown three or four onions in slices and spread them on the bottom of the fish–kettle; place the fish upon the onions, with pepper and salt; pour over it about three pints of water, and let it simmer very slowly; just before serving add a wineglassful of wine, and the same of mushroom catsup.

Désirie's Couribouillon for Fish.— Three green onions sliced and fried with three cloves of garlic; half a bottle of claret; one tablespoonful of the finest white flour; half a bottle of beef tea; five whole tomatoes; some fresh fish, cut in slices.
     When the onions and garlic are done put in the other ingredients, the fish and tomatoes last of all; season it to taste, and let it simmer until done.

Salt Fish and Potatoes.— One pound of salt fish ; three and a half pounds of potatoes, peeled; one and a half ounces of dripping; one onion, chopped fine; one bunch of parsley; white pepper, salt, mustard, and vinegar to taste.
     Chop it fine, and put it in the saucepan with a little fresh water; let it come to a boil as slowly as possible; boil and mash the potatoes, and put a layer of potatoes in the bottom of a dish, with a little dripping; put in the fish and a layer of chopped parsley and onion; add mustard, pepper, and vinegar, then another layer of potatoes, then another of fish, etc., until the dish is full; cover all with potatoes and a little dripping; bake in a quiet oven for half an hour.

Fish au Gratin.— Take a long, flat dish which you can put on the fire; put a layer of onions cut in round slices in the bottom, and another layer of sliced tomatoes; enough olive–oil to prevent burning; season well with salt and pepper (red is preferable); clean and scale your fish, stuff it with a stuffing made of sausage–meat (without sage or spices), chopped oysters, chopped mushrooms, the yolk of an egg, bread crumbs, pepper, and salt well mixed together; lay your fish in the baking–dish, put a large lump of butter on it, and put it in the oven; moisten it from time to time with the sauce; when nearly done pour over a generous supply of white wine, and sprinkle with bread crumbs; pour a little of the sauce over the bread crumbs before serving; garnish your dish with sprigs of parsley and lemon cut in quarters.

Mackerel or Pompano should be boiled and served with maitre d'hôtel sauce, which is made by mixing chopped parsley, salt, and pepper with butter, and adding the juice of a lemon.

Oyster Toast.— Beard the oysters; chop them up with anchovies (removing the bones); pepper and a little salt, mix with butter; fry them five minutes; spread the paste on slices of toasted bread; pour over the juice which is left; serve hot, for breakfast or lunch.

Boston Codfish Balls ("Boston Cook–book").— One cup of raw salt fish; one pint of potatoes; one teaspoonful of butter; one egg, well beaten; one quarter of a saltspoonful of pepper; salt, if needed.
     Wash and bone the fish, and pick in half–inch pieces; pare the potatoes, and cut in quarters; put potatoes and fish in the stewpan, and boil twenty–five minutes, or until the potatoes are soft, but be careful not to let them boil long enough to become soggy; drain off all the water, mash and beat the fish and potatoes until very light, add the butter and pepper, and when slightly cooled add the egg, and more salt if necessary; shape quickly into cakes, slip off into a basket, and fry in smoking hot lard one minute; fry only five at a time, as more will cool the fat; the lard should be hot enough to brown a piece of bread while you count forty; drain on soft paper. These balls should be mixed while the potatoes and fish are hot. If you wish to prepare them the night before, omit the egg, and in the morning warm the fish and potatoes in a double boiler, and then add the egg; keep the fish in a bowl of cold water while picking it apart, and it will need no further soaking.
     Never chop salt fish; pick apart into small pieces, and rub with a potato masher until it is reduced to fine threads.

Boston Fish Hash ("Boston Cook–book").— Prepare as above, cook in a little salt–pork fat in a frying–pan until brown, and then turn out like an omelet.

Boston Fish Soufflé.— Prepare as above, add two tablespoonfuls of cream and two eggs, cream and eggs well beaten, and beaten separately; bake in a buttered dish.


MEAT.

BEEF.
BOASTING MEATS (soyer).

As an invariable rule, all dark meats—such as beef and mutton—should be put down before a sharp fire for at least fifteen minutes, until the outside has a coating of gravy; then remove it back, and cook it gently. Lamb, veal, and pork should be cooked at a moderate tire. Veal should be covered with paper. Very rich meat, if covered with paper, does not require blasting. Roast meats should be dredged with flour just at the time the gravy begins to appear.

TIME–TABLE FOR BOASTING.

Ten pounds of beef require from two hours to two and a half roasting before a good fire, but at eighteen inches distant. Six pounds one hour and a quarter to one hour and a half, fourteen inches from a good fire.
     Three ribs of beef, boned and rolled, well tied round with paper, will take two hours and a half, eighteen inches from a good fire, and only baste once.
     If beef is very fat it does not require basting; if very lean, tie it up in greasy paper and baste well.
     Eight pounds of veal will take from one hour and a half to two hours, eighteen inches from the fire; if stuffed, at least two hours.
     Chump, or loin and kidneys, of four pounds, will take one hour and a quarter; baste well.
     Six pounds of breast one hour, twelve inches from the fire.
     Six pounds of shoulder and neck the same.
     Calf's heart, stuffed and tied up in paper, three quarters of an hour.
     Mutton leg, eight pounds, one hour and a half, eighteen inches from the fire.
     Saddle of mutton, ten pounds, one hour and a quarter to one hour and a half, eighteen inches from the fire, measuring from the flat surface.
     Shoulder, one hour and a half. Loin, one hour and a half. Breast, three quarters of an hour.
     Lamb, according to size, in the same proportion as mutton; but it ought always to be well done, and should roast at about fifteen inches from the fire.
     Pork should be well done always. It is best to rub it well with salt the night previous, and scrape it off before roasting.
     In roasting beef, mutton, lamb, pork, and poultry, a dripping–pan should be placed under the meat, with a little clear dripping or fat, which should be very hot when the meat is basted. A quarter of an hour before serving add half a pint of water to the fat in the dripping–pan; dredge the meat with flour and salt. When the meat is cooked, strain the gravy in the dripping–pan through a gauze strainer, remove the fat, add a little coloring, and serve.
     Veal and poultry should have half the water put into the pan, and that, when strained, added to half a pint of thick, melted butter; color as above directed.

Roast Beef on the Spit.—The best pieces for roasting are the sirloin and rib pieces. It is best to make the butcher remove as much bone as possible. Skewer the meat into shape and pass it on the spit; place a drippingpan underneath, and baste the beef at first with butter, afterwards with its own drippings. The fire should be clear, steady, and not too fierce; allow a quarter of an hour to a pound if you like the beef rare; serve on a heated dish, pouring over it the liquor in the dripping–pan, and garnish with a wreath of water–cresses or fresh parsley. Roast beef should always be accompanied by mustard and scraped horseradish. There are three different ways of preparing this. It may be served dry, or steeped in vinegar, or steeped in cream. The latter is most in use in Italy, and is very good.

Baked Beef (or beef roasted in the oven).—Put the beef to roast in a deep pan, and before putting it down dash a cup of boiling water over it to prevent the escape of the juices. If very fat, cover with a paste of flour and water until nearly done; baste frequently—at first with salt and water, afterwards with its own drippings; when almost done dredge with a little browned flour, and baste once with butter; allow a quarter of an hour to a pound for rare beef, more if you like the beef well done; serve on a very hot dish, and garnish as above.

Yorkshire Pudding, No. 1.—One pint of milk; four eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately; two cups of flour; one teaspoonful of salt.
     This pudding should be mixed three quarters of an hour before the beef is done, and poured into the dripping–pan, which should contain just fat enough to prevent the pudding from sticking; it should cook under the meat; when both are cooked the pudding should be cut into squares, and placed in the same dish with the beef.

Yorkshire Pudding, No. 2.—Four tablespoonfuls of Hecker's farina; one pint of milk; four eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately.
     Mix and pour into the dripping–pan as above. This is much better than the ordinary Yorkshire pudding.

Yorkshire Pudding, No. 3.—Four tablespoonfuls of Hecker's farina; one pint of milk.
     Boil and allow to cool; when cold and hard put into a dish under the beef; do this just long enough to allow it to get thoroughly browned and heated through. This is the simplest and best of all.

Stewed Beefsteak.—Fry a tender steak lightly, with onions, turnips, and carrots; then stew slowly, as for rump of beef.

Stewed Rump of Beef—Wash it well, and season high with salt, allspice, black and cayenne pepper, three cloves, and a blade of mace, all in fine powder; bind tightly, and lay in a pot that will just hold it, with three large onions sliced and fried, three carrots, two turnips, a shallot, four cloves, a blade of mace, and some celery; add, also, a handful of sweet herbs, regulating the quantity of each according to their pungency. The herbs used should be parsley, thyme, basil, knotted marjoram, and chives. Cover the beef with good beef broth, putting in some bones if you have them; simmer as slowly and gently as possible for several hours, until quite tender; clear off the fat, add to the gravy half a pint of port wine, a glass of vinegar, a tablespoonful of mushroom catsup, a pinch of burned sugar; now simmer for half an hour longer, and serve in a deep dish; garnish with tiny heaps of different vegetables, herbs, mushrooms, beet root, pickles, etc.; all cut small and arranged in a tasteful manner; pour the gravy over the beef and serve.

Beef Collops.—Take some beef that is tender and free from skin, cut into small, thin pieces, and hack it with a knife; then butter a stewpan, and put in as much beef as will cover the pan, with a soupcon of onion, some cucumber cut small, and salt and pepper; put it over the fire and toss constantly; two or three minutes will do them; add a little browned flour, butter, and water to the gravy.

Beef Robart.—Take the inside of a sirloin of beef; cut it very thin, and fry a moment in butter; stew with good stock, chopped shallot, anchovy essence, mushrooms, and oysters; thicken the gravy as above.

Old Humphrey's à la mode Beef (in use for nearly two centuries in the same family).—A fine round of beef, weighing ten or fifteen pounds; prepare the day before cooking as follows: Make a rich stuffing of rolled bread crumbs, salt pork chopped fine, two large onions peeled and chopped, some ground cloves, half a dessertspoonful of allspice, some salt and pepper, some sweet marjoram and other herbs, chopped fine; mix all thoroughly with the hand; then make perpendicular incisions with a sharp knife through the meat. These incisions should be an inch wide, and should be filled with the stuffing and strips of lean pork half an inch square. Then tie round the edges of the beef with a strong cord; tie as tightly as possible so as to leave the beef a perfect round; cover the top of the round with the stuffing, which should lie an inch thick on the top; cover the beef with a large porcelain dish cover, and leave it thus all night. In the morning put the beef into a baking–kettle, or, if you have not a baking–kettle, into a large pot with legs, and put it on the stove or range; after you have laid four pieces of hard wood like this ≠ to keep the meat from burning, add one pint — not more — of water, and then put on your meat; cook it over a slow fire, adding more water as it becomes absorbed. The beef should cook six or eight hours at least (ten or twelve hours is not too much for a piece of beef weighing over fifteen pounds). After the beef has cooked three hours, put in three large potatoes sliced, and as many turnips and carrots, also sliced; two hours before serving throw in a tumblerful of currant jelly, which, added to the gravy already in the pot, will make a delicious gravy; when the beef is cooked, remove it to a hot dish, take off the cord, and arrange the vegetables round it; strain the liquor left in the pot, add some browned flour, boil up once, and pour over and round the à la mode; garnish with slices of lemon and watercress. This beef is also delicious cold.

Spiced Beef.—Twenty to twenty–five pounds of round of beef; half a pound of coarse brown sugar; two ounces of saltpetre; three quarters of a pound of common salt; a quarter of a pound of black pepper; three ounces of allspice; four ounces of bruised juniper berries.
     Rub the beef well, in every part, with the coarse brown sugar and let it remain two days; then reduce to powder all the other ingredients, and blend them thoroughly and smoothly together; when this is done rub the ingredients strongly and equally over the meat, turning it at the same time so as not to permit even the tenth part of an inch to miss the rubbing. Repeat this daily for three weeks, always turning, of course; then wash off the spice, and put the beef into an earthen pan as nearly of its size as possible; pour into the pan a cupful of good strong stock; cover the beef thickly with chopped beef suet, and lay a coarse, thick crust over the pan; then put on the cover and bake the meat from five to six hours in a moderate oven, which should not, however, be sufficiently fierce to harden the meat. If properly managed spiced beef is exceedingly tender; it should be allowed to cool in the pan in which it was baked; when quite cold, remove it from the pan and scrape off the suet; garnish it with crimped parsley and water–cresses. It is to be served cold.

Hunter's Beef, Gloucestershire.—Twenty–five pounds of a fine, fat round of beef; take out the bone and rub the beef daily for two weeks with the following mixture: Three ounces of saltpetre; one ounce of ground cloves; half an ounce of allspice; one large nutmeg, grated; one quart of salt; two ounces of brown sugar.
     Mix all the ingredients thoroughly and smoothly together and pound them to a fine powder; place a layer of this powder in the bottom of the tub in which you put the beef, and after the beef has been well rubbed cover it with the powder. Be careful to turn the beef daily when you rub it, and to rub it hard and evenly. At the end of two weeks wash the beef carefully in vinegar; fill the place from which the bone has been taken with fat; stick some cloves in the fat; bind the beef with tape to keep it in a compact, round shape, and lay it in a pan which fits it exactly; cover it with a thick layer of beef suet, and pour over it a pint of fresh water, in which you have mixed a wineglassful of port wine; cover the pan with a thick paper, buttered, and again with a closely fitting cover; bake five hours over a clear, steady, but not too fierce, fire; allow the beef to cool in the pan; when quite cold uncover the pan, take out the beef, unbind it, and scrape off the suet; serve cold.

Corned Beef.—Rub the beef well with salt, mixed with one tenth part of saltpetre, until the salt lies dry upon the surface; put aside in a cold place for twenty–four hours and repeat the process, rubbing in the mixture very thoroughly; put away until the next day, when the pickle should be ready: Five gallons of water; one gallon of salt; four ounces of saltpetre; one and a half pounds of brown sugar.
     Boil this pickle ten minutes; when perfectly cold, pour over the beef, having previously wiped the latter dry; examine the pickle from time to time to see if it keeps well; if not, take the meat out at once, wipe it, and cover with salt until you can prepare new and stronger brine.

Russian Beef Balls.—For these balls equal quantities of the best rump steak and fillet are required. The meat must be entirely freed from skin and fat, and chopped so finely that it can be passed through a sieve; all the blood must be preserved and mixed with the minced meat, which must be very slightly salted. Meanwhile cut another fillet into thick strips, and squeeze the juice into a saucepan; form the mince into balls, binding it, if necessary, with beaten egg, but leaving a hollow in the centre of each ball; the saucepan with the beef juice must then be put for a moment or two on the fire, until the juice thickens, when the saucepan should be removed from the fire, and the juice poured into the balls, i.e., in the hollow in the middle; then close and reform the balls, dip them in beaten white of egg, and in bread crumbs; fry them rapidly in beef lard (the whole process must be brief) until they are of a delicate brown color; then drain in a wire basket, and serve in a very hot dish. If properly made and cooked they are rare inside, and have the flavor of the best roast beef. Plain boiled potatoes, light and floury, should be served with them.

Stewed Fillet of Beef with Raisins.—Take four pounds of fillet, wipe clean, and put into a porcelain-lined casserole with two ounces of good butter, and a sufficient quantity of finely chopped celery, carrots, onions, and ham to form a layer over and under the beef. This mince should previously have been fried in butter to a light brown. Cover the casserole closely, and stew over a slow fire for three quarters of an hour; then remove from the fire for a moment, and strain the mince; return the fillet and strained sauce to the casserole, adding a teacupful of strong beef tea, or stock, and a double handful of the best Sultana raisins, seeded; cover the casserole closely, and stew for an hour and a quarter; serve on a hot dish, and pour over the fillet the sauce and raisins with which it has been cooked. This quantity of fillet is enough for six people.

Stewed Fillet of Beef with Mushrooms.—Take six pounds of fillet of beef, wipe clean, and put into a porcelain–lined saucepan with a mince prepared in the following manner: Take equal quantities of dried mushrooms, fresh shallots, celery, and uncooked ham; chop very fine, and fry to a light brown in butter; put a thick layer of this" mince under and over the fillet, add two and a half ounces of butter, and stew over a slow fire for an hour; then strain the mince, return the fillet and sauce to the fire, adding a large teacupful of strong beef tea or stock, a wineglassful of sherry, and a double handful of button mushrooms, properly washed, wiped, and scraped; cover the casserole closely, and stew for an hour and a quarter longer; serve on a hot dish, and pour over it the sauce and mushrooms with which it has been cooked.

Beefsteak Broiled.—Cut the steak three quarters of an inch thick, wipe carefully with a clean cloth, lay on the meat board, and pound with a steak mallet; wipe again carefully, and lay on a buttered gridiron over a clear fire, turning it very often when it begins to drip, and withdrawing the gridiron from the fire a moment should the fat drop on the coals and blaze. The steak ought to cook in twelve minutes if the fire be good; then lay on a very hot dish which has previously been rubbed with garlic, salt, and pepper on both sides, and lay a liberal lump of butter on the upper; then cover, and let it stand five minutes in a hot place to draw out the juices; dust lightly with roasted powdered parsley before sending it to table.
     If the proper sort of gridiron be not attainable, rub lightly a clean, hot frying-pan with a rag dipped in butter, put in the meat, set over a clear, fierce fire, and turn frequently. The best pieces for steak are the porter–house, sirloin, and rump. In some respects the rump steaks are the best of all.

Beefsteak and Onions.—Prepare the steak as above directed; while broiling, put three or four chopped onions in the frying–pan with a little beef dripping or butter; stir them quickly until they are delicately browned; when the steak is dished cover it with the onions, then cover the dish and let it stand eight minutes.

Beefsteak Pie.—Cut the steak into pieces an inch long, and stew, with the bone, in enough water to cover it until the meat is half done; in another pot parboil twelve good potatoes. Take a deep pudding dish, and put in a layer of the beef with salt, pepper, and a little chopped onion, then one of sliced potatoes, with little bits of butter dotted over them; proceed in this manner until the dish is full; pour over all the gravy in which the meat has stewed, having first thrown away the bone and thickened with browned flour; cover with a thick crust, leaving a slit in the middle; brush with beaten white of egg and bake.

Crust for Meat Pies.—One quart of fine white flour, sifted; three tablespoonfuls of lard; two and a half cups of milk; one teaspoonful of soda wet with hot water, and stirred into the milk; two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, sifted into the dry flour; one teaspoonful of salt.
     Work up very lightly and quickly, and do not let it get too stiff.

Beef Pie, Potato Crust.—Mince some cold roast or corned beef, season, and spread a layer in the bottom of a deep pudding dish; then a layer of mashed potato stuck over with bits of butter, then meat again, and so on until the dish is full; pour over all a gravy made of dripping, milk, butter, and a little tomato catsup, and cover all with a thick crust made as follows: One large cupful of mashed potato; two tablespoonf uls of melted butter; a well–beaten egg; two cups of milk.
     Beat all together until very light, and add enough flour to enable you to roll it out; cover the pudding dish with this crust, cutting a slit in the middle; brush over with beaten white of egg and bake.

Beef Hash.—Two parts of cold roast beef, freed from fat and chopped fine; one part of cold potatoes, chopped fine; a little pepper, salt, milk, and melted butter.
     Turn into a frying–pan and stir until it is heated through, but not brown; put into a deep dish and form into a hillock.
     Or, cease stirring for a few minutes, and let a brown crust form; then serve in a round dish, with the crust uppermost.
     The hash may also be served on small squares of toast.

Corned Beef Hash is made in precisely the same way, never allowing, however, a crust to form; serve with poached eggs on top.

Rolled Beef.— Take some lean, raw beef, free from fat and skin, and pound in a mortar until you can pass it through a sieve; mix with it half the quantity of stale bread crumbs moistened with water to a paste, also some fat pork cut into small dice; season with a chopped shallot, a little grated lemon peel, the tiniest pinch of sugar, and salt and pepper to taste; bind with beaten egg and roll in bread crumbs; then envelop it in cabbage leaves, bind it with string into a firm roll, and bake. It should be eaten cold.

Irish Stew. — Put some slices of lean beef in a stewpan, with a good deal of water, or, better still, thin stock, two large onions thinly sliced, a stick of celery chopped fine, some cold boiled potatoes (whole), and a little salt and pepper; stew gently until the potatoes are quite soft and have taken up nearly all the gravyv

Tomato and Beef Stew. — Put some large trophy tomatoes — peeled, cored, and sliced thinly — into a stewpan with some raw beef, prepared in the following manner: Take some lean beef — rump steak is best — free from skin and fat, and pound it so finely that it can be passed through a sieve; spread each slice of tomato nearly an inch thick with this, salting it very slightly; then put another layer of tomatoes and beef, and so on until the stewpan is nearly full; pour in all the blood from the steak, and enough stock to moisten all; sprinkle the top layer with browned bread crumbs, also moistened slightly with stock; stick bits of fresh butter over this layer, and, covering the stewpan, let all stew together slowly until it becomes very soft; then stir thoroughly, add a tablespoonful of white sugar, and serve in a very hot dish, rubbed with garlic.

Breakfast Stew of Beef (" Common-Sense in the Household "). — Cut up two pounds of beef — not too lean — into pieces an inch long; put them into a saucepan with just enough water to cover them, and stew gently for two hours; set away until next morning, when season with pepper, salt, sweet marjoram or summer savory, chopped onion, and parsley; stew half an hour longer, and add a teaspoonful of sauce or catsup, and a tablespoonful of browned flour moistened with cold water; finally, half a glass of wine; boil up once, and pour into a covered deep dish.

Beef's Heart. — Wash the heart well, and cut into squares half an inch long; stew them for ten minutes in enough water to cover them; salt the water slightly, and skim the scum as it rises; take out the meat, strain the liquor, and return the chopped heart to it, with a sliced onion, a large spoonful of tomato catsup, some parsley, a head of celery chopped fine, and cayenne pepper, with a large lump of butter; stew until the meat is very tender, thicken with a tablespoonful of browned flour, boil up once, and serve.

Dried Smoked Beef and Eggs. — Shave the beef into thin strips, and put into a pan with enough boiling water to cover them; set them over the fire for ten minutes, then drain off the water and cut the beef into very small pieces; have ready some well-beaten eggs, allowing four to half a pound of beef; stir them into a pan with the minced meat, and toss and stir the mixture about for two minutes; send to table in a covered dish.

Grated Beef, — Cut a thick lump of smoked beef and dry it in the oven until perfectly hard; then grate to fine powder, and serve with thin slices of bread-and-butter, or with hot buttered wafers.

Beef Tongue. — Wash thoroughly, and soak over-night in cold water. The next morning put it into a pot with plenty of cold water, and boil slowly until — on testing it with a fork — you find it tender throughout; when cold pare off the thick skin, garnish with parsley, and cut in slices.

Or, you can serve it hot with a dolce forte sauce. Tongue is very good in the latter way.

Persellade of Bouilli. — Put some drippings of roast meat, or some butter, in a silver or earthen dish that you can put on the fire; chop some mushrooms and parsley very fine and put a layer in the bottom of your dish; cover this with a, layer of dried bread crumbs, and lay in your slices of bouilli; repeat this till you use all the bouilli; moisten it well with bouillon, and from time to time add more bouillon; season with salt and pepper; let it simmer three quarters of an hour, skim off the grease, and serve with a garnish of small potatoes fried in butter.

Bouilli en Quenelles. — Chop your bouilli very fine, with some roasted Irish potatoes; add some butter, salt, and pepper; bind it with some beaten eggs; knead it all well together, make it into little balls which you fry in butter, and serve with a sauce piquante.

Poor-Man's Stew. — Slice your soup meat and put it on a platter; sprinkle with salt and pepper, chopped parsley, and chives, and a clove of garlic mashed fine; add a little lard, a glass of stock, and a few bread crumbs; let it simmer on the hot ashes till done, and serve.

Rib Piece with Mushrooms. — 'Take out the bones, trim away any superfluous fat and tendons; put your entrecôte (rib piece) in a saucepan with a piece of butter as large as an egg; let it cook on both sides, and take it out; put in the same saucepan a spoonful of flour; let it brown; moisten with warm water; add a glassful of brandy, salt and pepper; put your entrecôte back in the saucepan; cook it three or four hours, add some mushrooms, and finish cooking; five minutes before serving add some olives which you have stoned.

Fricasseed Tripe. — Cut it into little squares; put some butter in a saucepan with a spoonful of flour; add a glassful of bouillon; cook your tripe in this ten minutes; stir in (taking the saucepan off the fire) the yolks of two eggs, a little butter, salt, and pepper, and a little lemon juice.

Fried Tripe. — Cut the tripe in strips two inches long; dip them in melted butter seasoned with salt and pepper, then into pounded bread crumbs, fry them a golden brown, and arrange them in a crown on a dish with sauce Tartar, or sauce Robert.

Bouilli. — This is soup meat. Yon take it out of your soup-pot and serve as an entrée. You can serve it with any sauce. Tomato is excellent, or sauce piquante made of chopped pickles,mustard, and oil.

Beef Tongue (Gruillaumé's receipt). — Scald a beef's tongue and take off the outer skin; boil the tongue in salted water till done; drain well, and when thoroughly cold cut it in slices, dress it on a dish, and cover with a mayonnaise sauce. This, when well dressed, cannot be distinguished from fish.

Beef Tongue, Sauce Piquante. — Scald a beef's tongue, and take off the outer skin; boil the tongue in salted water; split it lengthwise, and pour over it a sauce piquante.

Tongue Smothered in Mushrooms. — Blanch your tongue in boiling water, skin it, and trim it; lard it with strips of bacon; put in it saucepan slices of salted fat pork with the skin on it, pepper, parsley, thyme, a laurel leaf, a clove, onions, and carrots; place your tongue on this, add a glassful of white wine, or half a glassful of brandy, and cover your tongue well with bouillon; cook slowly three hours; cover your saucepan with a buttered paper and keep the saucepan lid on all the time, to prevent evaporation; take your tongue out of the saucepan, put it on a dish, and slice it lengthwise, without cutting the slices apart; skim your sauce, thicken it with a little roux, and add chopped eschalottes, mushrooms, chopped pickles, pepper, and a little bouillon; boil five minutes, and serve poured over the tongue. A tomato sauce may also be served with the tongue if preferred.

Slices of cold tongue dipped in egg and bread crumbs and fried can also be served with a mushroom or tomato sauce.

Beef à la Mode. — Take a round of beef, lard it well, put it in a saucepan with some slices of bacon skin, half a calf's foot, an onion, a carrot, a soup bunch, laurel leaf, thyme, garlic, cloves, salt, and pepper; pour over a pint of water, half a glassful of white wine or a spoonful of brandy, and cook until the meat becomes tender; dress your beef on a dish; skim the gravy, adding bouillon if necessary, let it boil up, strain it, and pour over the beef. It requires six hours to cook over a slow fire, and the saucepan should be kept closely covered.

Tenderloin à la Broche. — Trim and lard your fillet; steep it twelve hours in a marinade of olive-oil, pepper, salt, parsley, laurel leaf, and slices of onion; put it on the spit, the larded side covered with buttered paper; let it cook before a quick fire; remove the paper a few moments before serving; take it off the spit quite rare; serve it with a sauce made of the drippings, a dash of lemon, chopped eschalottes, salt, and pepper.

Tenderloin Steaks, Sautis aux Champignons. — Cut your steaks all the same size; season with salt and pepper; broil them on a gridiron over a quick fire, turning them that they may be a good color on both sides; when done place them on a dish and keep warm; melt a piece of butter in a saucepan; add your mushrooms cut very thin, a little stock (a tablespoonful); season to taste; add a glassful of white wine; let it boil up once, skim, and serve poured over the steaks.

Turnovers. — Take slices of cold tenderloin; heat them in hot gravy or bouillon; cut slices of bread the size of the slices of tenderloin; fry them in butter, arrange them on a dish — alternately a slice of fillet and a slice of bread — and pour over them a sauce piquante.

Birds without Bones à la Bertini. — Take thin slices of tenderloin beef; spread over them thin slices of boiled ham exactly the same size; put in each one a ripe olive and a sage leaf; wrap them up and tie them tightly in little rolls; cook them in olive-oil in a saucepan; remove the threads and serve.

Stewed Beef Feet for Breakfast. — Clean your beef's feet; scrape well, and scald and remove the hoofs; boil them in water until they are tender. You can ascertain this by sticking them with a sharp knife. Drain them, and remove the large bones; put a lump of butter in a saucepan with the feet, pour in a cupful of rich, sweet cream, season with salt and pepper, cook slowly until you can run a straw through them, and serve.

Sirloin à la Godard. — Remove the bones from the sirloin, trim away the gristle, and any tendons you can reach; lard it well with salted fat pork; make it into a round; skewer it carefully to keep it in shape; put it in a saucepan with carrots, a bunch of fine herbs, onions, salt, and pepper; cover it with good bouillon, and put in it a glassful of Madeira; cook it on a slow fire; when the beef is done skim the gravy and strain it; return it to the saucepan with some meat juice, sliced sweetbreads, artichokes, and mushrooms; pour this sauce over your sirloin and serve.

The Best Way to Beat Cold Meats. — Cover them with buttered paper; put them on the spit until they warm through. They will be as tender as the first day. If the cold meats are in small pieces, cover them with buttered paper, and broil them on the gridiron; sprinkle them with finely chopped herbs.

Rib Piece à la Marseillaise. — Remove the bones from the rib piece; cook it in a saucepan with some slices of bacon; set it aside; make a roux in the saucepan; put back your rib piece and slices of bacon; add spices, salt, onions, carrots, soup bunch, and a glassful of brandy; cook it five hours over a slow fire, skim it, and serve. A great many pieces of beef, veal, mutton, and even pork, can be served in this manner.

Tripe, How to Prepare it. — Scrape your tripe; clean it carefully; wash it through several waters (boiling), then in cold water; cook six hours in water with slices of onion, cloves, salt, and a few spoonfuls of flour.

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Veal.

Roast Loin of Veal. — Allow a quarter of an hour to a pound; heat gradually, and baste frequently — at first with salt and water, afterwards with its own gravy 5 when nearly done dredge lightly with flour, and baste once with melted butter. Should the meat brown too fast, cover with white paper buttered; skim the gravy, thicken with a spoonful of browned flour, boil up once, and serve.

Veal Chops. — Trim as for mutton-chops, dip in beaten egg, and roll in bread crumb, and fry.

Veal Steak. — This should be thinner than beefsteak, and thoroughly cooked. Rare veal is an abomination. Broil on a buttered gridiron over a clear fire, turning frequently until thoroughly cooked; serve with tomato sauce poured over the steak, made as follows: A teacupful of tomato stewed and strained; five small button onions, chopped fine; a little thyme and parsley; a piece of butter the size of an egg; a pinch of sugar, and salt to taste.

Heat all in a saucepan, and thicken with a spoonful of browned flour.

Veal Sausage d la Bavière (Frau von P. zu P.). — Take a good piece of veal, extract the bone, and pound it with a mallet; put both veal and bone into a casserole, together with a calf's foot, and sprinkle both with salt and white pepper; put in, also, some chopped onions, carrots, celery, and parsley; also some sweet marjoram, thyme, grated rind of lemon, a laurel leaf, and several slices of bacon. It is better to put the vegetables, herbs, and bacon into the casserole first, and then the meat and calf's foot. When all the ingredients are in the casserole pour in a tablespoonful of vinegar, and about five ounces of melted butter; cover the casserole with buttered paper, put on the cover, and steam slowly, until the contents are a soft mass; then strain off the liquor, remove the bone and calf's foot, and put the meat into a mortar; pound and chop it, moistening from time to time with the liquor; then work it all into a fine, smooth mass, and form it into a thick sausage roll; brush it over with melted butter, and set it on a wet board, in a cool place, to harden; serve French mustard with it. This receipt is also nice for venison.

Veal and Ham Pie. — Butter a large bowl very thickly, and line with sliced and buttered hard-boiled eggs; then put in alternate layers of the thinnest possible slices of veal and ham, each completely freed from fat, peppered, and sprinkled with lemon juice; proceed in this way until the dish is packed to the brim, remembering always to pack very tightly; when full cover all with a thick paste made of flour and hot water, just stiff enough to handle with ease; let it overlap the rim by about an inch; set the bowl in a pot of hot water, taking care that the water does not come up to the paste rim; boil steadily, but not hard, for three hours; then set away in a cool place for twenty-four hours; then remove the paste, turn the pie out of the bowl, and when you serve cut in thin slices.

Minced Veal (Old Humphrey). — Take any cold roast veal; remove the skin, fat, and bones; put the bones, skin, and gristly pieces into a saucepan with a cup of cold milk, or, better still, of veal or chicken stock, a little ham, a small red-pepper pod, and a pinch of sugar, also a small bunch of sweet herbs; stew all together for an hour, then strain, thicken with flour, return to the saucepan, and boil five minutes longer, stirring in a tablespoonful of butter, and another of roasted, powdered parsley. Meanwhile mince the cold veal, and put into the gravy a little at a time; adding, also, a little grated rind of lemon; when almost at boiling-point stir in two tablespoonfuls of cream, and, last of all, a little lemon juice; heap on a hot dish, and surround with slices of lemon.

Scalloped Veal. — Butter a deep dish, and fill with alternate layers of finely minced veal and rolled bread crumbs, dotting the bread crumbs with bits of butter; season with pepper and salt, and moisten with cream or milk; last of all pour in a cupful of veal broth, and cover with a thick layer of rolled bread crumbs, dotting it heavily with bits of butter; bake half an hour if the dish be small. It should be covered at first, and the cover removed only just long enough to allow it to brown.

Tomatille. — Cut your veal in thin slices, and about four inches square; make a rich forcemeat stuffing by chopping up very fine a little fat pork, eschalottes, bread crumbs, salt and pepper — bind with the yolk of an egg; put a spoonful of this stuffing on each slice of veal, make it in little balls, and stew them in a rich brown gravy made as follows: Make a roux, add some finely chopped onions, a little stock, season to taste; cook gently, and keep the saucepan closely covered.

Veal Boullets. — Take any cold veal you have left; chop it up finely; add lean ham well chopped, a little fat pork, chopped onions, parsley, salt, and pepper; bind it with the yolk of an egg beaten up with a little flour; make it into flat cakes and fry; serve with any sauce — mayonnaise is excellent.

Sweetbread Croquettes d la Creole (Madame Eugene). — Soak the sweetbreads an hour in warm water, and blanch

them in boiling water until the larding needle can pass through them without tearing them; cut them in dice; cut the same quantity of mushrooms, also, in dice; stew them together in a little white sauce; make them into shapes like a pear, sticking a clove in the end; powder them with bread crumbs and fry; serve with a tomato sauce.

Blanquette of Veal. — Put a lump of butter in a saucepan; when it is melted stir in a good spoonful of flour — do not let it color; pour in by degrees two glasses of boiling water, stirring all the time; add a little chopped onion, parsley, salt, and pepper; cut up in small pieces one and a half pounds of veal, and cook it in this sauce. It will require three hours over a slow fire. If you make your blanquette of cold meats you need only cook it long enough to warm it through. To vary it you can stir in the yolks of two eggs after you remove the saucepan from the fire.

Veal Galantine. — Bone a good shoulder of veal; trim it into a good shape; make a stuffing of some tender meat — either veal, fowls, or game, raw or cooked, taking out all tendons or bones; chop it up with twice the quantity of kidney fat of veal or beef, removing all the membranes which cover it, and mix it well; adding salt, pepper, nutmeg, a little parsley and chives, a pinch of bay leaf and thyme powdered; pound all this well in a wooden or marble mortar; add, by degrees, in pounding, two eggs beaten up — the white of the egg gives consistency to the paste; mix it till it becomes a smooth paste ; spread out the shoulder of veal; season with salt, pepper, and a little nutmeg; then put a layer of the stuffing, then a layer of strips of veal, ham, and bacon, and slices of truffles; roll it all up and tie it tightly; cover it with a cloth and tie it up; line a deep saucepan with strips of bacon and bacon skin, carrots, onions, soup bunch, and cloves; put in the galantine with all the trimmings of the shoulder of veal; season with a little salt; add a little bouillon and a pint of white wine; cook it slowly three hours; drain your galantine, and do not remove the cloth or untie it until it is cold.

To make the jelly, heat your gravy and skim it; beat up the whites of two eggs in a saucepan; pour in by degrees your gravy, beating all the time till the moment it begins to boil; set it back on the stove, cover it, and put hot coals on the cover; let it simmer very slightly; when the whites are nearly cooked add the juice of a lemon, which will clarify it; stretch a napkin over the four feet of a stool turned upside down, put a dish underneath, and strain your jelly gently through; when it is cold, cut it up and decorate your dish with it. You can clarify any gravy or consomme in this manner, and it will be perfectly transparent.

Fricandeau of Veal. — Lard a round of veal very fine and close on the upper side; line the bottom of a saucepan with slices of bacon, carrots, onions, two cloves, and a soup bunch; put your veal in the saucepan and pour over some bouillon. Be careful to baste it from time to time with its own sauce. When the fricandeau is done (it will take from two to three hours to cook) take it out of the saucepan, skim your sauce, remove the soup bunch, reduce the sauce, and when it becomes thick and brown pour it over your fricandeau; serve it on a purée of sorrel, spinach, tomatoes, or celery.

Veal Cooked in its Own Juice. — Lard a round of veal, put it in a saucepan with a good lump of butter, and let it take a good color; add salt, pepper, and a bay leaf; cook it over a slow fire two or three hours; skim the gravy, pour a little water in the saucepan, mix it well with the gravy, and serve.

Ragout of Veal. — Cut the breast of veal in pieces three

inches square, fry them a light brown in butter, and take them out of the saucepan; make a roux in the same saucepan with two spoonfuls of flour; pour in two glasses of water or bouillon ; put back the veal; add a carrot, an onion stuck with cloves, a soup bunch, salt, and pepper, a pinch of sugar, some little onions fried beforehand in butter, and some mushrooms; when it is all well cooked remove the soup bunch, skim, and serve.

Round of Veal with Anchovies. — Take the bone out of a round of veal; flatten it and lard it with anchovies; salt (very little) and pepper; pour a glassful of vinegar over it and let it steep eight hours; wipe it dry; sprinkle it with a little flour, and put it in a frying-pan with a little olive-oil; cook it over a slow fire, and let both sides brown nicely; when it is done serve it on a dish, add a little stock to your sauce, season with salt and pepper, add the juice of a lemon, stir it well, and pour over your veal; serve hot.

Roast Veal with Fine Herbs. — Lard a loin well with lard, seasoned with salt, pepper, and fine herbs; steep it in a dish three hours, with sliced onions, chopped parsley, mushrooms, a bay leaf, thyme, esehalottes, pepper, salt, and olive-oil; when it is well seasoned, put it on the spit, pour over it all the seasoning, and envelop it in two buttered sheets of white paper, and let it cook before a slow fire; when it is done remove the paper, and take off with the point of a knife all the little herbs that adhere to the meat and paper; put them in the saucepan with the gravy, a dash of vinegar, a piece of butter in which a little flour has been kneaded, a little salt and pepper; mix all well together, and serve with the roast.

Veal Grillade à la Créole, No. 1. — Cut slices of tender young veal; put in a saucepan a spoonful of lard, in which you slice and fry two onions, half a dozen fine, large, ripe tomatoes, salt, and pepper (red pepper); then put the slices of' veal in the saucepan and let it cook, adding a little sprinkle of flour for thickening; serve it hot with hominy, made of grits, for breakfast. If you need more sauce, add more tomatoes, or a little water.

Veal Grillade, No. 2. — Take slices of either veal, beef, mutton, or pork; cut them in slices of equal length and thickness; steep them in a little oil, pepper, parsley, onions, and salt, all minced together, and let them half cook in the saucepan; take little paper boxes, well greased with oil, put the grillade in them with all the seasoning, and grate over them some bread crumbs; cover them with a sheet of paper, and cook them slowly on a gridiron; when the sauce is made put in a little vinegar, and pour this over the grillade, which you serve in the paper boxes.

Veal Cutlets en Papillotes. — Make a stuffing of bread crumbs, chopped onions, pieces of fat pork chopped very fine, mushrooms, eschalottes, salt, and pepper; choose fine cutlets; shape them nicely; spread a layer of this stuffing on both sides of your cutlets; cover each side with a thin slice of bacon; envelop it carefully in a buttered paper in the form of a large heart; cook three quarters of an hour on a gridiron, over a slow fire, and serve it in the paper.

Pâté of Calf's Liver. — Three pounds of liver; half a pound of round of veal; half a pound of fillet of beef; half a pound of fresh pork; quarter of a pound of fat salt pork; half a pound of sausage meat; a lump of beef marrow as large as a walnut; an onion; a clove of garlic; parsley; eschalottes; chevril; two cloves; a little nutmeg; salt and pepper.

Pound the liver, and chop the veal, beef, and pork very fine; put this in a mould; cook it two hours in an oven or in the stove; serve cold and grated.

Bordelaise Cutlets. — Shape your cutlets nicely; season with salt and pepper and a dash of nutmeg; make a stuffing of fat meat and veal chopped very fine, bread crumbs, chopped eschalottes, and parsley; bind with the yolk of an egg, and season with salt and pepper; spread this over each cutlet; brush them over with beaten egg, and sprinkle with bread crumbs; put them in a baking-dish well buttered, with fire above and below; when done arrange them on a dish; pour a little bouillon and a dash of vinegar in the baking-dish to make a gravy, which you pour over the chops.

Ragout of Kidneys. — Slice the kidneys, and remove the little hard pieces in the middle; put a lump of butter in a saucepan and fry your kidneys two minutes, season with salt and pepper, sprinkle in a little flour, add a few sliced mushrooms, and pour in some white or red wine and a little bouillon; cook your sauce till it thickens, and pour it over the kidneys.

Liver Stewed. — Slice the liver and lay in salt and water for an hour; then cut into dice and put on the fire with enough cold water to cover it well; cover and stew for an hour; when done add a little salt, pepper, mace, sweet marjoram, parsley, and a teaspoonful of Worcestershire sauce; stew again for half an hour longer; then add a tablespoonful of butter, two of browned flour wet with cold water, a teaspoonful of lemon juice, and one of currant jelly; boil five minutes and dish. A little sherry is an improvement.

Sparkle

Fried Liver. — Slice very thinly and lay in salt and water for half an hour; then wipe dry, flour well, and arrange in a frying-pan with a little butter; when almost cooked add a little salt, pepper, powdered parsley, and three tablespoonfuls of lemon juice; when well browned take them from the fire and serve in hot dish.

Stewed Liver (Florentine fashion). — Chop very finely some shallots, carrots, a little celery, parsley, and a few truffles or dried mushrooms, half a laurel leaf, a little thyme, and basil; add some salt, pepper, and a pinch of nutmeg; cut the liver into thin slices and then into small squares; put a layer of liver in the bottom of a casserole with a little butter; cover this with a layer of the chopped vegetables, then put another layer of liver, and so on until the casserole is quite full; cover closely and cook slowly, with fire below and above, for an hour; serve the liver in a hot dish with the vegetables arranged round it; pour over all a piquant sauce.

Calf's Liver Roasted (" Common-Sense in the Household "). — Soak the liver in salt and water an hour to draw out the blood; wipe dry, and stuff with forcemeat made of bread crumbs, two slices of fat salt pork chopped small, a shallot, pepper, salt, and nutmeg, sweet marjoram and thyme, and, if you choose, a little sage; moisten this with butter melted in a very little hot water, and two raw eggs well beaten. In order to get this into the liver, make an incision with a narrow, sharp knife, and move the point dexterously to and fro to enlarge the cavity; stuff this full of forcemeat and sew up the orifice, lard with strips of salt pork, and baste with butter and water at first, afterwards with the gravy in the dripping-pan; roast for an hour; pour the gravy over the liver when done. Roasted liver is very good cold, cut in slices like tongue.

Imitation Pates de Foie Gras of Liver. — Boil a calf's liver in water that has been slightly salted, and in another vessel a nice calf's tongue. It is best to do this the day before the patSs are made, as they should be not only cold, but firm, when used. Cut the liver into bits, and rub them gradually to a smooth paste in a Wedgewood mortar, moistening, as you go on, with melted butter; work into this paste, which should be quite soft, a quarter teaspoonful of cayenne pepper, or twice the quantity of white or black, half a grated nutmeg, a little cloves, a teaspoonful of Worcestershire sauce, salt to taste, a full teaspoonful of made mustard, and a tablespoonful of boiling water, in which an onion has been steeped until the flavor is extracted; work all together thoroughly, and pack in jellyjars with air-tight covers, or, if you have them, in pate jars; butter the inside of the jars, well, and pack the pate very hard, inserting here and there square and triangular bits of the tongue, which should be pared and cut up for this purpose. These simulate the truffles imbedded in the genuine pates from Strasburg and elsewhere. When the jar is packed and smooth as marble on the surface, cover with melted butter; let this harden, put on the lid, and set away in a cool place. In winter it will keep for weeks, and is very nice for luncheon or tea. Make into sandwiches, or set on in the jars if they are nice and ornamental. These gates are really very good, and resemble in taste the realpate defoie gras. Pigs' livers make it very fair pate. The livers of several fowls, however, treated as above, make even more satisfactory pates than the above, particularly if you can get real truffles.

Calf's Head Stewed. — Scald the head in boiling water in which a little lye has been dissolved. When the hair has been completely removed, scald again carefully; then wash the head in several waters, take out the brains, and set them by in a cool place; tie the head in a floured cloth, and boil two hours in hot water slightly salted; wash the brains carefully, picking out all the bits of skin and membrane, and cleansing them until perfectly white; then stew in just enough water to cover them; boil the head until the meat slips easily from the bones; then cut the meat into small even squares, and stew in the water in which the head was boiled, adding, also, a bunch of sweet herbs, a pinch of sugar, a piece of butter the size of an egg, and a glassful of Madeira, and thickening with a teaspoonful of brown flour moistened with cold water; make small croquettes of the brains, which should be poached, not fried; serve in the dish with the stew, arranging the croquettes round the stew in the centre.

Calves' Brains in Shells. — In using calves' brains be careful always to have them fresh. This being secured, boil two calves' brains, cut them into small pieces, put them into an earthen saucepan, and season them with pepper and salt; put into a casserole several tablespoonfuls of Mchamel sauce, strained; mix with it, little by little, several tablespoonfuls of stock; when it is smooth and creamy add four teaspoonfuls of fine herbs, roasted and crumbled to powder; two minutes after add the brains, mashing and stirring well so that they are smoothly mixed with the cream; fill some shells with this mixture, dust with grated bread crumbs, put into the oven long enough to brown, and serve at once.

Cromesquis of Calves' Brains. — Pour into a casserole a glassf ul of good, strong brown sauce, made according to any of the foregoing receipts; mix with it, little by little, four tablespoonfuls of melted stock (beef) and a wineglassful of Madeira; when it is thick and smooth withdraw from the fire and add two calves' brains, boiled and cut into dice as above; add, also, half the quantity of boiled mushrooms and as much red tongue, cut into small squares; mix all together, season to taste with salt and a soupcon of mustard, and set away to cool; when cold form into small rolls, envelop each in a paste made of flour and water, rolled thin; dip the cromesquis first into beaten egg, then in rolled bread crumbs, and fry quickly; drain, and serve on a folded napkin.

Roast Sweetbreads. — Clean and skin four sweetbreads; then heat them almost to boiling; remove from the casserole, drain, wipe dry, and lai d them; put them into a deep dish and pour over them a little melted butter, then cover them carefully with a chopped onion and a little thyme and laurel; cover the dish and let them soak for an hour; then remove the vegetables, envelop each of the sweetbreads in white buttered paper, put them on the spit, or on a skewer, and roast before a clear fire for half an hour; remove the paper, baste them with their own drippings until brown, then glaze with a salamander, and serve on a very hot dish, surrounded with freshly boiled and tender green pease.

Fried Sweetbreads. — Blanch three or four moderately large sweetbreads, drain, and allow them to cool; remove all strings and skin, and cut into slices half an inch thick; season with salt and pepper and dust with flour; beat two eggs very light, yolks and whites together; add two teaspoonfuls of fine herbs roasted and powdered; dip the slices of sweetbread in this, roll in bread crumbs, and fry quickly in butter or drippings; drain on soft paper, arrange on a folded napkin, and serve with a little fried parsley.

Stewed Sweetbreads. — Wash carefully and remove all fibrous and fatty matter, and as much skin as possible; then put into a saucepan, cover with cold water, and heat to a boil; pour off the hot water, and cover with cold until the sweetbreads are firm; when firm stew in a very little water, and when tender add for each sweetbread a heaping teaspoonful of butter, a little chopped parsley, pepper and salt to taste, and some rich cream; let them simmer for five minutes, and serve in the sauce in which they have been stewed.

Or, you may lard the sweetbreads and make a brown gravy, substituting for the cream a glassful of good wine. In this case do not cook the sweetbreads in the sauce. Let it boil up once and pour over them.

Sweetbread d la Financiere. — Scrape and skin two sweetbreads, then blanch, dip in cold water, and put under a slight pressure; when quite cold trim, and season them with salt and pepper; then lay them in a buttered saucepan and cook for two or three minutes, turning them constantly; then add half a tumblerful of good white bouillon and cook until it thickens; then turn the sweetbreads, add another half glassful of white bouillon, and cook as before; then arrange in a circle on a very hot dish, cover, and set in a hot place while you prepare the financiere.

Pour into the saucepan in which the sweetbreads were cooked a glassful of Rhine wine, boil, and strain; skim and put back into the saucepan, cook until it thickens, and add an equal quantity of brown sauce, and four raw truffles peeled and cut into quarters; cook five minutes, and add some button mushrooms and a pinch of cayenne; when it boils up take it from the fire, add to it twenty small forcemeat balls, poached, and pour all into the hollow left by the circle of sweetbreads. (Delicious.)

Sweetbread Croquettes (Augustine's). — Cut into dice three or four cooked sweetbreads, and mix with them half the quantity of breast of boiled chicken pounded to a paste, and a little rolled bread crumbs softened with rich cream; mix all smoothly together, adding more cream, as much as is necessary to soften the paste; when very soft — as soft as it can be and hold together — season with salt, white pepper, and a soupçon of nutmeg; set aside to cool; when cold form into oval balls, rolling in bread crumbs, dipping in beaten egg, then rolling in bread crumbs again; fry in a wire basket, drain on soft paper, and serve on a folded napkin, or on a dish surrounded by green pease.

Sweetbreads á, la Virginie. — Prepare the sweetbreads very carefully and blanch; put them into a strong stock of chicken or beef, well seasoned with onion and celery; simmer gently for three hours; take them out, drain, and fry in lard to a light brown; serve on a very hot dish surrounded by green pease.

Sweetbreads á la Blanchette. — Prepare the sweetbreads as above, and blanch; put them into a strong chicken stock flavored with onion and celery; simmer gently for three hours; take them out, drain, and serve in a rich white sauce with a good deal of roasted parsley in it.

MUTTON.

Roast Saddle of Mutton á la Virginie. — Wash the saddle thoroughly, inside and out, with good vinegar; do not wipe it, but hang up to dry in a cool cellar; when quite dry cover with a clean cloth, or tie in a loose muslin bag; sponge off with vinegar every other day for a fortnight, keeping the meat in a very cold place and always covered. When ready to cook wipe it carefully with a clean cloth, and roast, basting for the first two hours with butter and water, and afterwards with the gravy. A large saddle of mutton will require four hours to roast; when roasted, dish on a hot dish, and keep covered while you skim the gravy, and add half a teacupful of mushroom catsup, a glassful of Madeira wine, and a tablespoonful of browned flour; boil up once, and send to table in a sauce-boat; always serve currant jelly with mutton.

Mutton Ham (" Common-Sense in the Household "). — Leg of mutton weighing twelve pounds; one ounce of black pepper; a quarter of a pound of brown sugar; one ounce of saltpetre; one and a quarter pounds of salt.

The day after the sheep is killed, mix the sugar, pepper, and saltpetre, and rub thoroughly into the meat for fifteen minutes, until the outer part is thoroughly impregnated with the seasoning. Put the ham into a large earthenware vessel and cover it with the salt; let it remain thus for three weeks, turning it daily and basting it with the brine, adding to this, after the first week, a teacupful of vinegar. When the ham is removed from the pickle, wash with cold water, then with vinegar, and hang it up in a cool cellar for a week, at least, before it is used. Soak an hour in fair water before boiling.

Or, if you choose to smoke it for several days after it is earned, it can be chipped and eaten raw like dried beef.

Mutton Chops. — Trim off all superfluous fat and skin, and broil on a gridiron over a clear fire; when cooked, salt and pepper lightly, and stick a bit of butter on each. Chops must be rare always. A too well done chop is a chop spoiled.

Stewed Mutton Cutlets. — Cut and shape the cutlets from the best part of the neck; cut the bones short and scrape the ends, and take most of the fat off; put them into a deep dish, after they have been peppered and salted, with seasoned beef gravy; let them stew for three hours in a slow oven; the dish should be kept covered; serve with the liquor in which they have been stewed, to which a teaspoonful of mushroom catsup and the same of tarragon vinegar have been added; arrange in a circle on a round dish, putting mashed potatoes or mashed turnips in the middle. These cutlets look better if glazed a dark brown before being sent to table.

Broiled Mutton Cutlets. — Cut the cutlets out of a piece of the best end of a neck of mutton; they should be less than half an inch thick and neatly trimmed, with not too much fat left on them; give them a few blows with the bat, and grill them on or in front of the fire, which should be clear and fierce, so that each cutlet be full of juice when cut; sprinkle with salt, and arrange in a circle round a heap of potato sautèes.

Two Dishes from One Leg of Mutton. — Cut the leg of mutton cleanly across the meat and bone from the shank down, with as much meat as will suffice for the meal; rub it and flour it all over, but especially the cut-meat surface; plunge it at once into a saucepan or pot of boiling water to cover it completely, adding some salt, a few grains of pepper, and a bunch of parsley; draw away from the fire and allow the water to cool almost completely, then put again to the fire and cook slowly, according to weight, till quite done to taste; serve with parsley, onions, capers, sorrel, or any sauce preferred.

Or, it may be stewed, as above, with a great variety of vegetables. The flour and the plunging into boiling water will prevent the juice from escaping, and the meat will cut as finely as from a whole boiled leg of mutton.

Mutton Steak. — From the rest of the leg of mutton cut cleanly and evenly a slice from the full round of two or three inches thick; pepper and flour both sides at once, and insert a piece of shallot onion in the bone eye; broil the meat slowly on a beefsteak griddle, covering the upper surface with chopped beef marrow, butter, or mutton kidney fat; prepare a brown gravy with fried shallots, brown stock, a few peppercorns, two cloves, some lemon rings or juice, or a spoonful of tarragon vinegar; strain, and add some split olives or pounded anchovies.

Boiled Leg of Mutton à l' Anglaise. — Put your leg of mutton in boiling water (salted); add twelve whole turnips, trimmed and cleaned; let it boil till done. You allow half an hour for every three pounds of the meat. Drain it and serve it on a dish surrounded by the turnips; decorate the handle of the gigot with frilled paper; serve with caper sauce.

Sheep Kidneys. — Slice your kidneys; put them in a saucepan with a lump of butter, sliced onion, chopped parsley, and a little flour; add a little water or bouillon, salt and pepper, and, just before serving, a glassful of Madeira

Hochepot. — Cut up pieces of the breast, shoulder, and chops; fry them in butter in a saucepan; take them out and make a roux in your saucepan; when it browns add water, salt, pepper, a soup bunch, and a clove of garlic; put back your mutton, and when it is nearly done add some turnips which you have fried in butter till they are a gold color; cook half an hour, skim, and serve. You can substitute Irish potatoes and carrots for turnips.

Stewed Breast of Mutton. — Cut your breast in pieces; stew it in a saucepan with butter, a little water, onions, a bay leaf, salt and pepper; just before serving stir in a cupful of cream and a little chopped parsley.

Blakeley Mutton Pâté. — Boil the head, liver, and haslets; drain well; remove all the meat from the head; take out the brains; remove all gristle and tendons from the liver and haslets; pound all this in a mortar to a paste; season this with grated onions, a bay leaf, thyme, and parsley, salt and pepper, sliced ceps and truffles, half a clove of garlic, pounded; moisten with olive-oil, and bind it with yolks of three eggs; pour this in a china mould and bake; serve cold.

Baked Leg of Mutton with Anchovies and Ham. — Pound your gigot; lard it with six cloves of garlic, salted, and sprinkled with pepper and with strips of lean ham; put your gigot in a saucepan with a quart of good bouillon; add salt, pepper, a bay leaf, nutmeg, a Bordeaux glassful of brandy; cook on a gentle fire.

Make an anchovy butter; pound a dozen anchovies (from which you have removed the bones) into a paste, and mix them with six ounces of fresh butter. It should be made the moment the gigot is cooked.

Take your gigot out of the saucepan for a moment; let your sauce boil up; skim it, and pour it in the saucepan with your anchovy butter; return your gigot to the saucepan, and let it set on hot coals until you are ready to serve; dress your gigot on a dish and pour over the sauce.

Saddle of Mutton with Parsley. — Lard your saddle with fresh parsley, just as you would with strips of bacon; spit it and baste it well. It will require one hour and a half to cook.

Stuffed Roast Leg of Mutton. — Lift up the dry skin that covers the leg carefully, without taking it off entirely; lard your gigot with celery half cooked in bouillon, slices of pickles, tender bunches of estragon bleached, strips of fat pork; season it well, and sprinkle it with chopped anchovies; draw the skin over the stuffing, fasten it carefully with thread, put it on the spit, and serve it in its own juice.

Mutton Stew (Old Virginia dish). — Take pieces of cold roast mutton, cut them up in dice, and put them in a chafing-dish with a large lump of butter, a glassful of currant jelly, some mango pickles sliced, and a glassful of good old Madeira; salt and pepper; light the spirit-lamp, let it heat through, and serve hot.

Mutton Tongues. — Soak them an hour or two in cold water, then throw them in boiling water until you can remove the hard skin which covers them; trim them, cut out the hard piece, and split them in two — lengthwise; cook them in a saucepan with slices of bacon, chopped mushrooms, salt, spices, parsley, and thyme, and serve.

Mutton Tongues with Tomatoes. — Boil and skin your tongue; split it lengthwise; season, and pour over it a rich tomato sauce.

Cutlets à la Victime. — Fasten three cutlets together, the finest one in the middle; broil them on the gridiron, turning them several times that the juice may concentrate in the middle one; when the upper and lower ones are more than done put them aside, and serve only the middle one. This was a favorite dish of Louis XVIII.

Cutlets à la Milanaise. — Dip your cutlets in melted butter, and then into pounded bread crumbs and grated parmesan cheese; beat up two eggs, dip your cutlets in this, then again into the bread crumbs and cheese; fry them in butter, and serve them with tomato sauce.

Veiled Cutlets. — Take fillet cutlets — those without bones — trim and flatten them, cover them with a thin layer of sausage meat in which you chop a few truffles; envelop them in the thin membrane that covers the fat of pork, and broil them.

Cutlets à la Vinaigrette. — Cook your chops in a fryingpan with butter; when they are done drain them on brown paper; add several spoonfuls of bouillon to the butter, eschalottes, fine herbs, salt and pepper, and pickles cut in slices; let it boil up; dress your cutlets on a dish; pour the sauce over them, adding a dash of vinegar.

LAMB.

The receipts given above for mutton apply equally to lamb; but the cook must always bear in mind that though lamb may be stewed, it ought never to be boiled, and that underdone lamb is an abomination, and also indigestible.

Quarter of Lamb Larded and Roasted. — Lard the lamb carefully with a larding needle, envelop in buttered paper, and roast on the spit, or in a Dutch oven; when almost cooked, remove the paper, dust lightly with salt and roasted parsley, and serve with maitre d' hôtel sauce.

Fillets of Lamb à la Béchamel. — Make a good béchamel sauce; when you are ready to serve, put into it some cold roast lamb cut into very thin slices, heat, but do not boil, and, when very hot, serve.

Lamb à la Poulette. — Blanch a quarter of lamb; then put a lump of butter into a casserole together with a spoonful of fine flour; when the flour and butter are well amalgamated, add two or three glassfuls of boiling water; add the water little by little so that it may mix well with the butter; when the sauce is smooth and clear, put in the lamb, pepper, salt, a bunch of sweet herbs, some button onions; half an hour before serving add some mushrooms; when cooked, put the lamb on a very hot dish, and arrange the onions and mushrooms in such a way as to garnish it; strain the sauce, beat up with it the yolk of an egg, pour over the lamb, and

PORK.

GENERAL DIRECTIONS.

All hogs should be kept shut up, and well fed for three weeks before they are killed; their sties should be cleaned daily, and they should be furnished with an abundance of fresh water. A pig should not be allowed to cat anything for twenty-four hours before he is killed. After killing be very careful to keep the pork from tainting. It spoils very easily. All kinds of pork should be cooked thoroughly. Underdone pork is very unwholesome, as well as unpalatable.

Pork requires a great deal of cooking, and is never fit to eat when underdone. Otherwise the usual rules for roasting and boiling meats will apply to it. Pork chops and steaks are cooked as those of mutton or beef.

Loin of Pork Roasted. — Loin of pork is generally scored across the skin, and may be stuffed with a rich stuffing of bread, onion, and herbs; apple sauce is generally eaten with all roast pork.

Young Pig Boasted. — Prepare for roasting, and stuff as you would a turkey, but put more onion and dried and powdered herbs in the stuffing; serve on a hot dish, surrounded by a wreath of crisped parsley and sliced lemon.

Austrian Roast Pig. — Kill your pig; lay it in cold water fifteen minutes; then plunge it in boiling water; scrape the hair off; clean it perfectly; cut it open; take out the entrails; wash thoroughly with clear water; then with soda and water, and lastly with salt and water; make a stuffing with the pig's liver, fat pork, truffles, mushrooms, a little garlic, capers, hazelnuts, thyme and parsley, salt and red pepper; fry it in your frying-pan, and stuff your pig; sew him up and truss; bend his fore-feet backwards, his hind-feet forwards, under and close to the body; take a sharp knife, cut the skin of the pig in diamonds; rub your pig with melted butter or oil; put it to roast with a little hot water, slightly salted, in the dripping-pan; baste with butter and water; rub it over every few moments with oil to have the skin crisp; it requires two hours to cook over a brisk and steady fire; serve it with an apple in its mouth, and garnish the dish with parsley, chiccory, or curled celery.

Roast Sparerib. — When put down to the fire, cover with greased paper until half done, then remove the paper and dredge with flour. Afterwards baste with butter, and lastly with the gravy of the sparerib itself; just before taking it up dust with rolled bread crumbs, a finely minced shallot, pepper, salt, and powdered sage; let it cook five minutes longer, basting it meanwhile with butter; skim the gravy; add half a cupful of red wine; thicken with browned flour; add the juice of a lemon; strain, and pour over the sparerib.

Roast Chine. — Score deeply and closely the strip of skin running along the neck; then roast as you roast sparerib.

Baked Pork and Beans. — One quart of small white beans, washed, picked over, and soaked all night in lukewarm water, which should be changed twice for more and warmer water; one pound of the middling of salt pork.

In the morning pour the water off the beans, and put them into an earthen crock; score very deeply the salt pork and imbed it in the beans, leaving the skin level with the beans; cover all barely with water in which a heaping tablespoonful of molasses has been stirred; add some black pepper; then cover all with a stiff, thick dough of flour and water, leaving a hole in the middle for the beans to brown; bake all day, very slowly, in a cool oven; lift the dough occasionally to see if there is enough water; if too dry, add boiling water; towards the last the beans should absorb all the water; remove the paste and serve the pork and beans in the crock in which they were cooked. Earthenware crocks made expressly for this purpose may be bought in New England.

Pork and Beans. — One quart of white beans; one pound of salt pork.

Prepare beans and pork for cooking as above, but in the morning boil the beans, putting them on to boil in cold water; when soft drain off the water, put the beans in a deep earthenware dish, the pork in the middle; add a very little warm water, a tablespoonful of molasses, black pepper to taste, and bake a nice brown.

Pork-and-Pease Pudding. — One quart of dried split pease, soaked over-night in water; one pound of salt pork (lean), soaked over-night also.

In the morning put the pease on to boil slowly until tender; drain and rub through a colander; season with pepper and salt, and add two eggs well beaten, two tablespoonfuls of butter, a teaspoonful of brown sugar, and pepper to taste; beat all well together, and tie loosely in a floured pudding cloth;' put it, with the pork, into warm water, and boil together for an hour; lay the pork in a dish, turn out the pudding, slice, and arrange about the meat.

Boiled Ham, No. 1. — A ham should be put into cold water enough to cover it. As soon as the water boils set it aside, where it will only simmer, for eight hours; then take it out, remove the skin, and put the ham again into the kettle, and let it remain until the water has cooled; then take it out, trim it nicely, sprinkle over it pounded cracker and brown sugar, and brown in an oven.

Boiled Ham, No. 2. — Soak over-night in cold water; in the morning wash and put on to boil in cold water; allow a quarter of an hour to a pound, and do not boil too fast; skin, and brown as above.

Baked Ham. — Wash carefully and soak over-night a medium-sized ham; early in the morning put it into fresh water enough to cover it, and set it on the fire to boil; when it begins to boil set it back, and let it simmer for four hours, filling the boiler, as it needs, with boiling water; take it out at the expiration of the four hours, and skin it while hot; trim off the edges carefully and neatly; then grate over it (half an inch deep) bread crumbs and a sprinkle of brown sugar; put the ham into a dripping-pan with half a pint of its own drippings (in which you have dissolved a pinch of brown sugar) and a pint of Madeira wine; put in the oven to bake, and baste every few minutes until the ham is well browned and every drop of the wine absorbed.

Steamed Ham. — Soak in cold water twelve hours; then wash, rubbing thoroughly with a stiff brush; plunge again, for a moment, in cold water; take out the ham, put into a steamer, cover closely, and set over a pot of boiling water; keep the water at a hard boil, and allow twenty minutes to a pound; skin, sprinkle with bread crumbs, etc., as for boiled ham.

Roast Ham, No. 1. — Take a new ham that has been salted some weeks only; if smoked, parboil it before roasting; while it is before the fire baste it with white wine and loaf sugar; when half done remove the skin, stick the ham full of cloves, and let it roast as long again, basting it with fresh wine and sugar until thoroughly cooked.

Roast Ham, No. 2 (" Common-Sense in the Household"). — Soak a large ham for two days in lukewarm water, changing the water at least six times a day; take it out, wash thoroughly, and trim away the black and rusty edges; skin carefully and completely; lay in a dish, and sponge with a cloth dipped in the following mixture, which should be well mixed: One tumblerful of white wine; half a gill of strong vinegar; one tablespoonful of white sugar, heaped; one saltspoonful of made mustard.

Do this thoroughly once every hour — turning the ham and sponging every part of it — all day until bedtime; renew the process in the morning until six hours before you need the meat; put it on the spit, and add to the mixture above mentioned a cupful of boiling water; baste the ham perpetually with this until it drips freely, then baste with its own drippings; when cooked cover the ham with rolled bread crumbs worked to a paste with cream, butter, beaten egg, and a little pepper, and return to the oven to brown; skim the gravy, add a glassful of good wine, a tablespoonful of walnut catsup, the juice of a lemon, and a soupçon of nutmeg; boil up, and send to table in a sauce-boat.

Barbecued Ham. — Cut in slices; wash well and soak in very hot water for half an hour; pour off the water and add more, scalding hot; let the ham stand half an hour; then take it out, wipe dry, lay in cold water for five minutes, wipe dry again, and arrange the slices in a large frying-pan, putting on each slice a saltspoonful of made mustard and half a teaspoonful of vinegar; pepper well; fry quickly and turn often; when done to a fine brown transfer to a hot dish, add to the gravy in the pan half a glassful of wine and a very small teaspoonful of white sugar; boil up and pour over the meat.

Broiled Ham. — Soak, etc., as above, and broil on a well buttered gridiron over a clear, fierce fire.

Broiled Ham au Gratin (Cuisinière Bourgeoise). — Soak, etc., as above; dip each slice in beaten egg and bread crumbs, and broil on a buttered gridiron over it clear fire.

Fried Ham. — Take raw ham; slice and soak as above; cook in a hot frying-pan, turning often until done; pour over the ham, when dished, the gravy in the frying-pan; if you choose you may add to the gravy in the frying-pan a little cream thickened with flour, and a teaspoonful of powdered parsley; boil up once and pour over the ham.

Cold Ham, Fried. — Cut thick slices of cold boiled ham, dip in beaten egg, then in rolled bread crumbs, and fry in fat extracted from bits of salt pork; take the dry fried pork from the pan before putting in the ham; garnish with curled parsley.

Ham and Eggs. — Cut the raw ham in large, even slices; soak and dry as usual; fry quickly in a large frying-pan; the moment they are done put into a hot dish, cover, and fry the eggs in the fat left by the ham; take care that the eggs do not touch each other; fry them three minutes, lay one egg on each slice of ham, and serve.

Ham Sandwiches. — Cut some rather stale bread very thin, having previously grated off the crust; butter each slice on the loaf before cutting it; lay between every two slices some cold boiled ham from which you have removed the fat; spread the meat with a very little mustard.

Ground-Ham Sandwiches. — Grind some cold boiled ham very fine, then dry in the oven to a light powder. Take an oblong white loaf, rather stale; grate off the crust; butter as above; spread thickly with ground ham, cut very thin, and roll up like wafers. These are very pretty sandwiches.

Ham-and-Chicken Sandwiches. — Equal quantities of cold roast chicken and boiled ham; mince very fine; put into a saucepan with enough gravy — veal or chicken — to make a soft paste; or, failing gravy, use cream, hot water, and a lump of butter; cook five minutes, then take from the fire and spread on a dish to cool. Cut (with a cake cutter) some white bread into rounds, half or a quarter of an inch thick; butter, spread with grated cheese, then with the mince, and press the rounds firmly together.

Lard. — Take leaf lard, skin carefully, wash, drain, cut into bits, throw in a large tin kettle, and set this in a pot of boiling water; stir from time to time, letting it simmer gently until clear, throwing in, also, a little salt to make the sediment settle; when quite hot and clear strain through a coarse cloth into jars, being careful not to press it. Lard keeps longer and better in small jars. Cover with bladder.

To Try out Lard. — Take all the fatty portions of pork left next the skin of the hog; scrape from the rind and cut into dice; fill a large pot, put in a cupful of water to prevent burning, and melt very slowly, stirring every three minutes; simmer until nothing remains of the meat but fibrous bits; remove these carefully with a perforated skimmer, throw in a little salt to settle the fat, and when clear, strain through a coarse cloth into small jars. Remember to simmer gently over a steady fire, stirring constantly and from the bottom until the salt is thrown in to settle it, then withdraw it to a less hot part of the fire until clear. Do not leave it an instant; a moment's burning will ruin everything.

Headcheese. — Boil the head, ears, and tongue in salted water until tender; strip the meat from the bones, and cut the tongue into oblongs, squares, and triangles; grind the rest of the meat fine; season with salt, pepper, sage, sweet marjoram, powdered cloves, and half a cupful of strong vinegar; mix all together thoroughly, and pack hard in moulds or bowls; press down the meat tightly; put a wet plate and a heavy weight on each for two days. If you wish to keep it for weeks, immerse the cheese in cold vinegar in stone jars. Headcheese is good cold; but may be sliced, dipped in beaten egg and bread crumbs, and fried; or else cut in slices and seasoned slightly with mustard, and warmed.

Pork Potpie. — Line a well-buttered pot with good, light paste; put in a layer of chine of pork, cut into riblets; then a layer of parboiled potatoes, sliced; season with salt and pepper; proceed in this way until the pot is nearly full, putting some strips of paste into each layer; then pour in a quart of cold water and put on the upper crust, cutting a slit in it; put on the pot-lid and boil from an hour and a half to two hours; when done lay in upper crust in a large, hot dish, put in the meat, etc., and cover with the lower crust.

Ham-and-chicken Pie. — Line a buttered pie-dish with good puff paste, and fill up with alternate layers of cold ham and boiled chicken, interspersing each layer with slices of hard-boiled egg buttered and peppered; then pour in a cupful of chicken and roux, cover with paste, and bake an hour.

Brawn. — Pig's head weighing six pounds; one pound of lean beef; one shallot minced fine; one teaspoonful of salt; half a teaspoonful of pepper; half a teaspoonful of cayenne; half a teaspoonful of mace; one pinch of cloves.

Clean and wash the head, and stew with the beef in enough cold water to cover; when the flesh is loosened from the bones, remove them and drain off the liquor; grind the meat finely while it is hot; season, mix, and pour into a tin boar's head wet with cold water.

Saveloys. — Eight pounds of pork (soaked in a brine of salt and water with a tablespoonful of saltpetre) for three days; four teaspoonfuls of black pepper; one teaspoonful of cayenne; one teaspoonful of cloves or mace; one teacupful of bread crumbs; eight teaspoonfuls of sage, sweet marjoram, and thyme, powdered; a brine of salt and water with a tablespoonful of saltpetre, and leave it for three days.

Dry, mince, season, mix, stuff into skins, and steam over boiling water one hour.

Cheshire Pork Pie. — Two or three pounds of lean fresh pork cut into strips two inches long and one wide; an equal weight of juicy apples, pared, cored, and cut into slices.

Line a buttered dish with puff paste; put in a layer of pork, then of apples covered with an ounce of white sugar, then pork; proceed in this way until the dish is full, seasoning each layer of pork with pepper, salt, and nutmeg; when the dish is full pour in half a pint of sweet cider, and stick bits of butter over the top; cover with a thick lid of puff paste, cut a slit in the top, and bake for an hour and a half; brush the top with beaten egg before baking.

Yorkshire Pork Pie. — Make and bake as above, omitting apples, sugar, and nutmeg, and adding sage to the seasoning.

Hopping John (Old Virginia receipt). — One pint of lady pease; one quart of rice; one pound of bacon.

Boil the pease and bacon together until soft, then add the rice, well washed; stir well, and boil until it boils up; then pour off the water, leaving just enough to cover it; cover and set on a slow fire until thoroughly done; when you pour the water off add a teaspoonful of whole black pepper.

To Cure Hams (Old Virginia receipt). — One hundred pounds of meat; six gallons of hot water; nine pounds of salt; four pounds of brown sugar; three ounces of saltpetre, dissolved alone.

Put all the pickle into a large vessel and boil for half an hour, skimming off the scum; do not put it on the hams until cold; then pour it over so as to saturate them thoroughly, and let it remain a few days; after a fortnight or sixteen days take the hams from the pickling barrel; wash off the pickle, and while wet dip in bran; when well covered with bran hang in the smoke, the hock end downward; keep up a good smoke for four weeks, having the fire partially smothered with hickory chips and sawdust, and being careful not to let the house become hot; then take down the meat, brush off the bran, examine closely for insects, and lay in the hot sun for a day or two.

Hams may be kept packed in slaked ashes, in dry oats, or in bran — best in slaked ashes.

Or, they may be covered with brown paper, then with coarse muslin stitched tightly, and whitewashed.

Or, in coarse muslin coated with a mixture of beeswax and rosin.

Pickled Pork. — Proceed as above; but if you do not smoke, take the pork out of the barrel at the end of a fortnight, rub each piece with salt, and return it to the barrel. If the liquor does not cover it make fresh brine, in the proportion of two pounds of salt, a quarter of an ounce of saltpetre, and a quart of water; boil half an hour, cool, and pour over the pork. Pork should, if possible, be pickled within twenty-four hours after butchering.

Virginia Bacon. — The pork must be well fattened with corn, and not cut out until the day after it is killed; salt it thoroughly with fine salt and ground alum mixed, and a teaspoonful of saltpetre rubbed well into the hocks before the salt is applied; lay it carefully in tubs, with the skin down, for four weeks; at the end of that time hang up the middlings, joints, and chines; have the bones and shoulders covered with nicely burned hickory ashes well sifted; let them lie two weeks, then hang up with the hocks down; keep up a smoke (not fire) as directed for hams. Be careful not to let one piece touch another in hanging.

Towards the spring, when the weather is warm and damp, put in just wood enough to keep alive, and at least once a day a good deal of tobacco and red pepper. This is necessary, as it destroys all flies and insects. It is best, occasionally, to have a smoke of that sort all the spring. Your meathouse must be dry, and have air-holes bored high up in the gable ends, or a lattice door you can lock, opening the close door in fine weather. Kill the hogs on the increase of the moon. By following these directions you are sure to have good bacon.

Never salt pork in whiskey barrels; molasses barrels are best

Virginia Sausage Meat, No. 1. — One bushel of meat, chopped very fine; one teacupful of red pepper; one teacupful of black; one teacupful of sugar; two teacupfuls of sage; one tablespoonful of saltpetre; salt to taste — all powdered fine.

Mix all well together, taste, and add what seasoning seems desirable.

Virginia Sausage Meat, No. 2. — Pick the sausage meat to get out all the pieces of bone and string; wash it in lukewarm water and lay it on a table to drain ; let it stand all night; take off some of the fat from the backbone to mix with the lean; chop fine, and season as above; pack in a close vessel. If you wish to stuff them, use some nicely cleaned chitterlings which have been kept in salt and water ten days or a fortnight; stuff, hang on sticks, and dry. A little smoke improves them; too much makes them bitter.

Sausage, No. 3. — Two pounds of lean pork; two pounds of veal; two pounds of beef suet; peel of half a lemon; one grated nutmeg; one teaspoonful of black pepper; one teaspoonful of brown sugar; five teaspoonfuls of salt; three teaspoonfuls of sweet marjoram and thyme mixed; juice of a lemon.

Stuff in cases. This is very good.

Sausage, No. 4. — Six pounds of lean fresh pork; three pounds of fat; one grated nutmeg; twelve teaspoonfuls of powdered sage; six teaspoonfuls of salt; six teaspoonfuls of black pepper; two teaspoonfuls of mace; two teaspoonfuls of cloves.

Grind the meat in a sausage-mill, mix in the seasoning, and pack in stone jars, pouring melted lard on top.

Bologna Sausage. — Two pounds of lean veal; two pounds of pork; two pounds of beef; two pounds of fat, unsmoked, salt pork; one pound of beef suet; four spoonfuls of savory, thyme, parsley, and marjoram; one grated nutmeg; one teaspoonful of cloves; two teaspoonfuls of black pepper, and the same of red; one minced onion; salt to taste.

Grind, mix well, season, and stuff into beef skins; tie them up, prick each skin in several places, put on the fire in hot water, and heat gradually to boiling-point; boil slowly one hour; take out the skins and lay on fresh, clean straw or hay, in the sun, to dry; rub the outside of the skins with melted butter or fine olive-oil, then with pepper, and hang in a cool, dry place. If properly made and hung this sausage will keep two or three weeks.

Soused Pig's Feet. — Take young and tender feet, cover with water, and boil very slowly; when boiled almost to rags take them from the fire and sprinkle ft little salt over them; set them away to cool, and when cold remove the grease from the top and the bones; take them from - the liquor, and add to the liquor an equal quantity of strong and good vinegar, also a tablespoonful of brown sugar, one and a half tablespoonfuls of salt, whole pepper, cloves, and allspice; boil, throw boiling hot water over the feet, and set away until cold.

Truffled Pig's Feet. — Clean the pig's feet; parboil them; make a stuffing of minced cold pork chopped up with salt, pepper, a grated eschalot, a little grated ham, and slices of truffles, any livers of game or poultry, butter, and a glassful of white wine; let all this simmer together in a saucepan; sprinkle in a little flour to bind the stuffing; drain the pig's feet, take out the bones, stuff them with this stuffing, and wrap them up in the membrane that covers the fat of pork; shape them well, and boil them.

Backbone. — Cut every joint apart; put the backbone of the pig in a saucepan; fricassee it with onions, salt, and pepper; keep your saucepan well covered; add some sliced tomatoes to the fricassee, and sauce.

Lyons Sausage. — Six pounds of lean pork; three pounds of tenderloin beef; three pounds of fat pork; ten ounces of salt; one ounce of powdered pepper; one ounce of whole black pepper; one and a half ounces of saltpetre.

Chop up in a sausage chopper the beef and lean pork; add the fat cut in dice, mix all well together with the seasoning, and set aside twenty-four hours; stuff this in the large intestines of the hog, well cleaned and scraped; make into links, and put them in a deep earthen dish with salt and saltpetre; put some heavy weight on them and leave them eight days; then hang them in the chimney to smoke and dry; when sufficiently smoked take them down, tighten the links, rub them well with the lees of wine in which you have boiled thyme, sage, and laurel leaves; dry them, wrap them in paper, and pack them in a box of ashes; keep them in a cool, dry place, and eat them without cooking.

Truffled Sausage à la Créole. — Six pounds of lean fresh pork; three pounds of fat fresh pork; six teaspoonfuls of cayenne pepper (powdered); half a teaspoonful of powdered saltpetre; salt to taste; one medium-sized box of truffles, chopped in dice.

Chop two pounds of fat pork with six pounds of lean; add salt, pepper, and saltpetre; chop your remaining pound of fat into dice; chop the truffles in the same manner; mix well together, and stuff them into the intestines of the hog; smoke slightly. Always broil them on the gridiron.

Leg of Fresh Pork Stuffed and Roasted. — Take a leg of fresh pork; wash it well; rub it with salt and pepper; cut the skin in squares; make a stuffing with bread crumbs, onions, thyme, parsley, salt, and pepper; bind with egg; make incisions in the pork; stuff with this; roast, basting well, and serve with cranberry sauce.

Smothered Pig's Head. — Clean and split a pig's head; take out the brains, and lay them aside; parboil the head and four feet; slice the liver and heart of the pig; stew them with slices of bacon, onions, parsley, salt and pepper, and a little water; cut the meat off of the feet, and add; pour all this in the saucepan with the head; cover the saucepan, and stew until the head is done; take it out, dress it on a flat dish, and lay around it the slices of liver and heart; strain the gravy, return it to the saucepan; throw in the brains (which you have carefully prepared by washing through several waters); let them cook; pour in a cup of cream; let it boil up; add a lump of butter; dress the brains around the head, and pour the sauce over the head.

Kentucky Fried Pig's Feet. — Clean the pig's feet, split them, sprinkle with salt and pepper, roll them in sifted cornmeal, and fry with bacon.

Stuffed Hog's Head. — Bone a hog's head; take out the tongue and brains; lay the head and brains aside; slice the tongue with equal parts of fat and lean pork; let them steep forty-eight hours in a marinade made of equal parts of vinegar and water, with sliced onions, parsley, savory, estragon, laurel leaf, cloves and nutmeg, salt and pepper; strain these from the marinade and chop them fine, add the brains, and stuff your hog's head with this; tie the head tightly in a white cloth (floured) giving it a good shape; put it in a deep saucepan with the trimmings and bones of the head and one or two feet; cover it with half white wine and water; add thyme, laurel leaf, parsley, cloves, salt, and pepper; cook it eight hours over a slow fire; take the head out, squeeze it hard to extract all the liquor, remove the cloth, and serve cold. Keep the saucepan well covered.

Blood Pudding. — Three and a half pounds of fresh fat pork; three quarts of blood; one pint of thick sweet cream; blanch and chop two quarts of onions; put them in a saucepan with eight ounces of lard; remove the fibres from the fat pork (choose that nearest the skin); cut it in dice, and put this in the saucepan; add the blood and cream, chopped parsley, pepper, salt, and spices; mix well; taste to see if sufficiently seasoned; stuff this in hog entrails; make it into links ten inches long; prick them with a needle to prevent them from bursting in cooking; have a caldron of hot water on the stove, throw in your blood pudding, and let it cook, never letting it boil; prick them with a needle — if no blood comes out, they are done; drain them, wipe them dry with a towel, and rub them over with fat bacon skin; when cold, stick them with the point of a knife, and broil them over a gentle fire.

To make the celebrated Boudin de Nancy, add an apple marmalade made without sugar.

Boudin Blanc. — Peel and chop in dice twenty onions, blanch them in boiling water, and drain them; cook them in a saucepan with eight ounces of lard; chop and pound equal parts of fat fresh pork and roasted fowl with the same quantity of bread crumbs, which have been steeped in cream, and squeezed dry; mix this with the yolks of six raw eggs, salt and pepper, and half a pint of sweet cream; pour all this in the saucepan with the onions; mix well together, and stuff just as you would blood pudding; cook them in the same manner; when cold, place them on the griddle on a piece of buttered paper, prick them slightly, and cook over a gentle fire.

Sliced Ham, Tomato Sauce. — Make a rich tomato sauce, with butter, onions, salt, and pepper; broil your uncooked slices of ham, and pour the sauce over, and serve hot.

Sliced Ham with Cream Sauce. — Made as above, substituting a rich cream sauce for the tomatoes.

Pâté of Pig’s Liver. — Three and a half pounds of pig's liver; three pounds of fat salt bacon; half a pound of fresh fat pork.

Pound in a mortar the liver, bacon, and fat, and mix in all the seasoning, salt, pepper, spices, thyme, parsley, chives, and laurel leaf; cover the bottom of a mould with thin slices of bacon; put in a layer of the pâté, and then alternate layers of bacon and pâté till the mould is filled; cover with strips of lard; cook it three hours in the stove; dip the mould in hot water for a moment to remove the pâté; trim it, glaze it, and ornament it with bunches of crimped parsley, and slices of hard-boiled eggs.

Ham Toast. — Grate your cold boiled ham; season highly with mustard, salt, and plenty of cayenne pepper; add a little butter, mix well, and spread on hot toasted bread.

POULTRY.

GENERAL DIRECTIONS.

ALL poultry should be picked and drawn as soon as killed. Never buy undrawn poultry; it may be uneatable, because flavored by the foul contents of the craw and intestines. If you keep poultry, starve for twenty-four hours before killing; but even in this case pick and draw at once. Never eat poultry until at least eight hours after it has been killed; and, before stuffing it, wash out well in at least three waters, putting a pinch of soda into the last. The following receipts are available for roasting on the spit, for Dutch ovens, or for baking in the range oven.

DIRECTIONS FOR ROASTING GAME AND POULTRY (SOYER).

Hang up the poultry about ten inches from the fire; let it hang for ten minutes to set the skin; then press into a wooden spoon a piece of butter or lard dripping; when the skin is very hot, rub it over with the fat in the spoon until all is melted; then draw it back to about twelve inches. A good-sized fowl will take three quarters of an hour; chicken, twenty minutes; middle-sized game, one hour; turkey, fourteen pounds, two hours and a half; large hare, one hour and a half; if very young, three quarters of an hour. Never baste them; but, having rubbed them well with butter, dredge them carefully.

Small game should be placed nearer the fire.

Apple sauce should be served with goose; currant or grape jelly with hare; fried bread crumbs with grouse; bread sauce with partridge and pheasant.

Roast Chicken. — Clean, wash, truss, and stuff with a rich forcemeat of bread crumbs, butter, pepper, salt, etc.; fill the bodies and crops of the chickens, sew them up, and roast an hour or more, in proportion to their size, following the directions given above.

Stew the giblets and necks in just enough water to cover them; and when the fowls are removed to a hot dish, add the chopped giblets and the liquor to the gravy in the dripping-pan; boil up once, thicken with browned flour, boil again, and serve in a gravy-boat.

Boiled Chicken. — Prepare precisely as above, baste up in floured cloths, and put into a pot with enough boiling water to cover them well; stew slowly an hour or more, being guided by size and toughness; serve with egg sauce.

Spring Chicken, Broiled. — Split the chickens down the back, and broil them before the fire in a folding wirebroiler, turning them frequently; dust them with a little flour, and baste them with butter; when cooked through place them on a hot dish, rub more butter over them, and serve hot.

Fricasseed Chicken, Brown. — Cut up the chicken, fry the pieces a light brown, and put them in a stewpan with sufficient gravy, already prepared; thicken the gravy with butter and flour, and color it with burned sugar; season with mace, salt, pepper, and a glassful of burned sherry.

Fricasseed Chicken, White, No. 1. — Joint the chickens, and lay them in salt and water for one hour; then put them on to boil in a small quantity of water, with mace, pepper, and salt; add half a pint of cream or milk thickened with butter and flour rolled together; just before serving, dust with roasted powdered parsley.

Fricasseed Chicken, White, No. 2. — Make a little white gravy with veal trimmings, mace, onion, salt, and white pepper; when sufficiently done, strain the liquor from the meat, and return it to the saucepan; have the chicken cut up and place it in this gravy; stew gently until it is well cooked; then thicken the gravy with well-mixed butter and flour; beat into a gill of cream the yolks of two eggs, and pour it into the saucepan just before taking it from the fire.

Chicken and Tomatoes. — Four small chickens cut in pieces; six large tomatoes; two onions; three large green peppers, seeds and veins removed; small bunch of sweet herbs; a slice of salt pork cut into dice; three cloves; a few peppercorns; half a tumblerful of white wine, and one of water; a large piece of butter; one teacupful of rice, well washed and picked.

Put all in a stewpan, and let it cook slowly together.

Chicken Pie (Albany receipt). — A tender young chicken cut into small pieces; put it into a small pan with a little salt and a blade of mace, and cover it with water; cover closely and cook until tender; line a deep dish with puff paste, and cut some squares of paste with a jaggingiron; when the chicken is cooked, put it into the dish with the squares of paste, also a lump of butter, some pepper, and a little rich cream; add, also, the liquor in which the chicken was cooked, thickened with butter and flour; cover with paste and bake in a quick oven.

Chicken Potpie. — Make a fairly rich paste; cut it into long, broad strips, and line the pot with it, placing them like the staves of a barrel; cut a large, fine chicken into small pieces, salt and pepper it, and put it into the pot with a quarter of an onion minced fine, two potatoes sliced thinly, and some large, flat dumplings of rich paste; rub some flour and butter together, stir in some hot water, and make the mixture smooth; pour this over the chicken, and if it is not enough to cover it add a little warm milk and water; then turn the tops of the crust lining the pot over the chicken, and make a lid of crust to go over the whole; a hole in the middle of this must be left for the gravy to bubble through; the crust must be thick; when the pie is cooked, serve it on a large dish, place the chicken in the middle, and arrange the pieces which lined the pot, and ought to be well browned, on the outside, putting the softer crust and dumplings inside.

Chicken Pudding. — Four chickens; ten eggs beaten light; one quart of milk mixed with the eggs; a quarter of a pound of butter melted, with the eggs; flour enough to make a batter stirred in last of all.

Cut up the chickens in large pieces, and put them in a saucepan with salt, pepper, parsley, a stick of celery, and as little water as will cook them; let them simmer until tender; then take the chicken from the water and place it in a deep baking-dish; pour the batter over all and bake it.

Chicken Pillau. — One chicken; one teacupful of rice, well washed and soaked for an hour; pepper and salt to taste; one blade of mace.

Cut up the chicken as for fricassee; let it simmer slowly with just enough water to cover it; when it has cooked for twenty minutes add the seasoning; allow it to cook a little longer, or until quite tender; then take it off the fire, drain the rice, and put it in the pot with about a pint of the liquor in which the chicken was boiled; salt it, and let it boil till nearly done; then drain off most of the liquor, put the chicken into the middle of the rice, and stew gently.

Florida Pillau. — One fat chicken cut up in small pieces; one onion; one clove of garlic; five tomatoes; one piece of pork.

Fry all the above ingredients lightly in butter; then put into a pot a pint of rice, water enough to cover it, a little salt, pepper, and allspice, the chicken, pork, and vegetables, and cook all slowly together; when the rice is sufficiently cooked, put the pot on one side of the fire to simmer gently until it is time to serve it.

Baked Pillau. — Two boiled fowls cut up in small pieces. Reserve a part of the water in which the fowls have been cooked in which to boil the rice, keeping the rest to add afterwards; when the rice is done mix it with butter, lay one half in the bottom of a deep dish, lay the fowls upon it, and put the other half of the rice on top, adding the remainder of the liquor; then spread over all the well-beateu yolks of two eggs, and bake it in a moderate oven.

Pressed Chicken. — Put a fowl into a porcelain-lined kettle with salt, a few whole cloves and whole allspice, but no water; cook two hours or more à bain-marie; then remove the skin and bones, chop the dark and light meat together, and place them in a dish; pour over it the strained liquor which remained in the kettle; let it cool, then fold it tightly in a cloth, and press with a heavy weight; slice and serve cold.

Fried Chicken. — Cut the chickens in pieces, and season them with pepper and salt and a dust of meal; then fry them in butter, lay them on paper, and cover them to keep them warm; then pour the grease out of the frying-pan, and put into it a teacupful of cream, a blade of mace, a little salt and pepper, a saltspoonful of flour, and a teaspoonful of butter mixed together; let these simmer together a few minutes; place the chicken on a hot dish, and pour the sauce over it.

Chicken Pie. — Cut one or two chickens in small pieces; put them in a saucepan with a little water, pepper, salt, a blade of mace, and a stick of celery; cover closely, and let the chicken simmer slowly, turning it often; when nearly cooked take the chicken out of the water; ski in the water, and stir in a thickening of flour mixed well with butter; let it thicken over the fire a short time. In the meanwhile line a deep baking-dish with rich puff paste; place the chicken in it, together with some hard-boiled eggs cut in slices, and the giblets; add the liquor from the saucepan, cover the dish with paste, and bake just long enough to bake the crust.

Chicken Breasts (Florentine fashion). — Take the breasts of several chickens together with the white meat; prepare the breasts by trimming each one into the shape of a cutlet; then make a mince of chicken breasts, the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs, and some finely rolled bread crumbs; pound this mince to a paste in the mortar, and then press it through a colander; add enough rich, fresh cream to bind all together; flavor with a tiny pinch of nutmeg, a coffeespoonful of roasted powdered parsley, and two drops of essence of celery, salt and pepper to taste; then with a broad-bladed silver or wooden knife spread the mince smoothly, thickly, and evenly upon the chicken breasts; it should be fully half an inch thick. Have ready equal quantities of tongue and ham cut into tiny rounds and lozenges; dot the chicken breasts with these; arrange the chicken breasts in a large stewpan, so disposing them as to leave a small space between each one; put in a liberal lump of fresh butter, and stew over a slow fire for an hour; when the butter has been absorbed add enough broth to keep the chicken breasts from burning. This is fl favorite dish all through Italy, where it is possible to buy the breasts of a chicken in market without buying the whole chicken. I can vouch for the dish as being a delicious and pretty entrée.

Stewed Chicken with White Stuffing. — Pick, draw, and wash the chicken in three waters, adding a little soda to the last but one. Prepare the stuffing as follows: Boil a quart of good milk with two sticks of celery, a little thyme, laurel, basil, and coriander seeds until it is reduced to one half; strain, and add two ounces of bread crumbs; replace the casserole on the fire, and keep it there until the milk has absorbed all the bread; then remove it from the fire, add more bread crumbs, salt and pepper to taste, twelve almonds blanched and powdered to a paste, a pinch of nutmeg, and the yolks of five hard-boiled eggs; mix well and smoothly together; then stuff the chicken, sew it up, cover it closely and carefully with sliced ham, and stew in milk until tender; serve with a white sauce.

Capon with Truffles. — When the capon is picked, singed, drawn, and cleaned ready for roasting, peel and scrape clean some truffles, and scald them in boiling melted butter, with a little pepper and salt; fill the capon entirely with the truffles so prepared; sew up the opening, and envelope the capon carefully and thoroughly in white paper, buttered, and put it in a cool, dry place, for two days or less, if the weather be warm; then roast it in freshly buttered paper. When the capon is nearly cooked the paper should be removed, and the capon basted with butter until it assumes a fine brown color.

Capon with Malaga Wine. — Prepare a capon as above, substituting, however, a simple ordinary stuffing for the truffles. When the two days have expired, put the capon in a casserole with some fried onions and ham; add half a bottlef ul of Malaga wine, cover the top of the casserole with buttered paper, and again with a casserole, cover; cook the capon over a slow fire, and serve it with the sauce in which it has been cooked, which should be strained to free it from grease, and thickened either with browned bread crumbs or with pounded chestnuts. A handful of finely sliced truffles is a great improvement to this sauce.

Capon à la Crême. — Take a roasted capon and remove the breast, which pound to a pulp in a mortar; add to this some bread crumbs which have been boiled in milk until quite soft, and which should be smoothly mixed with the capon breast; add also about half a pound of beef suet, some cold ham finely minced, a small shallot, some grated parsley, the yolks of four hard-boiled eggs, two truffles sliced finely, and salt and pepper to taste; add enough good fresh cream to bind' all together; stuff the capon with this, and re-form the breasts, glazing the capon with beaten white of eggs, and covering it thickly with lightly browned bread crumbs; then place the capon in a covered casserole, enveloping it with thin slices of ham. It should cook until thoroughly heated through and through. Then place on a very hot dish and serve.

Roast Duck Stuffed with Celery. — Clean, wash, and wipe the ducks very carefully. To the usual dressing add one half the quantity of stewed celery, and a minced shallot. Stuff and sew up as usual, reserving the giblets for the gravy. If tender, the ducks will not require more than an hour to roast. They should be well basted. Skim the gravy before putting in the giblets and thickening. The giblets should be stewed in a very little water, then chopped fine, and added to the gravy in the dripping-pan, with a chopped shallot, and a spoonful of brown flour. Accompany with currant or grape jelly.

Salted Ducks (Italian monastery). — The ducks should be drawn as soon as possible after being killed, the inside thoroughly washed through four waters, third wash being given with soda water, the last with fresh cold water. They should then be picked, singed, and hung up for two days. The legs, wings, breast, and the fleshy part of the stomach should then be neatly cut off, thoroughly covered with salt, and placed in an earthenware vessel, taking care to exclude the air by a thick layer of salt. Let them remain thus for fifteen days, then rinse in cold water, afterwards in vinegar, then stick the pieces of duck rather thickly with cloves; sprinkle them with celery seed and sweet herbs, among which should be some laurel leaves; a very little nitre should also be sprinkled over them in order to give the flesh a bright red color. They should then be placed in jars, and covered with brine. On top of the brine pour olive-oil. The oil should be about an inch deep.

Roast Goose. — Clean and wash the goose, putting a teaspoonful of soda into the last water but one; stuff with bread crumbs, salt, pepper, a tablespoonful of melted butter, a large onion chopped fine, a large roast apple ditto, a tablespoonful of chopped sage, the yolks of two eggs, and some tiny dice of fat pork; stuff body and craw, and sew up. If the fire be clear and fierce, and the goose a large one, it will take fully two hours to roast. Cover the breast until half done with buttered paper, or a paste of flour and water, removing this when yon are ready to brown; make a gravy as for roast duck, adding a glassful of old port, if possible, and send to the table with apple sauce.

Roast Guinea Fowls. — Pick, clean, wash, and stuff as you would chickens, adding to the stuffing a little minced ham. Roast as you would chickens, basting liberally with butter. Season the gravy with a chopped shallot, and with summer savory; add the giblets, and thicken with browned flour.

Goose Pie. — An old goose stewed for five hours or more; a smoked beef's tongue parboiled; six hard-boiled eggs.

Put on the goose in just cold water enough to cover it, and stew slowly and steadily, adding water, if needed, from the boiling kettle; when cooked, cut all the meat from the bones; lay the bones and skin aside, chop the giblets; line a deep pudding-dish with good paste, lay in the pieces of goose, the chopped giblets, the sliced tongue and egg, in consecutive layers; intersperse with strips of paste, season with pepper, salt, and bits of butter, and proceed in this order until the dish is full; add the gravy in which the goose was stewed, thickened with browned flour; cover with thick paste,and brush the top with beaten white of egg.

Roast Pigeons. — Pick, draw, clean, and stuff as you would chickens; lay them in rows, with a little water poured into the pan, to prevent their scorching. Unless they are very fat, baste with butter until they are half done, then with their own gravy. When cooked, thicken the gravy that drips from them, and boil up once, then pour into the gravy-boat.

Broiled Pigeons or Squabs. — Pick, clean, wash, and dry caref ully with a clean cloth; then split down the back, and broil like chickens; season with pepper and salt, and butter liberally while dishing them.

Pigeon Pie. — Clean, wash, truss, and stuff them; loosen the joints with a knife, parboil them for ten minutes while you prepare a puff paste; line a deep dish with this,put in the bottom some shreds of lean ham, them some hardboiled eggs, sliced, buttered, and peppered, then the birds sprinkled with pepper and minced parsley; squeeze some lemon juice upon them, and lay upon the breast pieces of butter rolled in flour; cover with slices of eggs, then with shred ham; pour in some of the gravy in which the pigeons were parboiled, and cover with paste, leaving a hole in the lid; bake an hour. This pie is best made of wild pigeons.

Boned Pigeons. — Take four good-sized pigeons; draw, wash, and bone them, then fill with the following stuffing: One quarter of a pound of ham, one quarter of a pound of tongue, one half pound of chicken breast, or the white meat of a chicken, two ounces of truffles, the yolk of two eggs, some bread crumb soaked in beef broth, a few drops of essence of celery, ateaspoonf ul of roasted powdered parsley, the grated rind of one quarter of a lemon, and a pinch of nutmeg; salt and pepper to taste; chop all the ingredients finely, then mix well together and press through a colander; stuff the pigeons as full as possible; bind them firmly and securely with clean twine, and arrange them side by side in a stewpan, putting in a liberal lump of butter; cover the stewpan closely, and let them cook over a slow fire for an hour. The cook should uncover the casserole from time to time, in order to see when the butter is absorbed, at which point some good broth should be added, in order to prevent the pigeons from burning. Serve cold. (Excellent.)

Stewed Duck. — Clean and divide as for fricassee. Put into a saucepan with several slices of lean cold ham or salt pork, minced fine, and stew slowly, closely covered, for an hour; then stir in a large chopped onion, half a teaspoonful of powdered sage, as much parsley, a tablespoonf ul of catsup, and black pepper; stew until tender, then add a teaspoonfulof brown sugar, and a tablespoonf ul of browned flour, mixed with cold water; boil up once, and serve in a deep covered dish, with green pease as an accompaniment.

Stewed Pigeons. — Pick, draw, clean, and stuff as for roasting. Put the pigeons into a deep pot with enough cold water to cover them, and stew gently for half an hour; then put in a little ham cut into strips, and stew until, testing with a fork, you find them tender; then season with pepper, salt, a few blades of mace, a little sweet marjoram, and a good piece of butter; let them simmer for five minutes longer, then stir in a teaspoonful of browned flour; let it boil up once, then take out the pigeons, remove the strings, and put into a deep dish, pouring the hot gravy over them.

Roast Turkey. — The turkey should be young and plump. It should be roasted on the spit, or before the fire in a roaster, and frequently basted. The body and craw should be stuffed with bread stuffing, or with equal quantities of boiled chestnuts and ham, chopped fine, and duly seasoned with butter, pepper, and salt, or with a bread stuffing mixed with lightly fried and finely chopped sausages. It should be basted frequently. The gravy must be made in a saucepan, from the drippings in the roaster, carefully skimming the fat. Chop up the liver as finely as possible, and add it to the gravy. The time required for cooking must depend upon the size of the bird; serve on a hot dish, with a wreath of water-cresses round it. Cranberry sauce or jelly should always accompany roast turkey.

Roast Turkey with Plum-Pudding Stuffing. — Prepare for roasting as above, and make a stuffing with bread crumbs, butter, salt, pepper, and an egg well beaten ; also a teacupful of large Malaga or Sultana raisins, carefully seeded; mix well,but do not wet the dressing; stuff the craw first, and sew it up; then stuff the body of the turkey, leaving room for the raisins to swell. Roast as above directed. If the turkey is to be eaten cold, take out the dressing, moisten it with a little gravy, and serve it alone, very hot.

Wild Turkey should always be prepared with a chestnut stuffing, to which add much butter, as wild turkey is apt to be dry; roast and baste as for domestic turkey, allowing one pound of good butter for basting a large wild turkey.

Braised Turkey. — Truss a large turkey as for boiling; stuff it with chestnuts, rolled bread crumbs, finely minced ham, and two or three truffles; add sweet herbs and onion to taste, and a little butter, as otherwise the dressing is apt to be too dry; lard the breast of the turkey very delicately; line the bottom of a braising-pan with slices of bacon and ham; lay the turkey on these, and place more slices of bacon and ham on the top of it; put in two carrots and two onions cut in slices, and sweet herbs, parsley, bay leaf, a clove of garlic, and whole pepper; salt to taste, and moisten with some good strong stock and a tumblerful of sherry; lay a round of buttered paper on top, put on the lid, and braise with a moderate tire under and over for four hours; serve with the gravy strained, and freed from excess of fat.

Pressed Turkey in Jelly. — Take a large, tender turkey; make a stuffing of bread crumbs, chopped pork fat, a minced onion, pepper, and salt; stuff the craw and inside of the turkey as full as possible, and sew them up; put it in a pot just large enough to hold it, with one pound of lean beef, shredded fine,two calves'feet, and salt to taste; let it simmer slowly for several hours, keeping the lid of the pot on, and adding boiling water, if the turkey should not continue covered; when the turkey appears thoroughly cooked, take it off the fire, and put it away to cool; let the stock cook until the meat falls from the bones of the calves' feet; then set it away to cool; in the morning remove the fat, and put it (the stock) on the fire, in a kettle perfectly free from grease; if the stock be not firmly jellied, add enough gelatine to stiffen it; add also salt to taste, a tablespoonful of sugar, a blade of mace, and the whites of two or three eggs to clear it; if the jelly is too light in color, add a little caramel coloring, and a few drops of lemon juice. Cut the turkey into small pieces, about two inches long; have ready some cold smoked tongue or ham, minced fine,and mix this evenly with the stuffing; then pack the turkey in alternate layers of turkey and stuffing, in a tall, wide stone pot; when all is in, pour the hot jelly slowly over it, allowing it to run well through the whole; put the pot in a very cold place, and take out the turkey when needed, after the jelly has become hard; serve with capers or tiny pickled peppers.

Turkey alla Triestina. — Prepare the turkey as for roasting, and put it into a saucepan with some pieces of fat bacon, an onion, sliced, a carrot, and some celery, all chopped fine; add also two calves' feet, a piece of butter, and the liver, etc., of the turkey; let all fry until of a light brown color, then pour in enough broth to almost cover the turkey, and a liqueurglassful of the very finest old brandy; cover the casserole hermetically, and let it cook over a slow fire until done; then serve in the sauce in which it has been cooked, which should be strained to free it from fat. A tablespoonful of tomato catsup is a great improvement to this sauce. It should be added just before sending it to table.

Jellied Turkey. — Take a large, fine turkey, pick, singe, draw, and clean it; lard it with ham; then wrap it completely in thin slices of bacon and veal, and sprinkle over it a little fried onion chopped fine, and several pieces of lemon freed from rind and seed; place it in a casserole and pour in enough bouillon and white wine to almost cover it in the proportion of two thirds bouillon to one third white wine; cover the casserole hermetically, if possible, and cook over a slow fire for four hours; then put the turkey on a dish and proceed to strain the broth in which it has cooked. If the broth should not be thick enough to jelly, return it to the fire for a few minutes; in order to clear it throw in the beaten white of an egg while the broth is cooling; then replace it on the fire, allow it to boil up once or twice, and strain it through a cloth; when it begins to cool pour it slowly and carefully over the turkey, taking care to do this so evenly that the turkey may be thoroughly encased in the jelly; serve cold, garnishing with crisp lettuce leaves and celery.

Roast Duck with Olives. — Prepare the duck as for roasting, and fill it completely with large Spanish olives carefully stoned; then sew up the opening, put the duck on the spit, or in the oven, and roast as usual. If tender, the duck will not require more than an hour to roast It should be well basted. Roast duck with olives is generally best cold.

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Boiled Turkey. — Stuff with a bread stuffing in the body and craw; tie the legs and wings close to the body before putting it into the pot; when the flesh begins to crack open about the legs it will be cooked enough; serve with a rich oyster or equally rich celery sauce.

Imitation Boned Turkey. — Take a large, fine turkey; stuff the inside and craw with a rich forcemeat; take care to bind the legs and wings so tightly to the body as almost to imbed them in it, making the outside as nearly as possible a plain surface; simmer it gently until tender, in as little water as will cook it, turning it often; have prepared a rich meat jelly, clear and well flavored; place the turkey, breast downwards, in a deep oval vessel, and pour the jelly over it; set it in a cold place; when quite cold, set the vessel an instant in hot water to turn out the jelly, then dish; place some fragments of jelly on the top, with a sprig of curled parsley.

Boned Turkey. — Cut off the neck and claws, remove the drumsticks, and leave the wings, which must be carefully boned; then put the turkey on a clean cloth, cut open the back, and very carefully remove all the bones, taking care also not to spoil or gash the skin; then, with a larding needle, carefully hard the breast of the turkey and whatever other part admits of larding; make a stuffing of veal, fillet of beef, fat pork chopped into small dice, bread crumbs rolled fine and mixed with savory herbs, salt and pepper to taste, small triangular bits of cold tongue, a few truffles sliced fine, and yolks of two or three hard-boiled eggs cut into thick slices; fill the interior of the turkey with alternate layers of this stuffing and the thinnest possible slices of cold veal and lean ham; when stuffed sew up the aperture carefully, and rub the turkey over with lemon juice; do this thoroughly, and then envelop the turkey in thin slices of ham; sew it up afterwards in a clean muslin cloth, which should previously have been dipped in sherry wine; cook it for three hours, proceeding as for turkey alia Triestina; when quite cold remove the cloth, and serve the turkey in the jelly in which it was cooked. This jelly should be clarified.

Devilled Turkey. — Take a cooked leg of turkey; slash it to the bone; salt and pepper it well, using both black and cayenne; mix some made mustard with flour, and plaster it over the leg; place it on a gridiron, and boil over a clear fire.

Scalloped Turkey. — Butter a deep dish, line it with bread crumbs, and put in the bottom a layer of bread crumbs seasoned with butter, pepper, and salt, then a layer of cold turkey chopped fine, and so on until the dish is full, adding the stuffing and gravy of the turkey; then beat together two eggs, add to them two tablespoonfuls of milk, butter, salt, pepper, and rolled cracker crumbs; spread thickly over the top of the turkey; bake half an hour, keeping it covered for twenty minutes, then remove the cover, and brown.

GAME.

See "General Directions " for Poultry, page 140.

To Preserve Game Untainted. — Draw; rinse thoroughly with soda and water, then with pure cold water; wipe dry; put in the cavity of each bird a piece of charcoal, and rub the birds lightly with fine salt and a very little black pepper. Hang in a cool, dark place with a clean cloth thrown over them.

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Reed or Ortolans. — Pluck, but do not draw, these birds; cover them with strips of lard, and roast on skewers.

Gras Grasses. — These little birds infest the pricklyash trees in July and August, in the Southern States, and are killed by scores with mustard-seed shot; and are so fat that they often burst in falling to the ground. Pluck, but never draw them; wrap each one in a vine leaf and roast on skewers.

Cattle de Laurier. — These birds are considered the greatest delicacy in the South, where they fatten on the seed of the magnolia. Pluck and draw your birds, put a magnolia seed in each one, and roast on skewers. Cut slices of bread the same size, toast carefully, and place them in the dripping-pan under the birds. They require only twenty minutes to cook. Serve each bird on a slice of the toasted bread.

Wild Ducks (stewed). — Clean, draw, wash, wipe; put in a raw carrot or onion, and boil ten minutes. Then lay in very cold water half an hour; then cut up, pepper, salt, flour them, and fry to a light brown; put them in a saucepan and cover with a gravy made of the giblets, necks, and some bits of lean veal; add a minced shallot, a bunch of sweet herbs, salt, and pepper; cover closely and stew until tender; take out the duck, skim and strain the gravy, return to the fire, and put in a cup of rich cream in which an egg has been beaten, thicken with browned flour, add a tablespoonful of wine and the juice of half a lemon, beaten in gradually, boil up, and pour over the ducks.

Wild-Pigeon Pie. — Make this precisely as you make quail pie, except that the pigeons are cut up and are not stuffed. The gravy should be much richer, made with strong stock and thickened by a lump of butter rolled in browned flour.

Wild Ducks (roasted). — Prepare as you prepare other game, and roast for half or three quarters of an hour, according to size.

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Canvas-back Duck's. — Canvas-back ducks must be roasted quickly, before a brisk fire, to keep the juices from flowing out; from fifteen to thirty minutes is the range allowed to suit different tastes. They should never be stuffed or dressed in any way; and are always eaten very much underdone, so that a rich, high-colored blood will follow the knife.

Squabs in Olives. — Clean them nicely and lay them in salt and water; take a quarter of a pound of butter, a quarter of an onion, three tablespoonfuls of flour, and a little mace, cloves, pepper, and salt, and stew all together for half an hour; then add the squabs, the olives stoned, and let all stew slowly for an hour longer.

Roast Wild Ducks. — Pluck and draw the duck; put in a little salt and two sage leaves. This imparts a delicious flavor. Roast on a spit, and baste with melted butter.

Teal Ducks. — These are best broiled. Pluck, draw, and split down the back; sprinkle with a little salt and pepper; broil over a quick fire, and serve with a little melted butter in which you have chopped parsley and a little lemon juice; pour this over at the last moment.

Duck with Olives. — Pluck and draw your duck; cook it in a saucepan with half butter and lard; pour this out; make a roux with a spoonful of flour and some fresh butter; add some bouillon, salt, pepper, and a soup bunch; return your duck, and when it is nearly done throw in some olives which you have stoned; let them cook five minutes; serve your duck surrounded by the olives; skim the sauce, and serve in a sauce-boat.

Broiled Game. — Clean, wash, and split down the back; lay in cold water half an hour; wipe carefully; season with salt and pepper, and broil on a buttered gridiron over a clear, fierce fire; when done lay in a hot dish, butter both sides well, and serve at once.

Salmi of Game, No. 1. — Put together for gravy all the dressing, skin, and odds and ends of your cold game; put into a saucepan with a slice of ham, a minced shallot, and a bunch of sweet herbs; pour on a pint of strong broth, and stew, closely covered, for almost an hour; then skim and strain, return to the fire, thicken with browned flour, add a soupcon of nutmeg, a little lemon juice, and a wineglassful of burned sherry. Meanwhile the game must have been neatly cut up, and placed in another saucepan to heat; pour over the sauce, heat smoking hot, dish, and

Salmi, No. 2 (Gouge). — Bone the game and chop the meat fine; then pound it in a mortar to a paste; when pounded to 'a smooth paste, moisten with a little bouillon; when it is quite smooth, press the paste through a sieve. Meanwhile, heat in a casserole 'a little butter, the pieces of skin, dressing, the bones, etc., of the game; add a little strong broth, a tablespoonful of good red wine, two shallots, and a bunch of sweet herbs; thicken with browned flour; when it has cooked half an hour add two teaspoonfuls of olive-oil and the juice of a lemon; boil up once, then strain; meanwhile heat the paste; when thoroughly heated place the paste on croutons of fried bread, garnish with slices of lemon, pour over the sauce, and serve. If this salmi should be made of partridge, it may be garnished in December with slices of bitter orange.

Salmi, Cold, of Goose or Duck. — This salmi should be prepared at table. Carve the bird nicely; rub the liver and lights to a smooth paste; add the cold gravy, two or three spoonfuls of olive-oil, the juice of a lemon, salt and pepper to taste; work to a smooth dressing of the consistency of mayonnaise, and serve with the cold game.

Chaudfroid (Cuisiniere Parisienne). — Cut up the cold game very carefully; arrange it with equal care on a large, round dish, building up the cold game into a pyramid; pour over all a rich sauce, which will jelly when cold. Aspic jelly, or clarified calves'-foot jelly, flavored with strong stock, are best for this. Garnish, when cold, with sliced lemon, curled lettuce, etc.

Salmi Glace (or sauce chaudfroid). — Make a good sauce veloute; strain free from grease, and add a third of the quantity of aspic jelly; put on the fire and boil until it thickens; then remove the saucepan from the fire, stir in the yolks of three eggs well beaten, strain, and set away to cool; when cool, and before it forms, spread it careful]y over your pieces of cold game, being careful to cover or ice them completely; when cold arrange in a dish, and garnish with pickled mushrooms.

Game Pie. — It is well to make this of different kinds of game. Clean and wash the birds, cutting the smaller ones in half, the larger into four pieces; trim off the inferior portions of the birds, and put them into the saucepan with the giblets, and a pint and a half of broth for six birds. While this is stewing, make a good puff paste and line a large pudding-dish, reserving enough for a lid fully half an inch thick; lard the breasts of the birds with tiny bits of salt pork, and make a forcemeat of the cooked livers, a couple of slices of pork, a bunch of parsley, sweet marjoram and thyme, the juice of a lemon, and a tiny shallot; pepper and mix with rolled bread crumbs moistened with milk; put some thin strips of cold corned ham in the bottom of the pie, then some pieces of bird well buttered, then a layer of forcemeat, and so on until the dish is full; then strain the gravy, return to the fire, pepper, and add a glassful of wine; pour boiling hot into the pie; put on the lid — cutting a hole in the middle — and bake three hours.

Jugged Hare. — Cut the hare in pieces and lay in a stone jar; grate a Spanish onion; have ready a muslin bag with all kinds of seasoning — hot peppers, sage, thyme, and round peppers; put all the blood in a pint-and-a-half basin, fill up with water, and mix as much flour with this as will make it the thickness of good cream; put all into the jar, adding Worcestershire sauce and salt, a wineglassf ul of port wine, a heaping tablespoonful of currant jelly, and half a lemon sliced fine; put a plate on the mouth of the jar, and tie tightly down ; cook three hours d bain-marie.

Roast Ortolans (Brillat Savarin). — The art of knowing how to roast ortolans consists in the fact they must never be approached by salt; this destroys their peculiarly delicate flavor. When they are picked, drawn, and cleaned — ready for roasting — they should be filled with fresh, unsalted butter; they should then be tied in small, thick slices of light, white bread (unsalted bread is best), and so arranged on the spit, roasting over a clear, though slow, fire. The cook should baste them continually with a little fresh butter, and later with their own dripping; a few moments before serving the bread should be untied and placed in the dripping-pan, and the ortolans basted until they assume a delicate brown color; they should be served with the bread in which they have been roasted.

Partridge Pie. — Line a deep dish with puff paste; put a layer of thin slices of ham at the bottom of the dish, and on this a layer of veal, chopped finely and passed through a sieve; then cut up four partridges; season them lightly with salt, pepper, a little chopped parsley, and thyme; pour in a pint of very good gravy; cover with puff paste, and bake an hour; glaze the upper crust with white of egg

Roast Partridge. — Clean, truss, and stuff as you do chickens; roast at a hot fire, and baste with butter and water until brown; sprinkle with salt; dredge lightly, at the last, with flour to froth the birds, and serve hot; thicken the gravy in the dripping-pan with browned flour, boil up once, and serve in a boat. Cream sauce, No. 2, is delicious with roast partridge.

Broiled Partridge. — Clean, wash, and split down the back; lay in cold water half an hour; wipe carefully, season with salt and pepper, and broil on a buttered gridiron over a clear fire; when done, lay on a hot dish, butter both sides well, and serve at once.

Louis's Perdrix aux Choux. — Cut two partridges in quarters; put them in a saucepan with a little lard, slices of ham, and sausage; let them cook half done; blanch a fine, white-head cabbage in boiling salt and water; drain and split in half; cut out the heart of the cabbage, and stuff the cabbage with the partridge, ham, and sausage; tie it up tightly together; line the bottom of a saucepan with slices of onions and strips of breakfast bacon or ham; put your cabbage on this; cover your saucepan closely, and cook over a gentle fire till done; remove the strings from the cabbage; serve with the sauce in which it has cooked poured over it.'

Partridge with Chestnuts. — Pluck, draw, and singe your bird over a quick blaze; lard it with fine strips of lard, seasoned with salt and pepper; put it in a saucepan with a soup-bunch, strips of lard, a glassful of white wine, a glassful of good bouillon and salt, and a little pepper; cook slowly and take your bird out of the saucepan when done; strain your gravy; have ready fifty good boiled chestnuts, peeled; pound them in a mortar, moisten them with the gravy, pass them through a colander, serve your bird on the puree, always surrounded by fried croutons.

Snipe en Salmis. — Cut up any cold roast snipe; put them in a saucepan with the livers and entrails well chopped; add chopped eschalots, a glassful of white wine, salt, and pepper; let it boil a few minutes, take out the pieces of bird, lay them on toasted slices of bread on a dish, and pour the gravy over them and serve.

Grilled Partridge. — Draw, clean, and wash the partridge; wipe dry, and split and arrange for broiling; put it into a deep dish which has been well rubbed with garlic; sprinkle with salt and pepper, a little chopped parsley, a leaf or two of laurel, and some very fine oliveoil; leave it there (the dish being well covered) for two or three hours; then broil on a buttered gridiron over a clear fire, turning often; serve on a very hot dish, squeeze a little lemon juice over it, surround with a wreath of water-cresses, dotted with slices of lemon.

Partridge Breaded and Broiled. — Prepare as above, dip in beaten egg, then in rolled bread crumbs; broil as above, and serve with saucepoivrade.

Partridge or other Cold Game in Mayonnaise. — Cut up the cold game nicely, and place on a bed of mayonnaise sauce; pour over some more mayonnaise, so as to cover the game completely; garnish with olives, truffles, pickled beets, curled lettuce, etc.

Cold lamb is also very good so treated.

Partridge or other Game with a Puree of Green Pease. — Stew the partridge and serve on a puree of green pease.

Quail Pie. — Clean, truss, and stuff the birds, and loosen the joints without entirely separating them; parboil them for ten minutes, meanwhile lining a deep dish with good puff paste; put in the bottom some shreds of salt pork or ham; next, a layer of hard-boiled eggs, buttered and peppered; then the birds, sprinkled with pepper and minced parsley; squeeze some lemon juice upon them, and lay on them pieces of butter rolled in flour; cover with slices of egg, then with shredded ham; pour in some of the gravy in which the quail were boiled, and put on the lid, leaving a hole in the middle; bake over an hour.

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Roast Pheasant a le Brillat Savarin. — Let your bird hang unpicked until the odor determines its proper condition for cooking. Pick and draw it; lard it carefully with fine, firm strips of lard; take two snipe, bone and draw them; take the meat, make a stuffing with beef marrow, a little fat meat, salt and pepper, and enough truffles chopped fine to fill the pheasant; stuff your bird, and be careful to cover the opening with a crust of bread and tie it with a thread to keep it in place; then take the entrails and livers of the snipe (throwing away the gizzards), pound them with two large truffles, an anchovy, a little fat meat, and fresh butter; prepare" a slice of bread large enough to extend two inches beyond the bird; spread this paste evenly on the bread, which you place in the dripping-pan, under the bird, on the spit, and which receives all the drippings from the bird; when the pheasant is cooked, serve it on the slice of bread, surround it with slices of sour orange, and pour over it a wineglassful of good Burgundy.

Roast Pheasant, English Style. — When your bird has hung long enough, pluck, draw it, and envelop it in a strong, buttered paper and put it on the spit; in half an hour remove the paper, to let it brown, and watch it carefully to know when it is done; baste it with melted butter, in which you have poured a spoonful of good Madeira; cut and trim eight little slices of bread the same size; place them in the dripping-pan; serve your bird on a dish surrounded by these and alternate slices of lemon. It will require three quarters of an hour to cook the pheasant.

Roast Pheasants. — When the pheasant is prepared for roasting it should be carefully larded and stuffed with bread crumbs, butter, a little ham minced fine, and some boiled chestnuts, cut into quarters; add also a little powdered parsley; then fold the pheasant in white paper carefully buttered, put it on the spit or in the oven, and, when almost cooked, remove the paper and brown the pheasant carefully; serve with bread or cream sauce.

Pheasant Stewed in Malaga Wine. — Lard the pheasant with ham, and stuff it with fillet of beef and boiled chestnuts in equal proportions, adding also some butter and chicken liver; salt to taste; then put the pheasant in a stewpan with a few onions fried in butter, some slices of lean ham, and enough stock to almost cover it; when about half cooked add a glassful of Malaga wine ; serve with the sauce in which it has been cooked, which should be strained to free it from fat, and thickened with some pounded boiled chestnuts. Truffles may be added with advantage.

Roast Prairie Chicken. — Clean and truss your birds; lard one, and cover the other with strips of lard; put a cherry or peach leaf in each bird, to improve the flavor; roast on a spit.

Chipolata of Prairie Chickens. — Cut some fat pork in dice, and fry it till it begins to color; set it aside; make a roux, cut your bird in quarters, and put it in the roux with some bouillon, or water and white wine, mushrooms, the fried fat pork, and eschalottes (which have been fried in butter); take some sausages, divide each link in three by tying with a thread, heat them through on the gridiron, untie the thread, and remove the skin; add to this some roasted chestnuts and a soup bunch; cook all together; skim, remove the soup bunch, and serve on a dish surrounded by fried croutons.

Broiled Quail or Woodcock. — Split down the back, and broil over a clear fire; butter and salt when well done, and let them lie between hot plates before sending them to table.

Small snipe or other birds are nice cooked in this way.

Quails, Ortolans, Sora, Reed Birds or Mail are good broiled or roasted. In Virginia the cooks usually roll an oyster in melted butter, then in pepper and salt, and put it into each bird before roasting, and baste with butter and water three times, and then with melted butter. They take usually twelve minutes to cook, and are served on toast prepared as above.

Roast Quails Larded. — Clean and draw the quails, and lard the breasts carefully with thin strips of fat pork; stuff with a rich forcemeat of bread crumbs prepared as for grouse; sew up, truss, and roast on the spit or in the oven, basting with butter and water, and then with butter. Quails cooked in this way are delicious hot or cold.

Stewed Hare or Rabbit a la Minute (Cuisiniere Part. sienne). — Skin, clean, wash, and wipe a young hare; cut into pieces and put into a pot with a little butter, salt, and spices to taste; stew to a fine brown, add mushrooms, shallots, parsley, all chopped fine, also a teaspoonful of flour; moisten with white wine and a little broth; when it begins to boil withdraw from the fire, dish, and serve.

Fried Rabbit. — Cut into joints, soak for an hour in salt water, dry, roll in beaten egg, then in bread crumbs, and fry in hot lard or drippings to a fine brown.

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Rabbits or Hares en Papillotes (CuisiniereParisienne). — Take tender young hares or rabbits, skin, clean, wash, and, after cutting into small pieces, lay in salt water twenty minutes; then wipe dry, and put into a deep dish with a little chopped parsley, chives, mushrooms, and a tiny clove of garlic; add, also, pepper and olive-oil; leave the rabbits several hours in this savory bath; then wrap each piece in a slice of ham,adding,also, the seasoning; fold up carefully in buttered white paper, cook on a gridiron over a slow fire, and serve in the paper.

Rabbit Pie. — Cut a pair of rabbits into small pieces, and soak in salted water half an hour, and then stew until half done; cut a quarter of a pound of fat pork into strips, and boil four eggs hard ; lay some bits of pork in a hot dish, and upon these a layer of rabbit; upon this spread slices of bard-boiled eggs, peppered and buttered; sprinkle with a little powdered mace, and squeeze a few drops of lemon juice upon each piece of meat; proceed in this order until the dish is full, the last layer being pork; pour in the gravy in which the rabbits were cooked; cover with puff paste, cut a slit in the middle, and bake one hour, laying paper over the top lest it brown too fast.

Barbecued Rabbit (Daddy Jim's). — Take fat and tender rabbits; skin, clean, split open, and cut off the heads; then lay in salted water for three quarters of an hour, perhaps a little less; wipe dry very carefully, gash the backbone across and across, then broil on a buttered gridiron over a clear, fierce fire, turning the rabbit often; when brown and tender lay on a very hot dish, pepper and salt, and then butter profusely, turning the rabbit over and over to soak up the butter; cover, and set in the oven for five minutes, while you heat two tablespoonfuls of vinegar, seasoned with one of made mustard; moisten the hot rabbit well with this, cover, and send to table garnished with crisped parsley and slices of lemon.

Ragout of Rabbit (Daddy Jim's). — Skin, clean, and cut up a fine, large rabbit; put four ounces of fresh butter and six ounces of fat pork in a saucepan; let it heat through, and stir in two large spoonfuls of flour; add your pieces of rabbit; pour in a bottle of red wine; add spices, pepper, a soup bunch, bay leaf, sweet basil, an onion with a clove stuck in it; no salt for the moment; cook slowly for an hour and a quarter; stir it from time to time to keep it from sticking to the saucepan; take a pint of little white onions, cook them in butter a few moments till they begin to color; moisten them with a little bouillon; add a little dash of sugar to glaze them, and set them aside to serve around your ragout; while your rabbit is cooking, peel and slice a quart of field mushrooms, and when the rabbit is nearly done add these to the ragont; take out the onion and soup bunch; taste to see if it is seasoned enough; dress your rabbit on a dish, pour over it the sauce, and garnish your dish with the glazed onions.

Our old Daddy Jim believed in stirring in at the last moment the rabbit's blood with little pieces of butter; add this and stir continually, and it gives the gravy more consistency.

Broiled Rabbit. — Skin and clean your rabbit; split it lengthwise; flatten it with the rolling-pin; wrap it in a buttered paper and broil it on the gridiron; when it is done remove the paper, and serve it with anchovy butter.

Catahoula Rabbit Stew. — Skin, clean, and cut up your rabbit; chop up half a pound of ham; put it in a fryingpan with two sliced onions, half a clove of garlic, mashed, salt and pepper; add your rabbit; cook twenty minutes over a quick fire; add a glassful of good bouillon, some sliced mushrooms, a glassful of white wine, and serve.

Fricasseed Rabbit. — Prepare as above; stew until very tender; then take out the rabbit, add to the gravy a cup of cream, two eggs well beaten, and a tablespoonful of butter; thicken with flour wet in cold milk; boil up once; pour over the rabbits.

Roast Rabbit. — Skin, clean, wash, and soak in slightly salted water for an hour and a half, changing it once during that time; parboil the heart and liver, chop fine, and mix with a slice of fat pork, also minced; make a forcemeat of bread crumbs, well seasoned, and quite moist, using the water in which the giblets were boiled for this, and working in the minced meat; stuff the body with this and sew it up; rub with butter and roast, basting with butter and water until the gravy flows freely, then with dripping; roast for an hour; dredge with flour a few minutes before taking it up, then froth with butter; serve on a very hot dish, and garnish with parsley and sliced lemon; add to the gravy a little lemon juice, a chopped shallot, a tablespoonful of butter, a tablespoonful of sherry, and thicken with browned flour; boil up once, and serve with the rabbit.

Rabbits or Hares. — They are unfit for eating in the early spring. All rabbits should, after being cleaned, lie in salt and water for an hour before cooking.

Puree of Snipe d la Creole (Madame Eugene). — Snipe should always be kept four days, at least, before cooking. Never pluck them until you are ready to cook them. Hang them in a cool, dry place. Take a dozen snipe, pluck them and draw them; cut off all the meat, and put it aside, with the entrails, in a mortar; put the remains of the birds in a saucepan with bouillon, parsley, laurel leaf, a clove, and two glassfuls of white wine; boil this till it is reduced to half, and strain it; pound your birds and entrails in a mortar with three ounces of fat pork, moisten with the above sauce, and pass this puree through a colander; put it in a saucepan, let it heat through without boiling, and serve on a dish surrounded by fried croutons.

Broiled Squirrels. — Take gray squirrels; skin, clean, wash, and soak in salted water to draw out the blood; wipe dry and broil on a buttered gridiron over a hot, fierce fire, turning often; when done lay on a hot dish, adding melted butter; season with pepper and salt; cover closely, and put in a hot place for five minutes before sending to table.

Ragout of Squirrels. — Prepare and soak as above; slice a tolerably large onion and fry brown in a tablespoonful of butter; stir into the frying-pan five tablespoonfuls of boiling broth, and thicken with two tablespoonfuls of browned flour; put the squirrels into a saucepan with a quarter of a pound of bacon cut into strips; add the onions and their gravy, season to taste, and put in a cupful of tepid water; cover and stew for forty minutes or until tender, pour in a glassful of wine and the juice of half a lemon, shake well, and turn into a deep covered dish.

Brunswick Stew (" Common-Sense in the Household"). — Two gray squirrels, cleaned, prepared, and soaked as above; one quart of tomatoes, peeled and sliced; one pint of lima beans; six potatoes parboiled and sliced; six ears of green corn cut from the cob; half a pound of butter; half a pound of fat salt pork cut into fine shreds; one teaspoonful of ground black pepper; half a teaspoonful of cayenne; one gallon of water; one tablespoonful of salt; two teaspoonf uls of white sugar; one onion minced small.

When the squirrels have soaked, put on the water with the salt in it and boil five minutes; then put in the onion, beans, corn, pork, potatoes, pepper, and squirrels; cover closely and stew two and a half hours very slowly, stirring frequently from the bottom; then add the tomatoes and sugar and stew for an hour longer; ten minutes before taking the pot from the fire put in the butter rolled in browned flour; give a final boil, and turn into the soup tureen.

Roast Birds with Hasty Pudding d la Verona. — Clean and truss the birds, put a small bit of fresh butter in each, and arrange them in rows, putting a piece of bacon and a sprig of laurel between each; then put them on the spit, having first rubbed them over with butter; baste with butter and water, and as soon as they begin to brown put into the dripping-pan some thick squares of cold hasty pudding; when the birds are cooked, put a bird on each square of hasty pudding, and serve.

They can be cooked in.the oven if you have no spit. All small birds are good cooked in this way.

Roast Snipe, Plover, or oiher Small Birds. — Clean and truss, and arrange in rows on the spit or in the drippingpan; baste with butter, and then with butter and water; when they begin to brown cut a round of white bread (without crust), toast quickly, butter, and lay in the dripping-pan; when the birds are done pour over them the gravy in the dripping-pan, and serve on toast.

Roast Woodcock, No. 1. — If you roast with the trail, clean, but do not draw the birds, and put the toast under them, as soon as they begin to cook, to catch the trail.

Roast Woodcock, No. 2. — Clean, draw, truss, and stuff with a rich forcemeat of bread crumbs peppered and salted, shortened with melted butter, and moistened with cream; sew them up and roast, basting with butter and water, from twenty minutes to half an hour; when half done put under them slices of toast prepared as above, and serve with the woodcock.

Venison. — Good venison should be of a rich, reddishbrown color, fine in grain, and fat.

Roast Haunch. — Wash off the outside with lukewarm water; then rub all over with fresh butter; cover with a thick paste of flour and water, then with white paper well buttered, then with thick foolscap; bind firmly with packthread; then pass on the spit and roast, allowing five hours if the haunch be large, and the fire steady and strong; baste constantly with butter and water, at intervals, to prevent scorching; half an hour before you take it up remove the papers and paste and test the haunch with a skewer; if the skewer passes easily to the bone through the thickest part, set the haunch down to a more moderate fire, and baste every few minutes with claret wine and melted butter; at the last baste with butter, dredge with flour to make a light froth, and dish, putting a frill of fringed paper round the knuckle.

Baked Haunch. — Cook precisely as above, putting a little water in the dripping-pan in which it is baked; baste as above.

Roast Week of Venison. — Roast precisely as you do the haunch, allowing a quarter of an hour to the pound.

Roast Shoulder. — This may be roasted without the paste and paper; baste often, first with butter and water, then with claret and butter, taking care never to allow it to dry.

Gravy for Roast Venison. — One pound of scraps of raw venison; one quart of water; one pinch of cloves; half a nutmeg grated; peel of half a lemon grated; salt and cayenne to taste.

Stew slowly down to one half the original quantity; then skim, strain, and put on the fire again in a clean saucepan; add three tablespoonfuls of currant jelly, a glassful of claret, two tablespoonfuls of butter, and thicken with browned flour; dish in a gravy-boat.

Serve currant or grape jelly with venison.

Stewed Shoulder of Venison. — Bone the shoulder, extracting the bones on the under side; stuff with a fine mince of fat mutton, bread crumbs, butter, and seasoned with a little nutmeg, allspice, salt, cayenne pepper, and wine; bind firmly with broad tape; baste once with melted butter; then put in a saucepan with a pint of venison gravy (made as above directed), a glassful of port wine, a few peppercorns, and a little celery, parboiled and chopped fine; cover closely and stew until tender; remove the tape, place on a hot dish, strain the gravy, and pour over the meat.

Venison Cutlets. — These are usually cut from venison which is not fat or juicy enough for roasting. They should be carefully trimmed and larded with fat pork; then lay them in a stewpan with a few pieces of young onion on each; scatter, also, a little minced parsley and thyme between the layers of meat, and pepper and nutmeg to taste; no salt, as the pork will salt sufficiently; pour over all a plain venison gravy — that is, a gravy made as above, but without wine, lemon, currant jelly, or butter; cover closely and cook twenty minutes; then take up and fry in just enough butter to keep them from burning; fry quickly, turning the cutlets constantly; then put into a hot chafing-dish and pour over them the gravy in which they have been cooked after you have strained it and added a tablespoonful of currant jelly, a teaspoonful of Worcestershire sauce, half a glassful of port wine, and a little browned flour for thickening; boil up once and pour over the cutlets; cover, and let them stand fifteen minutes before sending them to table.

Ragout of Cold Venison. — Put the bones, fat, and scraps of cold venison on to stew, with a teacupful of cold water, a button onion minced fine, parsley and thyme, pepper and salt, three or four whole cloves, and a little mace; stew for an hour, then strain and return to the saucepan, adding some cold gravy from the roast, a tablespoonful of currant jelly, one of mushroom catsup, a teaspoonful of Worcestershire sauce, and a little browned flour; boil for three minutes, lay in the venison, cut into small squares, and heat, but do not boil, for three minutes; stir frequently, and serve in a deep covered dish.

Roast Fawn. — Clean, wash thoroughly, and stuff with a rich forcemeat made of chopped pork, bread crumbs, pepper and salt, a little grated nutmeg, and the juice of a lemon; moisten with water and cream; bind with beaten egg and melted butter; sew up the fawn when stuffed, turning the legs under and binding close to the body; cover with thin slices of pork bound on with packthread, crossing in every direction; roast at a quick fire, allowing twenty-two minutes to a pound; twenty minutes before serving remove the pork and allow the fawn to brown, basting with melted butter; at the last dredge with flour, let this brown, froth with butter, and serve; garnish with watercresses or curled parsley, and serve with currant or grape jelly.

Kids, hares, or rabbits may be roasted in the same way.

Venison Ham. — Rub the hams with equal parts of salt and brown sugar; then pack the hams into a cask, sprinkling dry salt between them, and let them lie eight days, rubbing them daily with the salt and sugar; then take the hams out of the pickle, brush them over with cider vinegar, and afterwards with equal parts of fine salt, molasses, and a teaspoonful of saltpetre to every two hams; empty the cask, wash it out with cold water, and repack the hams while damp and sticky, scattering fine salt over each. Let them lie in this pickle eight days longer; then wash off with tepid water, afterwards with vinegar; then, while wet, powder them with bran, and smoke a fortnight or three weeks (if the hams are large); wrap in brown paper that has no unpleasant odor, stitch a muslin cover over this, and whitewash; chip or shave for the table.

Venison Sausages (" Common-Sense in the Household "). — Five pounds of lean venison; two pounds of salt pork; five teaspoonfuls of powdered sage; four teaspoonfuls of salt; four teaspoonfuls of black pepper; two teaspoonfuls of cayenne; one small onion; the juice of one lemon.

Chop the meat very small, season, and pack in skins or

small stone jars; keep in a cool, dry place; fry as you do other sausages.

Venison Pasty. — For the gravy, put the bones, fat, ragged and gristly bits of venison into a saucepan with sweet herbs, celery, a shallot, pepper, salt, and nutmeg; cover well with cold water and set on to boil; cut the better pieces of meat into squares (inch), and cook in another saucepan until three quarters done; line a large, deep dish with good puff paste; put in the squares of venison with half a cupful of the liquor in which the meat was stewed; season with pepper, salt, and butter, and cover with a lid of prepared pastry an inch thick; cut a round hole in the middle, fit in a tin cylinder, and bake steadily, covering the crust with clean white paper as soon as it is firm; while it is cooking prepare the gravy. When all the substance has been extracted from the bones, etc., strain the gravy, return to the saucepan, let it come to a boil, skim carefully, and add a glassful of port wine, a tablespoonful of butter, the juice of a lemon, and some browned flour to thicken; boil up once, remove the plug from the hole in the pastry, and pour in through a funnel as much gravy as the pie will hold; do this quickly, brush the crust over with beaten egg, and put the pie back in the oven until it is a rich golden russet. This operation should be rapidly performed, and at the door of the oven, or the crust will be spoiled. Bake two or three hours, guiding yourself by the size of the pie; it is good hot or cold.

Crust for Venison Pasty. — One and a half pounds of sifted flour; twelve ounces of butter; three eggs; salt; ice-water.

Dry the flour, and cut up half the butter in it with a chopper until the whole is fine and yellow; salt, and work up with ice-water, adding, last of all, the eggs beaten very light; work out rapidly, bundling as little as possible, roll out three times very thin, basting with butter, then into a lid nearly an inch thick; cover the pie with this; cut the rest of the pastry into figures and ornaments, bake on a tin plate, and glaze with beaten egg; when the pie is baked, cover the hole in the centre with one of these ornaments, and arrange the others on the crust.

Venison Steaks with Sauce. — Steaks are cut from the neck or haunch. Broil rapidly on a buttered gridiron over a clear and fierce fire, turning constantly. They require three or four minutes longer to cook than beefsteaks. While the steaks are broiling, prepare in a chafing-dish a sauce in the following proportions: A piece of butter the size of an egg for every pound of venison; one tablespoonful of currant jelly for every pound of venison; a pinch of salt, and the same of pepper; a glassful of port wine or claret for every four pounds.

This should be liquid and boiling hot by the time the steaks are done to a turn; Jay each steak in the sauce separately, and turn over and over; then cover closely and heat altogether, with the lamp burning underneath, for five minutes; serve in the chafing-dish.

Venison Steaks, Plain. — Broil as above, then dust with pepper and salt; place on a very hot dish with a lump of butter on each steak; cover with another hot dish and leave in a warm place for five minutes; then turn them over two or three times in the gravy which runs from them, and serve.

Venison Chops are cut from the loin and neck; broil and butter as above.

Wild Turkey. — Draw and wash the inside very carefully, wipe dry, and hang for twelve hours before roasting; when ready to roast wipe dry again, truss, and stuff with a rich forcemeat of bread crumbs, some bits of fat pork chopped fine, pepper, a soupcon of lean minced ham, and some boiled and peeled chestnuts; moisten with milk, and beat in an egg and two or three tablespoonfuls of melted butter; baste with butter and water at first, then three or four times with gravy, then five or six times with melted butter. It is safe to allow at least three quarters of a pound of butter for basting a large wild turkey. Dredge with flour at the last, froth with butter, and serve when the turkey is finely browned; dish on a very hot dish, surround with a wreath of water-cresses or curled parsley, and have ready cranberry, currant jelly, and a puree of chestnuts, so that your guests may have a choice of sauces.

Quails Roasted with Ham. — Clean, truss, and stuff as usual; but cover the bird with ham or pork cut in thin slices, binding all with buttered packthread; then envelop all in buttered white paper, and baste well with butter and water; roast three quarters of an hour if the fire is good, basting constantly; remove the papers and meat at the last, and brown quickly.




VEGETABLES.

GENERAL EXILES FOE COOKING VEGETABLES.

Vegetables should invariably be fresh. They should always be well picked over, and examined before using. The time required for boiling green vegetables is from thirty to forty minutes.

Green vegetables should always be put on in hot water; potatoes in cold water.

Dried vegetables, pease, beans, okra, etc., should be soaked all night before using them. Beets require from two to three hours to boil, turnips an hour, cabbage an hour and a half, parsnips three quarters of an hour, carrots two or three hours, onions one.

Tomatoes can scarcely be too much cooked. Okra should always be boiled whole. All vegetables should be carefully cooked, drained, seasoned, and served red-hot.




Artichokes, Fried. — Pull off the very outer leaves, cut off the stalk, and clean the artichokes thoroughly, then cut into small pieces, dip in beaten white of egg, roll in bread crumbs, and fry a light brown.

Artichokes, Boiled. — Clean the artichokes thoroughly, cut off the stalk, and pull off the outer leaves; then put them in a casserole with enough water to cover them, and a pinch of salt; a tablespoonful of essence of spinach had better be added some ten minutes before they are taken from the fire. This will preserve their green color. When cooked, drain, and arrange in a very hot dish; serve with bread sauce, sauce Hollandaise, or sauce Soubise.

Fricasseed Artichokes. — Prepare the artichokes as for frying, boil; when tender, throw them into cold water for a few moments, and then stew in a rich white sauce, with some cold boiled chicken, cut into pieces an inch square.

Truffled Artichokes d la Verona. — Prepare as for stuffed artichokes, substituting sliced truffles and rolled bread crumbs for any other stuffing; moisten well with melted butter, then with strong soup stock, and cook as stuffed artichokes; when about to serve, add a glassful of sherry to the gravy.

Artichokes, Farcis demi Barigoule (Cuisiniere Parisienne). — Prepare as for stuffed artichokes, but put a handful of chopped mushrooms in the stuffing, and as great a variety as possible of sweet herbs, chopped fine; put them in a saucepan with a large lump of butter for fifteen minutes, then take them out and put them into a rich white sauce; cook with fire above and below, basting the artichokes often with their sauce.

Artichokes d la Provencale (Cuisiniere Bourgeoise). — Prepare the artichokes carefully, and parboil; then arrange in a large flat dish, with two or three cloves of garlic, salt, pepper, and enough olive-oil to moisten them thoroughly; put the dish on the coals, and cook with fire below and above; when they are cooked, take out the garlic, squeeze over them the juice of a lemon, and serve.

Stuffed Artichokes. — Reserve the very large artichokes, and boil them; take out several of the inner rows of the scales, cut off the tender portions of these, and chop them fine, with a tablespoonful of fresh meat, the same of ham or pork, and a tablespoonful of bread crumbs; season the mixture with pepper and salt, moisten it with a little gravy, and add a piece of onion as large as a nutmeg, mashed to a pulp; fill the middle of the artichokes with this stuffing, set them in a pan, with a little rich gravy or broth at the bottom; cover it well, and let them stew slowly for an hour.

Boiled Jerusalem Artichokes. — Wash and scrape the artichokes, and boil them in water; then add salt, and boil them in milk until quite soft; stir in a lump of butter, well rolled in flour, a tablespoonful of rich cream; season with black pepper, salt, and a very little nutmeg.

Baked Jerusalem Artichokes. — Boil one pint of artichokes in water for fifteen minutes, and then in milk; mash them smooth; mix in them a dessertspoonful of butter, a pint of bread crumbs, pepper and salt; bake in open shells, with bread crumbs on top.

Broiled Artichokes (Cuisiniere Bourgeoise). — Parboil the artichokes; pull off the leaves; chop the eatable parts fine with a little parsley, chives, rolled bread crumbs, salt, pepper, mushroom powder, a spoonful of the finest oliveoil; put this stuffing back on the artichokes, fold in a fine folding wire broiler, well buttered, and broil over a clear, fierce fire.

Asparagus, Boiled. — Cut your stalks of equal length, rejecting the woody or lower portions, and scraping the white part which remains; throw into cold water as you scrape them; tie in a bunch with soft strings, muslin, or tape, and put into boiling water, slightly salted; if very young and fresh, it is well to tie in a piece of coarse net to protect the tops; boil from twenty to forty minutes, according to the age; just before it is done, toast two or three slices of bread, cutting off the crust; dip in the asparagus liquor, butter, and lay in a hot dish; when you take off the asparagus, drain, unbind the bundle, and heap it upon the toast, with bits of butter between the stalks.

Asparagus and Eggs. — Cut twenty-five or thirty heads of asparagus into bits half an inch long, and boil fifteen minutes; have a cupful of rich drawn butter in a saucepan, and put in the asparagus when you have drained it dry; heat together to a boil, seasoning with pepper and salt, and pour into a buttered bake-dish ; break five or six eggs carefully over the surface, put a bit of butter upon each, sprinkle with salt and pepper, and put in when the eggs are set.

Or, you may beat the eggs — yolks and whites separately — to a froth; season with butter, pepper, and salt; stir them together, with the addition of three tablespoonfuls of milk or cream, and pour evenly over the asparagus mixture in the dish; this is decidedly the better way of the two, although somewhat more troublesome.

Asparagus in Ambush. — Cut off the tender tops of fifty heads of asparagus; boil and drain them; have ready half a dozen (or more) stale biscuits or rolls, from which you have cut a neat top slice, and scraped out the crumb; set them in the oven to crisp, laying the tops beside them, that the cavities may be well dried; meanwhile, put into a saucepan a sugarless custard made of a pint — if you need so much — of milk, and four well-whipped eggs; boil the milk first, before beating in the eggs; set over the fire and stir until it thickens, when add a large spoonful of butter, a little salt and pepper, and lastly the asparagus tops, minced fine; do not let it boil, but take from the fire so soon as . the asparagus is fairly in; fill the rolls with the mixture, put on the tops, fitting them accurately; set in the oven three minutes, and arrange on a dish, to be eaten hot; the number of rolls will depend upon their size; it is better to have them small, so that one can be served to each person.

Beets Boiled. — Wash, boil several hours, or until tender; then pare, and cut them into slices (if very small leave them whole); put them into a hot dish, pepper and salt lightly, and butter abundantly.

Beets Stewed, No. 1. — Boil and pare, and, if necessary, slice as above; then put into a saucepan with a little vinegar and water, a lump of butter, some pepper and salt, and a spoonful of catsup; let them simmer slowly for some time.

Beets Stewed, No. 2. — Boil, skin, and slice as above; then put into a saucepan with a minced shallot and some parsley, two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, the same quantity of vinegar, salt and pepper; then set on the fire and simmer twenty minutes, stirring often; serve in their gravy.

Beets in Vinegar. — Boil, skin, and slice as above; put into a deep dish, pour over vinegar enough to cover them; dust with salt, cover, and leave until cold.

String, or French, Beans, No. 1. — Break off tops and bottoms, and string very carefully; then pare both edges with a sharp knife, lay the beans in salted cold water for twenty minutes, drain, and put into a saucepan of boiling water; boil quickly — twenty minutes if well-grown, less if small — but remember that the beans must be tender; drain off the water, put into a hot dish, stir in a liberal lump of butter, squeeze over the beans, the juice of a lemon, and serve.

String Beans, No. 2. — Prepare as above, then put them on the fire in cold water slightly salted, and boil until very tender; drain off the water, return to the fire in a dry saucepan, add a large lump of butter, a little white pepper, a large spoonful of cream, and let them stew gently an hour or two before serving; no vegetable, except perhaps tomatoes, is so much improved by long and slow cooking as string beans.

Lima Beans. — Only the young ones should be used; lay them in cold water for an hour and a half after they are shelled; then boil them until quite tender; drain them well, and season with a little white pepper and salt; add a large piece of butter after the beans are dished, and toss them until the butter is melted.

Kidney and other Small Beans. — Shell into cold water, and cook in boiling water until tender. A small piece of fat bacon boiled with them is an advantage to nearly all beans. If the bacon be used, the beans should not be salted.

Dried Beans. — Wash well, and soak over-night in lukewarm water, changing it several times for warmer; boil two hours; add a spoonful of burned sugar, then mash thoroughly, working in a large lump of butter.

Bacon and Cabbage. — This, I need hardly say, is a favorite country dish at the Sonth. The old-fashioned way of preparing it was to boil meat and cabbage together, and serve, reeking with fat, the cabbage in quarters, soaking yet more of the essence from the ham or middling about which it lay. In this shape it justly earned a reputation for grossness and indigestibility that banished it, in time, from many tables. Yet it is a savory and not unwholesome article of food in winter, if the cabbage be boiled in two waters, the second being the "pot-liquor" from the boiling meat; drain thoroughly in a collander, pressing out every drop of water that will flow, without breaking the tender leaves, and, when the meat is dished, lay the cabbage neatly about it, and upon each quarter a slice of hard-boiled egg; when you eat, season with pepper, salt, and vinegar.

Stuffed Cabbage, d la Creole. — Choose for this purpose a large, firm cabbage; take off the outer leaves, and lay in boiling water ten minutes, then in very cold; do this several hours before you are ready to stuff it; when perfectly cold, bind a broad tape about it, or a strip of muslin, that it may not fall apart when the stalk is taken out; remove this with a thin, sharp knife, leaving a hole about as deep as your middle finger; without widening the mouth of the aperture, excavate the centre until you have room for four or five tablespoonfuls of the forcemeat — more, if the head be large; chop the bits you take out very small; mix with some minced cold boiled pork or ham, or cooked sausage-meat, a very little onion, pepper, salt, a pinch of thyme, and some bread crumbs; fill the cavity with this, bind a wide strip of muslin over the hole in the top, and lay the cabbage in a large saucepan with a pint of "potliquor" from boiled beef or ham; stew gently until very tender; take out the cabbage, unbind carefully, and lay in a dish; keep hot while you add to the gravy, when you have strained it, pepper, a piece of butter rolled in flour, and two or three tablespoonf uls of rich milk or cream; boil up, and pour over the cabbage.

"Collards," or Cabbage Sprouts. — Pick over carefully; lay in cold water, slightly salted, half an hour; shake in a colander to drain, and put into boiling water, keeping at a fast boil until tender. A piece of pork seasons them pleasantly. In this case put the meat on first, adding the greens when it is parboiled, and cooking them together. Boil in an uncovered vessel. Drain, chop, and heap them in a dish, laying the meat on top.

Ladies' Cabbage. — Boil R' firm white cabbage fifteen minutes; change the water for boiling water; when tender, drain and set aside until perfectly cold; chop fine, and add two beaten eggs, a tablespoonful of butter, pepper, salt, three tablespoonfuls of rich milk or cream; stir all well together, and bake in a buttered pudding-dish until brown; eat very hot. I. can recommend this dish even to those who are not fond of any of the ordinary preparations of cabbage. It is digestible and palatable, resembling cauliflower in taste.

Fried Cabbage. — Chop cold boiled cabbage, and drain very dry, stirring in a little melted butter, pepper, and salt with three or four tablespoonfuls of cream ; heat all in a buttered frying-pan, stirring until smoking hot; then let the mixture stand just long enough to brown slightly on the under side. It is improved by the addition of a couple of beaten eggs. Turn out by putting a flat dish above the pan, upside down, and reversing the latter. This is a breakfast-dish.

Boiled Cabbage. — Pick off the outer green leaves, quarter, examine carefully to be sure there are no insects in it, and lay for an hour in cold water; then put into a pot with plenty of boiling water, and cook fifteen minutes; change the water, filling the pot with boiling water from the kettle; cook until tender all through. Three quarters of an hour will do for a good-sized cabbage when young. Late in the season you must be guided by the tenderness of the stalk. Drain well, chop, and stir in a tablespoonful of butter, pepper, and salt; serve very hot. If yon boil corned beef or pork to eat with cabbage, let the second water be taken from the pot in which this is cooking; it will flavor it nicely. Always boil cabbage in two waters.

Sauerkraut. — Shred or chop the cabbage fine; line a barrel, keg, or jar with cabbage-leaves on the bottom and sides; put in a layer of the cut cabbage, three inches in depth; press down well and sprinkle with four tablespoonfuls of salt; when yon have packed five layers in this way, press hard with a board cut to fit loosely on the inside of the barrel or jar; put heavy weights on this, or pound with a wooden beetle until the cabbage is a compact mass, when remove the board and put in more layers of salt and shred cabbage, repeating the pounding every four or five layers until the vessel is full; cover with leaves, and put the board on the top of these with a heavy weight to keep it down; set all away to ferment; in three weeks remove the scum, and, if need be, cover with water; keep in a cool, dry cellar. It can be eaten raw or boiled, and seasoned with pork.

Boiled Cauliflower. — Pick off the leaves and cut the stalk close to the bottom of the bunch of flowers; lay in cold water for half an hour; unless very large do not cut it; if you do, quarter it neatly; tie a close net of coarse bobbined lace or tarlatan about it to prevent breaking or bruising; put into boiling water, salted, and cook until tender; undo and remove the net, and lay the cauliflower in a hot dish; have ready a large cupful of drawn butter and pour over it; cut with a silver knife and fork in helping it, serving the sauce to each person; take it out of the water as soon Us it is done, and eat hot; it darkens with standing.

Stewed Cauliflower. — Use for this dish the smaller and more indifferent cauliflower; cut them into small clusters; lay in cold salt and water half an hour, and stew fifteen minutes in boiling water; turn most of this off, leaving but half a teacupful in the saucepan; add to this a halfcupful of milk thickened with a very little rice or wheat flour, and two tablespoonfuls of melted butter, pepper, and salt; shake the saucepan over the fire gently until it boils; take out the cauliflower with a perforated skimmer, lay in order upon a dish, and pour the sauce over them.

Scalloped Cauliflower. — Boil until tender, clip into neat clusters, and pack — the stems downward — in a buttered pudding-dish; beat up a cupful of bread-crumbs to a soft paste, with two tablespoonfuls of melted butter and three of cream or milk; season with pepper and salt, bind with a beaten egg, and with this cover the cauliflower; cover the dish closely, and bake six minutes in ft quick oven; brown five more, and serve very hot in the dish in which they were baked.

Broccoli and Brussels Sprouts. — Pick over, wash carefully, cut off the lower part of the stems, and lay in cold water, slightly salted, half an hour; cook quickly in boiling water, with a little salt, until tender; this will be in twelve or fifteen minutes; cook in an uncovered saucepan; drain well, lay in a meat-pile lightly heaped in the centre of a dish, and pour drawn butter over them, or serve this in a tureen.

Broccoli and Eggs. — Boil two or three heads of broccoli until tender; have ready two cupfuls of butter drawn in the usual way, and beat into it, while hot, four wellwhipped eggs; lay buttered toast in the bottom of a hot dish, and on this the largest head of broccoli, whole, as a centre-piece; arrange close about this the others, cut into clusters, the stems downward, and pour the egg sauce over all.

Cauliflower d la Beine. — Boil a cauliflower in salted water till tender, but not overdone; when cold, cut it up neatly in small sprigs; make a dressing of three tablespoonfuls of oil and one tablespoonful of tarragon vinegar, with pepper and salt to taste; rub a dish slightly with garlic, arrange the pieces of cauliflower on it; strew over them some capers, a little tarragon, chervil, parsley, all fairly minced, and a soupcon of dried thyme and marjoram, powdered; pour the dressing over it, and serve.

Cauliflower au Gratin. — Boil a cauliflower in salted water till tender; then put into a dish, cut it up neatly, arranging the pieces of stalk so as to form a foundation; sprinkle these with grated and browned bread crumbs and grated cheese, and a little white pepper; then upon this foundation arrange the flowery part of the cauliflower, sprinkling them thickly with grated (not browned) bread crumbs, grated cheese, and a little white pepper; stick bits of butter over the top, then set in the oven until brown; serve in same dish.

Carrots, Stewed, No. 1. — Scrape, peel, and wash the carrots, and boil until perfectly soft, with one or two onions. Carrots require a long time to cook. When quite soft, cut them in small pieces, put into a saucepan with a little meat gravy or soup stock, and let them simmer for an hour or longer, with pepper, salt, vinegar (very little), and a pinch of white sugar. If you have no soup stock or gravy, use butter, browned flour, and water, for the sauce.

Carrots, Stewed, No. 2. — Prepare as above, but omit the vinegar; use cream for the sauce, and dust the dish lightly with roasted powdered parsley.

Mashed Carrots. — Boil as above; then mash soft with a wooden beetle and work in butter, pepper, salt, and a spoonful of rich cream.

Baked Cucumbers. — Pare the cucumbers, chop them fine, with a small onion; put them on with a very little water, and let them stew for ten minutes; prepare a rich dressing as for poultry; pour off all the water from the cucumbers, add the dressing and one tablespoonful of butter, and bake in a deep dish.

Fried Cucumbers. — Slice the cucumbers when the seeds are full-grown, and before they turn yellow or ripen; sprinkle salt on the slices, let them stand for an hour, and fry them as fish, with hot butter or lard.

Fried Cucumbers & I'ltalienne. — Cut the cucumbers with a potato-cutter into fine, thin strings; throw them into ice-water for an hour; then dry them, drop into hot lard, and fry as you do Saratoga potatoes; dust with pepper and salt, and serve.

Baked Cucumbers, Stuffed. — Cut fine, large cucumbers lengthwise; scoop out a hollow in them; stuff with a rich forcemeat of bread crumbs, cold veal or chicken minced fine, salt and pepper to taste, and enough melted butter to bind all smoothly together; stuff the cucumbers with this, and bake them in a slow oven.

Stewed Cucumbers. — Pare them, and cut into thick slices; put them into a saucepan, with a minced shallot and a little water, and let them stew for fifteen minutes; pour off the water, stir in a little flour, butter, salt, and pepper; let it remain on the fire two or three minutes, and serve.

Raw Cucumbers. — Pare, cut into the thinnest possible slices, and lay in ice-water, slightly salted, for two hours; drain, put into a dish which has been rubbed with onion or garlic, and serve with a simple French dressing. A pinch of cayenne usually improves raw encumbers. You may omit the oil in the dressing if you like.

Stewed Salsify. — Scrape and wash well six or eight roots, and boil them until they are quite soft; then cut them in pieces an inch long, or less; mix a piece of butter the size of an egg with flour, very smoothly; add two or three tablespoonfuls of milk, and stir it into the saucepan with the salsify, seasoning it with salt and pepper; stir frequently, and let it stew gently half an hour.

Boiled Green Corn. — Choose young sugar corn, full grown, but tender — the milk should escape from the grain at a touch; strip off the outer leaves, turn back the inner ones carefully, remove every thread of silk, recover with the leaves, tie, put into boiling water salted, and boil from twenty minutes to an hour; cut off the stalks, and send to table wrapped in a napkin.

Stewed Green Corn. — Cut from the cob, and stew fifteen minutes in boiling water; turn off most of this, cover with cold milk, and stew until very tender; stir in 'a large lump of butter rolled in flour; cook five minutes longer, season with pepper and salt, and serve.

Roasted Green Corn. — Turn back the husks, remove the silk carefully, recover with the husks, tie tight, and roast in the hot ashes of a wood fire.

Succotash, No. 1 (Indian receipt). — One quarter of a peck of beans; one dozen ears of corn.

When cooked pour off almost all the water; cut and scrape the corn from the cob, stir in a lump of bacon, and season with pepper and salt.

Succotash, No. 2. — Two thirds of green corn cut from the cob; one third of Lima beans.

Put into boiling water enough to cover them, and stew gently together until very tender, stirring occasionally; pour off nearly all the water and add a large cupful of milk; stew in the milk for an hour; then stir in a large lump of butter rolled in flour, a tablespoonful of cream, pepper and salt to taste.

Corn and Tomatoes. — Equal quantities of green corn cut from the cob, and tomatoes peeled and sliced. Stew together half an hour; season with pepper, salt, and a little white sugar; stew fifteen minutes longer, stir in a great lump of butter, and in five minutes serve.

Sweet Corn as Prepared by the Indians. — Boil as many ears as you require of the sweet corn, such as is used for the table, and of the same degree of ripeness. It should not be boiled quite as long as for present use. Cut the grains from the cob, and spread them on large cloths in the sun and dry thoroughly; keep in a dry room; when wanted throw a few handfuls into a pot of boiling water, and boil till soft. This, in midwinter, will give a dish of corn as fine as if plucked from the field.

Hulled Corn (Indian receipt). — Boil ripe corn in weak lye until the hulls come off easily; then wash it well and put it in fresh water, and boil it till it is well swelled; then wash it again and boil it in water (in which you have put a little salt) for a short time; dish, adding butter and pepper.

Corn Pudding. — One quart of fresh green corn cut from the cob; one teacupful of cream; a lump of butter the size of an egg; pepper and salt to taste.

Mix all well together, and bake in a deep dish an hour and a half.

Corn Pie. — One pint of fresh green corn grated; one teacupful of cream; a lump of butter the size of an egg; pepper and. salt to taste.

Line a deep pie-dish with good paste, heat the grated corn before pouring it in, and bake it.

Corn Fritters. — Corn from twelve ears, well cut and scraped from the cob; two tablespoonfuls of fine white flour, sifted; two eggs well beaten; pepper and salt to taste.

Mix well together, and drop a spoonful at a time into a deep saucepan full of boiling lard; fry brown and serve.

Fried Eggplant. — Cut the egg-plants into slices at least a quarter of an inch thick; salt them and let them lie on a dish a little raised on one side that the juice may run off; let them remain thus for an hour; then flour them, add more pepper and salt, and fry brown on both sides. Egg-plant may also be dressed like salsify.

Scalloped Eggplant. — Quarter, peel, and boil the eggplant until soft enough to mash; drain, mash, add a large cupful of bread crumbs soaked in cream, a lump of butter the size of an egg, a pinch of chopped parsley, a little onion chopped fine, and pepper and salt to taste; mix all well together, put into a baking-dish, cover the top with rolled bread crumbs, and bake twenty minutes.

Stuffed Eggplants d la Creole. — Parboil the egg-plants; cut them in halves; scoop out the inside, being careful not to break the outside skin, which you refill later with the following stuffing: Mix up the inside of the egg-plant with a slice of boiled ham chopped very fine, bread crumbs, butter, salt, and pepper — shrimps, if you have them, make a delicious addition; bind this stuffing with the yolk of an egg, and fill your egg-plant skins; sprinkle with powdered bread crumbs, put a small lump of butter on each piece, and bake.

Stuffed Squash. — Parboil the squash; cut a round piece out of the top, remove the seed, make a stuffing as above, and fill your squash and bake.

Bell Peppers can also be stuffed and served in the same manner.

Large Hominy or Samp, Boiled. — One quart of hominy; enough cold water to cover the hominy eight or ten inches deep.

Boil an hour, pour off all the water, and fill the pot in the same measure with boiling water; boil for nine or ten hours steadily, refilling the pot with boiling water as it boils away; do not stir nor uncover the pot; when tender uncover and move it where it will only simmer, until the water is absorbed; then drain dry; serve very hot, with butter, pepper, and salt.

To Boil Small Hominy. — One quart of hominy; two quarts of water slightly salted.

Boil slowly for an hour and a half, stirring occasionally; when nearly done pour in a pint of milk, and simmer until it thickens.

Fried Hominy. — Cold boiled hominy should be formed into round pats, and fried in boiling butter or lard.

Baked Hominy. — One cupful of cold boiled hominy; two cupfuls of milk; one large dessertspoonful of butter melted; one teaspoonful of white sugar; salt to taste; three eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately.

Work the yolks in alternately with the melted butter, then the sugar and salt, then very gradually the milk; lastly, stir in the whites, and bake in a buttered puddingdish till cooked.

Hominy Croquettes. — One pint of cold boiled hominy; one egg; one tablespoonful of melted butter; one tablespoonful of fine flour; one tablespoonful of cracker era mbs; one teaspoonful of salt.

Mix all well together, form into oval balls, dip in beaten egg, roll in bread crumbs, and fry them in boiling lard.

Browned Hominy. — Mash and season with salt and melted butter as much cold boiled hominy as required; put pieces of lard and butter, mixed, into a small, deep frying-pan, and, as it melts, toss and turn it until the pan is hot and well greased; then put in the hominy, cover the pan closely with a plate, and set it where it will not burn; when the hominy is thoroughly heated through, remove the cover, and let it brown on the bottom and sides.

Lettuce au Jus (Cuisiniere Bourgeoise). — Take firm, apple-shaped lettuce, and pull off the loose green leaves; wash and blanch ten minutes in boiling water, then drain and press dry lightly with a clean cloth; make a small incision in the heart of each lettuce, and put in 6ome bread crumbs soaked in strong stock, a tiny dice of fat bacon, a little pepper, and a soupcon of nutmeg; bind the lettuce firmly in shape with strong thread; then line a deep saucepan with slices of fat bacon, carrots, onions, and a bunch of sweet herbs; place the lettuce in the bottom of the saucepan, cover them with slices of bacon and vegetables, moisten well with beef bouillon and strong gravy, stew two hours, and serve with the sauce in which they have been cooked thickened with browned flour.

Lettuce a la Crime or d la Chartreuse. — Proceed as above, omitting the bacon and soup stock, and using instead butter and cream.

Stuffed Lettuce (Cuisinih'e Parisienne). — Prepare as above, removing, however, the innermost hearts, and chopping them up with a rich forcemeat of minced veal and chicken, bread crumbs, melted butter, etc.

Stewed Lettuce (Cuisiniere Parisienne). — Pull off the loose green leaves; wash the lettuce well in several waters; throw into boiling water, salted, and cook half an hour; take out of the water, and drain dry; then take a clean cloth and press the lettuce into balls; then chop fine; put into a saucepan a piece of butter rolled well in flour, stir well, put in the lettuce, and stir until they dry; then add some good gravy or bouillon, a little salt and white pepper, and the tiniest pinch of nutmeg; when quite tender add two tablespoonfuls of rich cream; serve with croutons (crusts) of fried bread. You may omit the stock and cook simply in milk if you like.

Stewed Chiccory. — Prepare as above.

Rules for Cooking Mushrooms. — Select always the freshest and finest. They should be round, small, firm, the under side salmon or pink, the outside grayish white, with pink gills. No other sort of mushroom is safe. Cook in a porcelain-lined saucepan, always cooking a peeled white onion in the pot. Should the onion turn black, the mushrooms are unsafe. If you do not like the flavor of the onion, put a silver spoon into the pot and leave it while you cook the mushrooms; if it should tarnish the mushrooms are unsafe. Pick over the mushrooms carefully, wash, and wipe with a flannel cloth.

Stewed Mushrooms, No. 1. — Wash and peel the mushrooms, sprinkle salt over them, and let them stand a short time; to a pint of juice add a small teacupful of milk, and stew them for nearly an hour; if they do not give out much juice, add a little more milk to prevent them from drying; when stewed add a lump of butter the size of an egg, a little salt, red and black pepper, and a spoonful of rich cream.

Stewed Mushrooms, No. 2. — Proceed as above, using beef or chicken broth (or even water) instead of milk, and adding a small teacupful of sherry when you put in the butter.

Stewed Mushrooms, No. 3. — Put the mushrooms into a saucepan with a little cream, salt, and pepper; let them simmer a few minutes, and when you remove them stir in a little piece of butter; keep them covered all the time, and serve hot.

Scalloped Mushrooms. — Choose for this purpose fine, firm ones. Pick, wash, wipe, and peel as usual; then lay them in a deep pudding-dish well buttered; season them with pepper and salt and a very little onion; sprinkle each layer with rolled bread crumbs, dot with little pieces of butter, and proceed in this way until the dish is full, having the top layer of bread crumbs; bake in a moderate oven.

Broiled Mushrooms. — Take large, fine mushrooms; pick, wash, wipe, and peel them; take off the stems, and boil them in a little cream or milk; place the mushrooms in a fine folding wire broiler; place this over the coals and turn it frequently, removing the mushrooms as they are done to a hot, covered dish. .'; ...

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Mushrooms, Steamed, No. 1 (Soyer). — Cut two slices of bread half an inch thick, and large enough to cover the bottom of a plate; cut off the crust, toast them a light brown on both sides, and spread some Devonshire cream (i. e., sweet, rich cream, clotted); then, having previously cleaned the mushrooms, put them head downward on the toast, sprinkle them lightly with salt and white pepper, and place in each mushroom as much clotted cream as it will hold; then put a small tumbler or cup over each mushroom, pushing it well down into the toast; put the mushrooms so prepared into the oven and cook fifteen minutes; when you remove them from the oven do not remove the glass for several minutes. This is incomparably the best way of cooking mushrooms. The inverted glass condenses the peculiar aroma which is the glory of the mushroom.

Mushrooms, Steamed, No. 2 (Soyer). — Proceed as above; but if you have no clotted cream, make a sauce in the following manner: Boil some milk until it is reduced to cream, with a little salt, pepper, and one clove; when warm put in an ounce of butter mixed with a little flour; stir well; put the mushrooms on the toast with this sauce, cover with a basin, and place in the oven for half an hour. All kinds of mushrooms are delicious in this way.

Mushrooms d la Itusse. — Choose the finest button mushrooms you can get; wipe clean and white with a wet flannel cloth, and cut off the stalks; stew ten minutes in a porcelain saucepan; strain partially, and cover with as much rich sour cream as you have water; stew five minutes, and add some veal gravy and a very little lemon juice, and salt and red pepper to taste. They should be pretty hot.

Mushroom Loaf. — Carefully wash the mushrooms, wiping them dry and white with a flannel cloth; put into a porcelain saucepan, together with a sliced onion and a little pepper and salt; cover with cold broth, and stew very gently for fifteen minutes; then add a tablespoonful of butter, divided into bits and rolled in browned flour; boil three or four minutes; then add three tablespoonfuls of white wine beaten up with egg, and stir two minutes more; have ready a baker's well-baked, stale loaf, from the inside of which all the crumb has been removed. This must be done in the following manner: Make a round hole in the bottom of the loaf and carefully dig out as much of the crumb as possible, while keeping the shape of the loaf; now stuff the hollowed loaf with the mushrooms, adding, also, the bread crumbs, moistened with the sauce in which the mushrooms were cooked; when the loaf is filled, stop up the hole with a piece of bread, and put the loaf in a casserole, the bottom of which must be covered with slices of ham; add all the mushroom sauce and bread crumb which remain, and, after basting the loaf carefully with melted butter, cook it with fire below and above, and until it is thoroughly heated through and finely browned; baste once again with butter, and serve in a very hot dish. (Delicious.)

Mushroom Toast. — Stew some mushrooms as above, substituting water for the broth, and cream for the white wine; have ready some muffins, each sliced in four, lightly toasted and buttered on both sides, and arrange the mushrooms in layers between the slices^of toast; pour over them some boiling milk, with which the sauce in which the mushrooms were cooked has been stirred; cover closely for five minutes before serving.

Roast Mushrooms, No. 1. — Clean and wipe the mushrooms, and arrange them on buttered toast, and with a little butter in the hollow of each, in a Dutch oven; sprinkle with pepper and salt, dredge very lightly with flour, and turn from time to time.

Roast Mushrooms, No. 2. — Choose some mushrooms and prepare as for "Mushroom Loaf;" but some time before using them put them to soak in a little melted butter with a soupcon of garlic; then skewer them carefully, and roast over a clear, fierce fire, basting occasionally with butter; meanwhile, boil the stems in a little broth, and, when the mushrooms are cooked, transfer to a very hot dish, cover, and strain the gravy, adding salt and pepper, a lump of butter, and a wineglassful of sherry; pour over the mushrooms, and serve.

Baked Mushrooms. — Choose fine mushrooms, prepare as usual; put them to soak for an hour in a little cream, with a shallot; then envelop each mushroom closely in buttered white paper, and bake in a moderate oven; salt and pepper them, and serve.

Nettles and Dandelions, gathered before they are in flower, may be dressed like spinach and served on toast or garnished with pieces of fried bread, and are a wholesome addition to the list of vegetables.

Nettles or Hop Tops, served as Asparagus (excellent). — Break off the young shoots of hops, tie them in bundles, and boil them with a little meat for twenty minutes; serve as asparagus.

Boiled Onions. — Cut off tops and tails, and skin them; lay in cold water half an hour; then put into a saucepan with enough boiling water to cover them; cook fifteen minutes and drain off the water, re-covering them with more from the boiling kettle; boil until a straw will pierce them; drain and put into a dish with pepper, salt, and plenty of butter; serve with the drawn butter in a butter-boat. Never cook onions in an iron pot.

Stewed Onions. — Young onions should always be cooked in this way: Top, tail, and skin them; lay them in cold water half an hour or more, then put into a saucepan with hot water enough to cover them; when half done, throw off all the water except a small teacupful — less, if your mess is small; add a like quantity of milk, a large spoonful of butter, with pepper and salt to taste; stew gently until tender, and turn into a deep dish.

If the onions are strong and large, boil in three waters, throwing away all of the first and second, and reserving a very little of the third to mix with the milk.

It ought to be more generally known that the disagreeable odor left by any 6*f the onion family upon the breath may be removed by chewing and swallowing a few grains of roasted coffee. No more nutritious vegetable ever finds its way to our tables; and it is greatly to be regretted that the unpleasant result just named should deter so many from eating it. It is especially beneficial to brain-workers and nervous invalids — the very people who are least likely to use it.

Baked Onions. — The large Spanish or Bermuda onions are the only kinds which are usually baked. Wash clean, but do not remove the skins; boil an hour. The water should be boiling when they are put in, and slightly salt. Change it twice during this time, always replenishing with more boiling-hot water, and simmer in the oven for an hour, basting often with melted butter; when done, take the onions up carefully and arrange the open ends uppermost in a vegetable dish; add to the gravy in the drippingpan the juice of half a lemon, four tablespoonfuls of cream or milk, and a little browned flour wet with cold milk; boil up once, and pour over the onions.

Stuffed Onions. — Wash and skin very large Bermuda onions; lay in cold water an hour; parboil in boiling water half an hour; drain, and while hot extract the hearts, taking care not to break the outer layers; chop the inside thus obtained very fine, with a little cold fat or bacon; add bread crumbs, pepper, salt, mace, and wet with a spoonful or two of cream; bind with a well-beaten egg, and work into a smooth paste; stuff the onions with this; put into a dripping-pan with a very little hot water; turn off the water; take the onions out and lay upon a cloth, that all the moisture may be absorbed or evaporate; roll each in a round piece of buttered tissue-paper, twisting in at the top to keep it closed, and bake in a slow oven nearly an hour; when tender all through, peel them, put them into a deep dish, and brown slightly, basting with butter freely; this will take, perhaps, a quarter of an hour more; serve in a vegetable dish, and pour over the melted butter when you have sprinkled with pepper and salt.

Pea Fritters or Cakes — Cook a pint or three cups more peace than you need for dinner; mash while hot with a wooden spoon, seasoning with pepper, salt, and butter; put by until morning; make a batter of two whipped eggs, a cupful of milk, quarter teaspoonful soda, half a teaspoonful of cream of tartar, and half a cup of flour; stir the pea mixture into this, beating very hard, and cook as you would ordinary griddle-cakes.

Green Pease. — Shell and lay in cold water until you are ready to cook them; put into salted boiling water, and cook from twenty minutes to half an hour; if young and fresh, the shorter time will suffice; if just gathered from your own vines and tender, season only with salt. Market pease are greatly improved by the addition of a small lump of white sugar. It improves taste and color. The English always put it in, also a sprig of mint, to be removed when the pease are dished. Drain well, and dish with a great lump of butter stirred in, and a little pepper; keep hot.

Buttered Parsnips. — Boil until tender, scrape, and cut lengthwise a quarter of an inch thick; broil on a wellbuttered gridiron, over a clear fire, turning them often; when sufficiently cooked, transfer to a very hot dish ; butter well, turning them over and over; pour over a little boiling-hot cream, and serve.

Fried Parsnips. — Boil until tender, scrape off the skin, and cut lengthwise in thick slices; dredge with flour, and fry in hot dripping, turning often; drain off the fat, pepper lightly, and serve.

Boiled Parsnips. — If young, scrape; if old, pare carefully; put into slightly salted boiling water, and boil until tender; test by piercing with a fork; when tender, drain and cut lengthwise, butter well, salt and pepper, and serve.

Parsnip Fritters. — Boil two large parsnips; mash them well into a batter made of one tablespoonful of rolled bread crumbs, two tablespoonfuls of milk, and one egg; season it with salt and pepper; drop a tablespoonful at a time into boiling lard, and fry a light brown.

Mashed Parsnips. — Boil until very tender, mash to a smooth cream, add a lump of butter, pepper and salt to taste, and two spoonfuls of cream; shape into a mound, and serve.

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Potatoes, to CooJc. — " There are great varieties of potatoes, and as many ways of cooking them, but boiling is always better than steaming" (Meg Dods). — "Steam, or else boil until half done; then throw in salt and cold water; boil till nearly done; pour off the water, and leave the potatoes in the pot, and as near the fire as possible" (Mrs. Rundell). — " Boil in as little water as possible, without burning the saucepan" (Mrs. Glasse). — " Peel the pota'toes, and boil them slowly; when done, pour off the water, throw salt over, and shake the pot violently for some time, so that they are broken" (Mrs. Acton, "Lancashire Cookery ").

Potatoes, to Choose. — First, remember that the smaller the eye the better the potato; secondly, nip a piece from the thickest end with your finger-nail; if good, the inside will be of a white, yellow, or reddish hue, according to the quality; if spotted, though ever so slightly, the potatoes are bad. In the spring of the year potatoes are always bad, as the old ones are deteriorating, and the new ones are flavorless and watery.

Potatoes, to Boil. — The various methods of boiling given by the above ancient authorities — Meg Dods, Mistresses Glasse, Rundell, and Acton — are all good, but different varieties of potatoes require different methods of boiling.

New Potatoes are much better if thrown into very hot water, with a little salt, and boiled quickly — from fifteen to twenty minutes.

Watery Potatoes should be peeled and thrown into boiling water; when done, the water should be poured off, and some salt thrown over the potatoes, which should be left in the pot near the fire, and shaken violently from time to time. If so watery by nature that this does not succeed, the potatoes should be washed clean, and put into the pot in their skins; the pot should then be filled up with water, and a piece of lime, the size of a nut, thrown in; this will render the potatoes mealy.

Boiled Potatoes, in their Skins. — Choose them of uniform size, with a smooth skin, and boil in cold water, with a pinch of salt; cook steadily, until the skins begin to crack, and you can with a fork pierce them to the heart; pour off all the water, sprinkle them with salt, and leave them uncovered near the fire for about five minutes; serve in a very hot dish.

Boiled Potatoes, without the Skin. — Pare as thinly as possible, lay in cold water for half an hour; then drop them in boiling water, slightly salted, and keep at a rapid boil until tender; drain off the water and salt, and dry as above directed.

Roast Potatoes. — It is impossible to roast potatoes otherwise than with the aid of a wood fire. They should be washed clean, wiped dry, and buried in hot ashes and cinders. When thoroughly cooked they should be carefully wiped clean with a clean cloth, and served in their jackets, in a very hot dish. Eat with salt and butter.

Soyer's Roast Potatoes. — Take large, fine potatoes, parboil them, remove the skins, and put them into a deep dish which has previously been well buttered, and lightly dredged with sifted flour; stick bits of butter among the potatoes, dredge them with flour, salt, and pepper, and cook them before the fire in a Dutch oven ; when properly cooked they are light brown in color, and are delicious. They may also be cooked in the oven, but they are not so good.

Baked Potatoes. — Wash and wipe some large ripe potatoes, and bake in a quick oven until tender; i. e., from three quarters of an hour to an hour, if the potatoes are large; press each potato until it cracks, in a clean cloth, and serve in a folded napkin, on a very hot dish; eat with salt and butter.

Desiree's Potatoes (Creole method of making poor potatoes palatable). — Wash the potatoes, wipe them dry, peel, and carefully cut out all the bad parts; boil them according to the receipt for treating watery potatoes, and drain, salt, and dry; shake them carefully until they are a meaty, dry mass; then take a clean, coarse, dry pudding-cloth, and, putting a double-handful of potatoes in it, wring the cloth until the potato is quite dry; place on a hot dish, and proceed in this way until the potatoes are thus formed into a pile of apparently large, fine, whole, mealy potatoes.

Stewed Potatoes, with Cream. — Pare and boil the potatoes, and set them away to cool; cut each potato, when cold, into six or eight pieces; make a sauce of half a pint, equal parts, cream and milk, a piece of butter the size of an egg, and plenty of sauce; white pepper to taste; boil the sauce with a little dash of flour in it, and stew the potatoes for a quarter of an hour; just before removing the stewpan from the fire, stir in two more tablespoonfuls of cream.

,Potatoes d la Maitre d' Hotel. — Cut cold boiled potatoes into small round pieces, and stew as above, omitting the cream and flour, and using a larger piece of butter; use also black pepper instead of white; just before removing the stewpan from the fire sprinkle some parsley over the potatoes; boil up once, and serve on a very hot dish; squeeze the juice of a lemon over the potatoes before sending them to table.

Curled Potatoes (Mary Anne's). — Wash, boil, drain and dry as for " DesireVs Potatoes," and press through a perforated tin. They are very good, and look like a delicate sort of vermicelli. Excellent with fish.

Soyer's Sausage Potatoes. — Take large, fine potatoes, wash, wipe dry, but do not peel; cut off the tops, and with a scoop cut out a round piece as big as a shilling through the potato; insert into this a small, lightly fried sausage; put the tops on the potatoes, arrange them carefully in a deep dish with the cut part uppermost, and bake in a quick oven; Serve in the dish in which they have been cooked; pin a napkin round the dish.

Stuffed Potatoes. — Take large, fair potatoes, peel, wipe dry, and scoop out as much as possible of the inside; stuff them with any meat or fowl, chopped fine, flavored with a very little onion and moistened with butter; replace the tops on the potatoes, arrange them in a deep dish, and serve.

Stuffed Potatoes, No. 2 (" Common-Sense in the Household "). — Take large, fair potatoes, bake until soft, and cut a round piece off the top of each; scrape out the inside carefully, so as not to injure the skin, and set aside the empty cases with their covers; wash the inside carefully, working into it, while hot, some butter and cream; season with salt, pepper, and a good pinch of grated cheese for each; work it soft with cream, and put it into a saucepan to heat, stirring to prevent burning; when scalding hot stir in one well-beaten egg for six large potatoes; boil up once, fill the skins with the mixture, replacing the caps; return them to the oven for three minutes; arrange on a napkin in a deep dish, caps uppermost; cover with a fold of the napkin, and eat hot.

Browned Potatoes, with Dripping. — Peel and parboil some good potatoes, drain dry, prick in several places, dredge well with flour, and (after having first skimmed the fat off) arrange them in the dripping-pan and cook them three quarters of an hour, under the beef; bake and turn them often, and, when quite brown, drain on a wire sieve or on paper, and serve hot.

Potato Marbles. — Potato marbles are shaped with the little instrument made for such purposes, and to be bought at all kitchen-furnishing shops. Cut the marbles, throw them into salt and water, and let them remain all night; parboil them, drop them into boiling lard, and fry them a light brown; dust lightly with roasted parsley before serving.

Saratoga Potatoes.— Peel the potatoes, slice them with a coleslaw cutter, and throw them into ice-water; let them lie in it several hours, even for a night, and wipe quite dry; have ready a skillet, with boiling lard quite deep in it; throw the potatoes in, and they will brown quickly; lift them out with a perforated skimmer, and drain on a dish spread with soft paper.

Potato Balls. — Duchesses. — Take half a dozen potatoes, boil them, pass them through a sieve, and work into them, in a bowl, one gill of cream and the yolks of three eggs; add pepper, salt, a soupcon of nutmeg, and some parsley, finely grated; when they are well mixed and smooth, mould them into perfectly round balls, flour them, and fry them in hot lard or butter, rolling them continually so that they may be evenly browned; drain, and serve on a folded napkin.

Potato Souffle is made according to the foregoing receipt, beating the whites and yolks of the eggs separately, the latter to the stiffest possible froth; when all the ingredients are mixed, beat very light, pour into a buttered mould, sprinkling the top with rolled bread crumbs and a soupgon of cheese; bake instantly in a quick oven.

Tossed Potatoes. (Mary Anne's). — Chop some cold boiled potatoes fine, and put them into a frying-pan with a little fat of cold beef also chopped fine; add pepper and salt to taste; stir and toss the potatoes about continually, sometimes taking the pan from the fire and shaking it; cook quickly, and do not cease tossing the potatoes for a moment; when nicely browned, serve on a very hot dish. They will be found delicious.

Lyonnaise Potatoes. — Cut some cold boiled potatoes into small square blocks; shred half an onion finely; drop potatoes and onion into boiling lard and fry a light brown; drain on paper and serve in a very hot dish; dust with powdered parsley before serving.

Potatoes with Ham. — Boil some potatoes, slice them quite thin, put them in a pan with a good-sized piece of butter, and let them heat thoroughly, but not fry; boil four eggs hard and chop them fine, and chop fine about as much cold boiled ham as there is of potato; put all into a dish in layers, with a little salt, parsley, and chopped onion on each layer; pour over the whole four large cupfulls of cream; cover the top with bread crumbs, dot the bread crumbs with small bits of butter, and bake a light brown.

Potato Scallops. — Boil some potatoes, slice them fine, and heat as above; put them into scallop shells which have been previously buttered and dusted with bread crumbs; fill the scallop shells only half full of potato, then add some egg and cream beaten up together; sprinkle the top with bread crumbs, and bake in a quick oven.

Fried Potatoes, No. 1. — Pare the potatoes raw, and cut them lengthwise into slices; cut these again into thin strips; lay in ice-water for half an hour; drain, dry thoroughly, and drop into boiling lard; when brown put them into a colander and set it in a hot oven to drain; serve hot.

Fried Potatoes, No. 2. — Chop cold boiled potatoes into bits, season with pepper and salt, and fry lightly in dripping or butter, turning them constantly until nicely browned.

Piquant Potatoes d la Baviere (Frau von P. zu P.). — Slice some cold boiled potatoes very thinly; then beat up in a bowl some wry rich sweet or sour cream, adding just enough French mustard to give it a piquant taste; then take a wide, deep dish, butter it carefully, and lay a layer of the potatoes on the bottom; stick little bits of butter thickly on the top of this layer, then put a layer of slices of hard-boiled egg, then more potato, and so on until the dish is full; each layer must be sprinkled with salt and dotted with little bits of butter, also moistened sufficiently with cream; proceed in this way until the dish is full; then pour in the remainder of the cream, dust the top lightly with bread crumbs, and heat in the oven; serve with a napkin pinned round the dish.

Potato Cakes,No. 1. — Mash as above directed, form (when cold) the potato into small round cakes (size of a tumbler), flour well, and bake on a buttered pan in a quick oven.

Potato Cakes, No. 2. — Proceed as above, but fry in lard or sweet dripping until brown.

Broiled Potatoes (" Common-Sense in the Household "). - — Cut whole boiled potatoes lengthwise into slices a qnarter of an inch thick, and broil on a buttered gridiron over a hot, bright fire.

Potato Ribbon (" Common-Sense in the Household "). — Pare and lay in ice-water for an hour; then pare with a small knife round and round in one continuous curling strip; drop into boiling lard or clarified drippings, drain, and arrange neatly on a hot dish.

Potato Hay (German receipt). — Prepare as above and lay in ice-water; then with a potato-cutter cut the potato into small, fine, thin snips or straws; fry as above directed.

Mashed Potatoes (Soyer). — Boil potatoes until mealy, rub off the skins, remove the specks, put them into a bowl, and take two forks in one hand with the points of the prongs turned outward; break the potatoes with them; while breaking add butter and milk — an ounce of butter, and a gill of milk to every dozen potatoes; salt and white pepper to taste. The potatoes should be beaten a great deal until quite light; they should never be hard like paste, as is the case if they are stirred with a spoon.

Mashed Potatoes, Browned, No. 1. — Proceed as above, form into a mound, and set in the oven until brown ; glaze with butter, and serve.

Mashed Potatoes, Browned, No. 2. — Mash as above, adding a very little parsley and boiled onion, form into small oval balls, dredge with flour, and put under the meat half an hour before it is served; drain dry, and arrange round the meat.

Sweet Potatoes, to Roast. — Choose large, fine potatoes; wash, wipe dry, and bury in hot wood ashes pr embers until "cooked; wipe clean, and serve on a folded napkin in a hot dish.

Baked Sweet Potatoes. — Wash, wipe dry, and place them on the shelf of the range oven; watch them, and from time to time turn them that they may cook mealy ; when done, which can be told by squeezing them, take them from the oven and keep them in a hot place until ready to serve; serve in their skins on a folded napkin; eat with salt and butter.

Sweet Potatoes, Fried. — Pare the potatoes raw and cut them lengthwise in slices; have a pot of boiling lard ready, into which drop the slices; have ready a colander, and dry the potatoes in it in a hot oven.

Broiled Sweet Potatoes. — Parboil, cut lengthwise into slices a quarter of an inch thick, and broil on a buttered gridiron over a clear fire; serve on a hot dish, salt the potatoes lightly, and dot them with bits of butter.

Sweet Potatoes with Cream. — Wash them well, scrape or pare, and if very large cut them in two lengthwise; drop into boiling water; when boiled drain, dry, and shake; when quite dry season as follows: For six persons put in a piece of butter the size of a hen's egg, a pinch of salt, a little white pepper, a tablespoonful of sugar sprinkled evenly over them, and half a cupful of good, sweet cream; cover tightly, and let them stand on the fire about five minutes before serving.

South Carolina Mode of Boiling Eice. — Wash the rice in cold water, pick it well, and let it lie in cold water until you are ready to cook it; then pour the water off, and sprinkle the rice into a saucepan of boiling water slightly salted; boil it steadily for twenty minutes, then take it off the fire and drain all the water from it; Place the saucepan, with the lid partly off, on a corner of the fire, where it is only moderately warm, to allow the rice to "soak" or dry. The moisture will pass off, and each grain of rice, swelled and burst open, will stand alone. When served the grains will fall apart if shaken. This is the only method of preparing rice to be eaten as a vegetable.

Rice Croquettes. — Boil about half a pound of rice in a quart of milk; when it is thick and stiff take it off the fire, add two ounces of butter and the yolks of four eggs; set it away until it is cold enough to form into oval balls; dip them into yolk of egg, then in bread crumbs, and fry in equal quantities of butter and lard.

Boiled Sea-kale. — Pick over very carefully, tie in bunches, and lay in cold water for an hour; put into salted boiling water, and boil twenty or thirty minutes, until tender; remove the thread, place on buttered toast, butter abundantly, and serve.

Stewed Sea-kale. — Wash, clip off the stems, tie, and proceed as above, but boil only fifteen minutes; drain, remove the threads, and put into another saucepan with a little rich gravy; stew until tender, dish, and serve.

Ochra. — Wash, pick, and boil, in enough salted water to cover them, until tender; drain thoroughly, dish, and pour over them three tablespoonfuls of melted butter, a tablespoonful of vinegar, pepper and salt to taste. This sauce should be boiling hot.

Kale-cannon. — Take equal quantities of boiled cabbage and potatoes; chop the cabbage fine and mash the potatoes; chop up and mix, also, one large boiled onion; mix these all well together, adding a large lump of butter, salt, and black pepper; stew slowly over a moderate fire, and put into a covered dish.

Squash, Boiled. — Pare and cut in small pieces; put them over the fire with just enough water to cover them, and keep the pot covered; when they are tender enough drain thoroughly, mash to a smooth paste, adding butter, pepper, and salt.

Squash, Baked. — These receipts apply only to the marrow squash. Prepare as for boiling, and put into a pan in a very slow oven; put some water in the pan to keep them from burning; then, when cooked, mash with butter, pepper, and salt.

Summer Squash or Cymbling. — Pare, quarter, take out the seeds, and lay the pieces in cold water; then boil until very tender; drain thoroughly; mash soft and smooth with butter, white pepper, and salt.

Winter Squash. — Pare, seed, and quarter as above; let it lie in cold water for two hours before cooking; then boil until very tender, and mash, etc., as above.

Stewed Pumpkin. — Cut in two, seed, slice, and pare; soak in cold water for one hour; then put over the fire in a pot of boiling water, and stew gently, stirring often until it breaks; drain, press, and mash through a colander; then return to the saucepan with a tablespoonfnl of butter; pepper and salt to taste; stir rapidly until heated through.

Baked Pumpkin. — Choose a fine, rich pumpkin; seed, pare, quarter, and cut in slices half an inch thick; arrange in a wide, shallow baking-pan with a little water, two slices deep, and bake very, very slowly until dry and tender; then butter each strip on both sides, and eat with breadand-butter.

Spinach a la Crime. — Boil and chop very fine, or rub through a colander; season with pepper and salt; beat in, while warm, three tablespoonfuls of melted butter (this is for a large dish); put into a saucepan and heat, stirring constantly; when smoking hot add three tablespoonfuls of cream and a teaspoonful of white sugar; boil up once, still stirring, and press firmly into a hot bowl or other mould; turn into a hot dish and garnish with boiled eggs.

Boiled Spinach. — Imprimis, always buy enough spinach, as it shrinks terribly in cooking; a peck suffices for a family of four or five. Pick it over very carefully — it is apt to be gritty — wash in several waters, and let it lie in the last half an hour at least; take out with your hands, shaking each bunch well, and put into boiling water with a little salt; boil from fifteen to twenty minutes; when tender, drain thoroughly, chop very fine, put into a saucepan with a piece of butter the size of an egg, and pepper to taste; stir until very hot, turn into a dish, and shape into a flattopped mound with a silver or wooden spoon; slice some hard-boiled eggs and lay on top.

Or, for spinach glace, rub the yolks of the eggs to a powder, mix with butter, and when your mound is raised, spread smoothly over the flat top. Four eggs will dress a good-sized dish. Cut the whites into rings, and garnish, laying them on the yellow surface. This makes it pleasant dressing for the spinach.

Mashed Turnips. — Peel, lay in slightly salted cold water for half an hour, put on in boiling water, boil tender, mash in the colander with a wooden spoon, stirring in at the last a tablespoonful of butter with pepper and salt to taste, and serve hot.

If eaten with boiled corned beef, you may take a little of the liquor from the pot in which the meat is cooking; put it into a saucepan, boil up once, to throw off the scum, skim clean, and cook turnips in this.

Or, if the turnips are young, rub them, when tender* through the colander; add a little milk, butter, pepper, and salt; heat to boiling in it clean saucepan, and serve.

Young Turnips, Boiled Whole. — Pare smoothly, and trim all into the same size and shape; lay in cold water half an hour; put on in boiling water with a tablespoonful of butter, and stew until tender; drain dry without crushing or breaking them, pile in a deep dish, and cover with a rich white sauce; eat hot.

Stewed Tomatoes. — Put ten or twelve large,ripe tomatoes into a pan, and pour scalding water over them to remove the skins; peel and cut out all the hard parts, then cut in half horizontally and take the seeds out; mince an onion fine and add it, with pepper and salt to taste; put them on to stew in a pipkin and let them simmer several hours, the longer the better; when they have stewed an hour, add a piece of butter the size of an egg, and five tablespoonfuls of rolled bread crumbs; stir well, and twenty minutes later add three lumps of loaf sugar.

Ochra and Tomatoes. — Stew for an hour a can of tomatoes, adding pepper and salt; wash a quarter of a peck of young and tender ochra, cut off the stems, throw them into the stewpan with the tomatoes; and let them all stew gently until the ochra begins to open; then stir them well; add a little onion to the tomatoes; when first put on season with pepper (red) and salt, stir in two lumps of loaf sugar, and serve very hot.

Scallop of Tomato and Ochra. — Prepare as above, arrange in a baking-dish with layers of bread crumbs, and bake. Very good.

Scallop of Tomatoes and Rice. — Boil one pint of rice, and mix in it, while hot, one large spoonful of butter, and pepper and salt to taste; add one can of tomatoes and one teaspoonful of sugar; bake in a well-greased pan.

Scalloped Tomatoes and Green Com. — Make as above, substituting for the rice a pint of green corn cut from the cob and boiled, and seasoning with some fat pork minced fine, a chopped shallot, pepper, salt, and sugar; pack in a pudding-dish in layers; let the top layer be tomatoes,butter, and seasoning; sift rolled bread crumbs over the top to brown the scallop; bake covered half an hour; then uncover and brown.

Scalloped Tomatoes. — Peel and cut in slices a quarter of an inch thick; pack in a pudding-dish in alternate layers with a forcemeat made of rolled bread crumbs, salt, pepper, butter, and a little white sugar; spread thickly upon each stratum of tomatoes, and when the dish is nearly full, put tomatoes uppermost, a good bit of butter upon each one; dust with pepper and a little sugar; strew with dried bread crumbs, bake,covered, half an hour, remove the lid, and bake brown.

Tomatoes and Eggs. — Peel the skins from a dozen large tomatoes, put four ounces of butter into a frying-pan, add a small onion minced fine, and pepper and salt to taste; fry the tomatoes, and from time to time chop them while frying; when the tomatoes are well cooked break six eggs into the pan, stir the whole quickly, and serve hot.

Baked Tomatoes, Stuffed. — Take fine, large tomatoes, cut a piece off the top, and with an apple-corer or sharp knife carefully remove the hard part in the middle of the tomato, and scoop out as large a hole as possible without spoiling the shape; make a stuffing of rolled bread crumbs, a very little onion mashed to a pulp, a pinch of white sugar, salt and pepper to taste, a little tomato mashed smooth, and enough melted butter to bind all well together; fill each of the tomatoes with this, put a small piece of butter on top, and bake them slowly in the oven.

Fried Tomatoes, Stuffed. — Prepare as above, but divide in the middle; when well stuffed fry in butter.

Baked Tomatoes. — Prepare the tomatoes, and season them exactly as for stewing; place them in a baking-dish in layers, with bread crumbs between, and little dots of butter; put the dish in a slow oven, and bake for half an hour or longer.

Sliced Baked Tomatoes. — Cut them in slices without removing the skin, and put about three layers in a deep pie plate; sprinkle on each layer pepper, salt, and bread crumbs, with butter on the crumbs; bake slowly for three hours.

Fried Tomatoes. — Cut them in slices, flour them well, and fry them slowly in the fat from fried pork.

Broiled Tomatoes. — Select large firm ones, and do not peel; slices half an inch thick, and broil upon an oyster gridiron; a few minutes will cook them; have ready in a cup some hot melted butter, seasoned with pepper, salt, a little sugar, and half a teaspoonful of made mustard; as soon as the tomatoes are done, dip each piece in the mixture, and lay on a hot chafing-dish; when all are dished, heat the rest of the sauce to a boil, pour upon them, and serve at once.

Raw Tomatoes. — Peel carefully with a sharp knife; slice and lay in a glass dish; dress with simple French dressing, with mayonnaise, with Duke of York's sauce, or with cold rovigatte. Tomatoes are excellent with any one of the three; but, perhaps, best of all, with a cream mayonnaise. Tomato salad should always be set on the ice for two or three hours before serving.

The Unrivalled Cook-book and Housekeeper's Guide MACARONI.

Home-made Macaroni (Neapolitan receipt). — Take some fine wheat flour and sift it carefully into a heap on your moulding-board; make a hole in the middle of the heap, and break into the hole one or two eggs, according to the quantity of flour; then, with the aid of a little warm water, work the flour and egg into a smooth, stiff paste; this done, proceed to roll out the paste with a rolling-pin, sprinkling a little sifted flour on each sheet; when you have rolled out all the paste into very thin sheets, cut each sheet with a paste-cutter into strips, stars, etc.; then put the paste for three or four hours in a cool, dry place. You may then use it for macaroni soup, macaroni vol au vent, etc. It is extremely delicate, and preferred by all Italian bon-vivants to bought macaroni.

Macaroni, Plain. — Put in an iron stewpan two quarts of water; allow it to boil; add two teaspoonfuls of salt and one ounce of butter, then add one pound of macaroni; boil till tender, but let it be rather firm to the touch; it is then ready for use, either in soup, pudding, or to be dressed with cheese. It should always be drained in a colander before using it.

Macaroni with Tomato Sauce. — Prepare the macaroni as above, drain on a colander, put into a hot dish, and pour over it a rich, thick tomato sauce.

Macaroni Stewed with Brown Gravy. — Prepare the macaroni as above. To prepare the sauce, cut a pound of absolutely lean beef into the smallest possible dice, and stew for two hours. The water should be cold when the meat is put in. At the end of the first half-hour add a pint of onions peeled, sliced, and lightly fried in butter; at the end of two hours strain, add a teaspoonful of caramel for browning and the same of browned flour, and pour over the macaroni.'

Macaroni with Liver. — Take equal quantities of chicken liver and calf's liver, and boil in water which has been very slightly salted; boil also with the liver an onion, a spoonful of mushroom powder, a bunch of sweet herbs, a glassful of marsala, a laurel leaf, also a little grated rind of lemon, and a pinch of burned sugar; when cooked rub the liver to a paste in a mortar, adding, little by little, enough melted butter to moisten it; work into it a teaspoonful of white pepper, half a grated nutmeg, a little cloves, and salt to taste; work all together thoroughly and smoothly; meanwhile have ready some cold boiled macaroni, butter a timbale mould, and line it with the macaroni and fill it with the liver, putting in also, at proper intervals, square and triangular bits of cold tongue, and some bits of the inside of the gizzard of fowls cut to imitate truffles; cover the timbale, and heat the macaroni and liver a, bain-marie for half an hour; turn out and serve hot.

Macaroni Baked with Cheese. — Put three ounces of macaroni into a pint of water when the water is bubbling, and boil until tender; then drain thoroughly, and put into a deep earthenware pie-dish in the following manner: Grate a quarter of a pound of good Parmesan cheese; put a layer of macaroni and a layer of cheese alternately until the dish is filled, taking care to sprinkle a soupcon of cayenne over each layer; then heat in a saucepan five tablespoonfuls of cream with a piece of butter the size of a walnut; when boiling pour this over the macaroni; then with two silver forks toss the whole mess together until thoroughly mixed; again dust the top with grated cheese, cover with a thick layer of bread crumbs dotted with little bits of fresh butter; put into a quick oven for ten minutes, and serve in the dish with a clean napkin pinned round it.

Jugged Macaroni. — Put two pounds of lean beef, entirely freed from skin and fat, into a jar with some macaroni (pipe macaroni is best for this purpose), an onion minced fine, a pint and a half of tomatoes peeled, sliced, and cored, two or three mushrooms, as many truffles in thin slices, the half of a small red-pepper pod, and two or three peppercorns. The jar should be well rubbed with garlic beforehand, and enough cold water poured in to barely cover the bottom of it; the meat should be cut into strips; Cook very slowly — the slower the better — d bainmarie, keeping the jar hermetically sealed ; the beef should cook for at least three hours before adding the vegetables; the vegetables again for two hours and a half or three before putting in the macaroni; the macaroni, of course, should cook until tender; serve with the sauce in which it has been cooked. The sauce should be strained through a colander.

Stuffed Macaroni. — Take large pipe macaroni (as large, if possible, as Italian bread); break it as nearly as possible into even lengths; then stuff each piece of macaroni with a mince composed of cold chicken chopped fine, some calves brain (which should previously have been boiled), some bread crumbs soaked in good stock, a little grated Parmesan cheese, two hard-boiled eggs chopped fine, and a little powdered parsley; cook the macaroni, when stuffed, for twenty minutes or longer in a little thin broth; pour some tomato sauce over it and serve.

Macaroni with Giblet Sauce. — Break the macaroni into two-inch lengths, and stew in boiling water until tender; prepare the giblet sauce beforehand; chop the giblets fine. and stew them in just broth enough to cover them until they are tender; when nearly cooked add a teacupful of strong stock thickened with browned flour; boil up once before serving, arrange the macaroni in the centre of the dish, and pour the giblet sauce (which should be as thick as a ragout) all round it; garnish with the round, unbroken yolks of twelve hard-boiled eggs. This is a very pretty dish, and is called by the Italians macaroni reale.

Macaroni d VAbeille. — One quarter of a pound of pipe macaroni, scalded until tender, and cut into pieces one third of an inch long.

Mince of every kind of cold meat, fowl, or game; add some ham chopped fine, some pepper, salt, a soupcon of cayenne, a teaspoonful of tomato catsup, and the same of Worcestershire sauce, and a tablespoonful of mixed chopped onion and sweet herbs; pour over the mince enough brown' gravy to moisten it well; butter a basin and line it completely with macaroni, sticking the pieces so closely together as to give the appearance of honeycomb; then fill with the mince, covering the top with macaroni; tie a pudding-cloth over the basin, and boil one hour if the basin is large; take it out of the water five minutes before turning it out of the mould, and serve with a strong brown gravy poured over it.

Macaroni d la Richelieu. — Three ounces of macaroni boiled until tender; two eggs beaten light; some cold veal and lean ham minced very fine; a pinch of pepper; a saltspoonful of sugar; a little grated lemon peel.

Mix the mince well and smoothly; then butter a melonshaped mould and line with the macaroni, fill up with the mince, and boil five minutes; turn out of the mould, and serve with good gravy poured over it.

Timbale of Macaroni and Chicken. — Butter a timbale mould well, sprinkle it with bread crumbs, and line with puff paste; fill with the following mixture: Some macaroni boiled in water with an ounce of butter; chicken skinned, boned, and fricasseed; half a pint of strong stock; a little grated Parmesan cheese. When the macaroni has boiled a few minutes, strain and return it to the pan; add the stock, boil it slowly on the stove until reduced, then put in the chicken and cheese, and toss until thoroughly heated; remove from the stove, and when cold pour into the timbale mould; cover and bake in a slow oven; turn out of the form and serve in the timbale of paste.

Macaroni a VAmalfi. — Butter a timbale form, and line it with half puff paste, very slightly sweetened; prepare the macaroni as directed in No. 1, and put it when cold into the timbale, dotting each layer with butter, and dusting it lightly with dried and grated ham; cover, and bake in a slow oven; turn out of the tin form, and serve in the timbale of paste; eat very hot.

Macaroni d la Sorrento. — Prepare the macaroni as directed in No. 1, but after draining return it to the pan and add four and a half ounces of grated cheese, a little butter, salt and pepper. In another saucepan have ready some small flat cakes made of boiled mush; toss these about until the macaroni is ready; arrange these cakes in a circle on a round dish; heap the macaroni in the middle, and pour the cheese and butter over all.

Tortelli alla Bolognese. — Take some home-made macaroni, made according to the foregoing receipt, but, instead of cutting it into strips, cut it into small squares, and put into the middle of each square a teaspoonful of mince; fold the square carefully, taking care that the sides overlap, so that there is no possibility of the tortello's bursting open; then drop into boiling broth, and cool for twenty minutes over a quick fire. They may be served in soup, or separately, in a dish, with tomato, giblet, or spinach sauce poured over them.

Tuscan Lambkins. — Cut some home-made macaroni into small squares as above; in the middle of each square put a spoonful of mince, made in the following manner: Chop very finely the white meat of some cold boiled chicken, and mix with it some bread crumbs soaked in cream, some calves' brain, boiled and chopped fine, a little powdered roasted parsley, a little boiled celery, two hard-boiled eggs, salt to taste, about two ounces grated Parmesan cheese, and a soujxon of nutmeg; chop all the ingredients fine,and mix smoothly together; fold the paste carefully round the mince, and drop each ball or square into boiling broth, and cook as above; meanwhile cook in another stewpan some onions chopped fine, some celery, a clove of garlic, a bunch of sweet herbs, and some butter; add a very little water, and stir continually; when nearly cooked, add a spoonful of brown flour, some tomatoes stewed and strained through a colander, and a pinch of burned sugar; arrange the "lambkins" in layers in a deep dish, pouring the sauce above mentioned over each layer, and sprinkling each layer also with grated Parmesan cheese; use abundance of both sance and cheese. These little "lambkins," if properly prepared, will be found very good.

Genoese Lasagne. — Take some home-made macaroni, cut into strips an inch wide and four inches long; cook in good broth, drain and arrange in a dish, pouring over them a sauce made of beef essence, thickened with grated fillet of beef, and finely chopped onion and celery; the fillet of beef, onions, and celery should be fried in butter to a light brown before adding them to the beef juice; the beef juice should heat d bain-marie, and the onions, fillet, and celery be dropped in boiling hot; the sauce thus prepared should be poured at once over the lasagne.

Panned Macaroni. — Take some home-made macaroni paste, and, after rolling it out as thin as possible, cut into strips about a quarter of an inch wide; set away to dry for four or five hours, and then drop into boiling water, slightly salted; cook fifteen or twenty minutes; have ready a large, wide, and very shallow earthen dish ; butter this dish, and line completely with finely relled and browned bread crumbs; cover with a layer of macaroni. If the dish be so shallow that it will only admit of one thick layer of macaroni, so much the better; stick little bits of fresh butter among the macaroni, cover with a layer of rolled bread crumbs and grated Sardinian cheese, and brown in a quick oven.

SALADS.

Rules for Salad Dressing. — "The dressing of the salad should be saturated with oil, and seasoned with pepper and salt before the vinegar is added. It results from this process that there never can be too much vinegar; for, from the specific gravity of the vinegar compared with oil, what is more than useful will fall to the bottom of the bowl. The salt should not be dissolved in the vinegar, but in the oil, by which means it is more equally distributed throughout the salad" (Chaptal, a French chemist). The Spanish proverb says: "A spendthrift for oil, a niggard for vinegar, a wise man for salt, and a madman to mix the whole together."

Mayonnaise. — The yolks of two raw eggs; fine oil of Lucca enough to work the mayonnaise to a cream; salt to taste; mustard to taste; vinegar to taste; a tiny — the very tiniest — pinch of powdered sugar.

Break the eggs very carefully, and put the yolks into a shallow dish; then add the oil drop by drop, stirring steadily one way with a wooden or silver fork; then add the salt, then the mustard and sugar, and last of all the vinegar, drop by drop. The stirring should go on all the time without intermission or change of direction, and the mayonnaise, when finished, should be of the consistency and smoothness of the richest fresh cream. Lemon juice may be substituted for vinegar.

Cream Mayonnaise. — Take of rich, fresh, thick cream one pint — one half plain, one half whipped light; the yolks of four hard-boiled eggs; one teaspoonful of salt; one teaspoonful of made mustard; one teaspoonful of white pepper; two teaspoonf uls of white powdered sugar; one teaspoonful of roasted powdered parsley; four teaspoonfuls of lemon juice.

Rub the yolks of the eggs to a fine powder, then add the salt, pepper, and sugar, grinding them hard and rubbing all smoothly together; then work in the plain cream drop by drop, then the mustard, then the whipped cream and parsley, and, lastly, the lemon juice, which must be whipped in, a few drops at a time.

Sydney Smith's Receipt for Salad Dressing. —

"Two boiled potatoes, strained through the kitchen sieve, Softness and smoothness to the salad give. Of mordant mustard take a single spoon; Distrust the condiment that bites too soon, Yet deem it not, thou man of taste, a fault To add a double quantity of salt. Four times the spoon with oil of Lucca crown, And twice with vinegar procured from town. True taste requires it, and your poet begs The pounded yellow of two well-boiled eggs. Let onion's atoms lurk within the bowl, And, scarce suspected, animate the whole. And, lastly, in the flavored compound toss A magic spoonful of anchovy sauce. Oh, great and glorious! oh, herbaceous meat! Twould tempt the dying anchorite to eat. Back to the world he'd turn his weary soul, And plunge his fingers in the salad-bowl."

Russian Salad. — Boil some carrots and turnips in salted water with a small piece of butter, but do not let them be overdone. When cold, cut out of them with a vegetable scoop a number of pieces the size of an olive; cut some beetroot in the same way, likewise some truffles and pickled mushrooms; have ready some cold boiled potatoes prepared in the same way, some green pease, some haricot beans (cooked), some string beans, some asparagus points, and one or two button onions (also cooked); take equal parts of all these (except the onions), two tablespoonfuls of capers, two tablespoonfuls of pickled gherkins, two tablespoonfuls of anchovies or sardines, washed clean, skinned, and boned; two dozen olives, stoned; one tablespoonful of tarragon and chervil, and one teaspoonful of chives. Hub a dish with garlic, and arrange the vegetables, fish, olives, pickles, etc., symmetrically in it; sprinkle over it a very little roasted parsley; then make a dressing of olive-oil, vinegar, raw yolks of eggs, pepper, salt, and the herbs above mentioned, worked smoothly together. (See " Mayonnaise.") Ornament with hard-boiled eggs, lobster spawn, caviare, pickles, truffles, etc., and with Spanish capsicums (Piementes dulces) — a great addition on account of their exquisite color and flavor.

Dutch Salad. — Wash, split, and bone a dozen anchovies, and roll each one up; wash, split and bone one herring, and cut it up into small pieces; cut up into dice an equal quantity of Bologna or Lyons sausage, or of smoked ham and sausage; also, an equal quantity of the breast of cold roast fowl or cold veal; add likewise, always in the same quantity and cut into dice, beetroot, pickled cucumbers, cold boiled potatoes, cut in larger dice, and in quantity according to taste, but at least thrice as much potato as anything else; add a tablespoonful of capers, the yolks and whites of some hard-boiled eggs, minced separately, and a dozen stoned olives; mix all the ingredients well together, reserving the olives and anchovies to ornament the top of the bowl; beat up together oil and tarragon vinegar with white pepper and French mustard to taste; pour this over the salad and serve.

Dutch Salad. — Thoroughly wash four soft-roed bloaters, remove the bones and skin, and put the roes aside; arrange the four fillets of each fish neatly round the dish; chop finely and separately the whites and yolks of two hard-boiled eggs; also, some parsley, some shallot or parboiled onion, and some pickled beetroot, keeping each separate; lay these different things in some sort of pattern in the centre of the dish; take the roes and mash them with a silver or wooden spoon, adding enough oil and vinegar to make a thickish sauce; pepper to taste, and pour evenly over the herring fillets.

Pickled Bloaters. — Take a dozen bloaters; wash them thoroughly; drain dry, skin, and bone them, and lay them in enough good milk to completely cover them. When they have lain in this for twenty-four hours, drain them thoroughly, and lay them in a pie-dish with half a dozen slices of lemon and the same quantity of Spanish and Portugal onion, four bay-leaves, two ounces of capers, a. dozen cloves, eighteen peppercorns, and as much oil and vinegar, in equal proportions, as will completely cover the herrings. Lay them in a cool place until wanted.

Artichoke Salad. — Choose fine, fresh artichokes, not too large, and boil them whole, adding a little essence of spinach to preserve their green color; when quite tender, drain, arrange in a dish, and set away to cool; prepare a simple dressing of oil, vinegar, pepper, and salt; serve the artichokes quite cold, and the dressing in a sauce-boat.

Beet Salad. — Choose small, young beets, pink and white; boil until tender, set away to cool, and serve cold, with a creamy mayonnaise poured over them. This is a delicious salad, and is much prettier if the beets are s<>> young that they can be served whole. Arrange in a pyramid in alternate stripes of pink and white.

Blakely Egg Mayonnaise. — Boil hard one dozen and a half of eggs; throw them into cold water; peel them carefully, and cut each egg in two crosswise; take all the yolks, mash them, season with salt, plenty of red pepper, celery chopped fine, grated eschalottes, horseradish scraped very fine, mango pickles chopped, and moisten it all with olive-oil; stuff the whites of the eggs with this, make a mayonnaise dressing, arrange the stuffed eggs on a dish with bunches of lettuce-hearts, and garnish with the mayonnaise dressing.

Potato and Herring Salad. — Boil some potatoes unpeeled; when cold cut them in slices, or with a potatocutter into tiny balls; peel and cut also into balls two sour apples, some pickled cucumbers, and one or two salt herrings, which must previously have been boned; put the potatoes into a salad bowl and salt and pepper them lightly; then dress with oil and a very little vinegar; add the herrings, apples, cucumbers, a tablespoonful of chopped onions, and, last of all, some pickled beets; stir all the ingredients well together, and serve.

Plain Potato Salad. — Peel some cold boiled potatoes and slice fine; rub a salad bowl with garlic, and put in the potatoes; dress them with salt, white pepper, oil, and vinegar, and add, last of all, a tablespoonful of onion chopped fine, and the same quantity of roasted powdered parsley.

Coleslaw. — Choose a firm white cabbage and shred it fine; do not chop it; pour over it Philadelphia sauce for Coleslaw No. 1 or 2; the sauce must be poured boiling hot over the slaw, which must then be set away to cool; eat cold.

Baked-Bean Salad. — Put some cold baked beans in a salad bowl, and dress with vinegar, white pepper, salt, a tablespoonful of brown sugar, and a soupcon of oil.

String-Bean Salad. — Boil some string beans until tender in salt and water; when cold arrange in a salad bowl which has been rubbed with garlic; dress with salt, pepper, oil (plenty of it), and lemon juice in lieu of vinegar.

Lettuce Salad. — Pull the lettuce to pieces with your fingers, arrange in a salad bowl, and dress with salt, pepper, oil, and vinegar; toss with two wooden forks until every leaf is thoroughly dressed.

Or, you may use a mayonnaise dressing.

Celery Salad. — Wash and scrape the celery, and cut into bits half an inch long; have ready some good mayonnaise and pour over the celery; eat at once.

Tomato Salad. — Twelve medium-sized tomatoes peeled and sliced; one button onion chopped fine; a mayonnaise made of the yolks of six raw eggs and oil in proportion, two teaspoonf uls of made mustard, one teaspoon fill of salt, two teaspoonfuls of cayenne pepper, the same of sugar, and vinegar to taste.

Set the salad dish on the ice while you prepare the mayonnaise, which should be rich and thick as cream; pour the mayonnaise on the tomatoes, and leave all on the ice for fifteen minutes longer; then serve.

Or, you may use the cream mayonnaise, which is delicious for tomatoes.

Cucumber Salad. — Choose fresh, ripe cucumbers; pare, slice very thin, and lay in ice-water for an hour; then put into a dish rubbed with garlic, and dress with oil, vinegar, pepper, and salt; lay a piece of ice in the dish, and serve.

Mixed Summer Salad (" Common-Sense in the Household"). — Three heads of lettuce; two teaspoonfuls of green mustard leaves; a handful of water-cresses; five tender radishes; one cucumber; three hard-boiled eggs; two teaspoonfuls of white sugar; one teaspoonful of salt; one teaspoonful of pepper; one teaspoonful of made mustard; one teacupfnl of vinegar; half a teacupf ul of oil.

Mix all well together, and serve with a lump of ice in the middle.

Watercress Salad. — Wash and pick carefully, pull to pieces, and dress with vinegar, oil, pepper, and salt.

Chicken Salad. — The white meat of cold boiled chicken or turkey; three quarters of the same bulk of chopped celery; a rich mayonnaise.

Chop the meat fine, removing every scrap of fat, gristle, and skin; mix carefully with the celery, and set in a cold place while you mix the mayonnaise. Be sure to make enough mayonnaise, not only to mix thoroughly with the chicken, but to lie on the top; garnish with a wreath of lettuce hearts, hard-boiled eggs, pickled cucumbers and beets cut into shape.

Lobster Salad. — Pick out every bit of meat from the body and claws of a cold boiled lobster; lay aside the coral for the dressing; when the lobster is finely minced, make a rich mayonnaise dressing; mix the lobster coral with it to give it a fine color; then mix well and thoroughly with the lobster, adding at the last moment some fresh, crisp lettuce leaves; cover the lobster with a thick layer of mayonnaise, and garnish with lettuce hearts and small boiled shrimps and prawns.

Salmon Salad. — Mince some cold boiled salmon finely, and cut the rest into well-shaped fillets of even size; lay these in a bath of oil and vinegar; mix some mayonnaise smoothly with the minced salmon, shape into a pyramid, and lay the fillets upright against the pyramid, filling up the interstices between the fillets with pickled cucumbers, beets, and hard-boiled eggs cut into pretty shapes.

Serve cucumbers with salmon mayonnaise, and use in preference the cream mayonnaise for dressing cold salmon.

Cheese Salad will be found under the head of "Cheese."

Parisienne Salad. — Cut into thin slices a red beet baked in the oven, also some boiled celery, and an equal quantity of boiled potatoes; put all into a salad bowl with some grated horseradish, and dress with oil and vinegar; press the yolks of five hard-boiled eggs through a sieve, add two teaspoonfuls of puree of anchovies, and half a tumblerful of oil of Lucca; work all smoothly together with a wooden spoon; then add a teaspoonf ul of good mustard, a little tarragon vinegar, four teaspoonfuls of pickled tunny cut into dice, as many of pickled cucumbers cut into dice, a pinch of cayenne, two teaspoonfuls of the white of egg, cut into dice, a pinch of chopped tarragon, then the vegetables chopped fine and drained; mix all together and put into the salad bowl.

Truffle Salad d la Toulousaine. — Peel and slice very finely six black truffles; when sliced put them in a covered jar; take some young, fresh artichokes, pull off the hard outer leaves, and slice the inner and tenderer ones finely; let them stand for ten minutes with a little salt, then brush off the salt; pass the yolks of three hard-boiled eggs through a sieve; mix with them a little mustard, half a glassful of the finest oil of Lucca, and some good tarragon vinegar; rub a salad bowl with a clove of garlic, and arrange in it the truffles and artichokes in alternate layers, seasoning them lightly with a very little salt and pepper, and with a little of the dressing; let all stand ten minutes, then pour in the rest of the dressing, and toss the salad with two wooden forks until it is thoroughly assimilated.

Black, Truffle Salad d la Russe. — Peel some raw truffles, put them into a shallow saucepan with a little Madeira, salt slightly, and cook four minutes; then chop them,put them into a deep dish, season them, and pour on a little oil; cover, and let them soak for ten minutes; then dust with a pinch each of tarragon, of parsley, and of chives, chopped fine, and add several spoonfuls of mayonnaise; mix well, arrange in a shallow dish, and cover with a thick layer of mayonnaise.

Mamies Coleslaw. — Cut a fine, crisp white cabbage into fine shreds, and make a sauce as follows: The yolks of two eggs, a piece of butter the size of a walnut, two tablespoonf uls of thick cream, two tablespoonf uls of the best vinegar. Beat eggs, butter, and vinegar together, with pepper and salt to taste; then heat in a small saucepan, stirring all the time; do not let it boil; when smooth and thick remove from the fire, pour into a bowl, and set in a cool place; when cool beat in the cream, pour over the cabbage, and toss with two silver forks.

Cauliflower Slaw. — Cut some cold boiled cauliflower into small flowers, and pour over the sauce above described. It is very good.

Marian Sauce (" Common-Sense in the Household "). — Five tablespoonfnls of fresh butter; a teacupful of vinegar; salt and pepper to taste, with a heaping teaspoonful of white sugar; one teaspoonful of made mustard; one tablespoonful of roast parsley.

Beat the butter to a cream, adding gradually the vinegar, salt, and pepper, then the parsley, sugar, and mustard; the butter should be light as whipped egg; send to table red-hot.

Philadelphia Sauce for Coleslaw, No. 1. — One cupful of vinegar; one tablespoonful of butter; one tablespoonful of sugar; two tablespoonf uls of sour cream; a pinch of pepper, and the same of salt.

Put the vinegar, with all the ingredients for the dressing except the cream, into a porcelain-lined saucepan, and let them come to a boil; pour scalding hot over the slaw and set away until quite cold; just before serving add the cream, beating it in with a silver fork. This preparation of coleslaw is very nice and digestible.

Philadelphia Sauce for Coleslaw, No. 2. — One pint of the best milk; one piece of butter half the size of an egg; two eggs, yolks only; one tablespoonful of the best vinegar.

Put all the ingredients into a porcelain-lined saucepan, and stir steadily until the butter melts and the sauce thickens; do not allow it to boil; pour boiling hot over the slaw, which must previously have been cut to the finest possible shreds and duly salted; eat cold.

CHEESE.

Cheese Salad (Mock Crab) (" Common - Sense in the Household"). — Half a pound of pickled shrimps; a quarter of a pound of good old cheese; one tablespponful of salad oil; one teaspoonful of cayenne pepper; one teaspoonful of salt; one teaspoonful of white sugar; one teaspoonful of made mustard; four tablespoonfuls of celery or onion vinegar.

Mince the shrimps and grate the cheese; work into the latter, a little at a time, the various condiments enumerated above, the vinegar last; let all stand together ten minutes before adding the shrimps; when this is done, stir well for a minute, and serve in crab or scallop shells.

Cheese Devils. — Half a pound of old cheese, grated; one hard-boiled egg; one teacupf nl of minced chicken ; one teaspoonful of cayenne pepper; one teaspoonful of salt; one teaspoonful of white sugar; one teaspoonful of made mustard ; one tablespoonful of onion vinegar; one tablespoonful of salad oil or melted butter.

Rub the yolk of the egg to a paste with the oil, adding in order the salt, pepper, sugar, mustard, and cheese; lastly, the chicken; serve in crab or scallop shells.

Parmesan Fondue (Brillat Savarin). — Melt half an ounce of fresh butter into a saucepan, stir into it a tablespoonful of flour; when the two are well amalgamated. put in a small quantity of milk and about three ounces of grated Parmesan cheese; stir the mixture on a slow fire until it assumes the appearance of thick cream, but be careful not to let it boil; then add one clove of garlic, a small quantity of flour of mustard, a soupcon of powdered nutmeg, and some white pepper; mix thoroughly, and,if required, add a little salt; keep on stirring the mixture at a very moderate heat for about ten minutes, then remove the clove of garlic; take the saucepan off the fire, and stir the contents occasionally until quite cold; then stir into it the yolks of three eggs beaten up with a little milk and strained, and finally the whites of five eggs beaten to a stiff froth; pour the mixture into a deep round tin; set it in the oven (which must not be too hot); in about twenty or thirty minutes the fondue will have risen and taken color; pin a napkin round it, and serve quickly.

Welsh Rarebit of Cheese d la Braine. — This dish must be made on the table, in the dining-room, and in presence of the guests, as the delay of a moment is fatal to its excellence; have ready some old Dutch or double Gloucestershire cheese, not too hard; cut off the rind and put into a silver chafing-dish, with one quarter the quantity of butter; stir continually, and as it melts add more butter, the proportion being one third as much butter as cheese; when it begins to boil, add mustard and pepper to taste, and a soupcon of onion or celery vinegar; meanwhile some white bread must have been toasted on both sides, and must be handed round to the guests hot, when the rarebit begins to boil; each guest should butter his toast quickly on both sides, and the plates must be passed rapidly to the cook in chief, who will pour the boiling rarebit over the toast. Pale ale should be taken with it; a little poured over the rarebit is an improvement.

Cheese Aigrettes. — Three ounces of grated Parmesan cheese; two ounces of butter; two ounces of finest sifted flour, yolks of three eggs, and whites of two (beaten to a stiff froth), and a half-pint of water.

Boil the water and butter together; stir the flour into this, continuing gently until it is cooked (i. e., when it thickens); remove saucepan from fire, and throw one third quantity of cheese into the mixture; stir, and add one egg; mix and beat all together, then add more cheese and another egg, etc.; when all are mixed together, the compound must be beaten thoroughly until very light; spread it on plates to cool; when cold, it should be quite set; fry in boiling lard, dropping in a tablespoonful at a time; in frying, they swell and gape before they are ready.

Cheese Souffle. — Melt half an ounce of fresh butter in a saucepan; stir in one tablespoonful of flour; when well amalgamated, put in a small quantity of milk and three ounces of grated Parmesan cheese; stir over a slow fire till like thick cream, but do not let it boil; add white pepper and a tiny pinch of salt; keep on stirring the mixture at a moderate heat for ten minutes; take the saucepan from the fire, and stir the contents until cold, then stir in the yolks of three eggs, beaten up with milk and strained, and finally the whites of five eggs beaten to a stiff froth; fill some papers with the mixture, and bake for from ten to fifteen minutes.

Piedmontese Cheese Sticks. — Take some Italian bread (the slender brown sticks known in Tuscany as pone Piemontese); cut it into even lengths and brown quickly; have ready some melted butter, and dip the bread quickly in it; allow it to cool again, and in the meantime prepare in a saucepan some grated Parmesan cheese, a little butter and cream; add a SQupgon of onions, salt, and pepper to taste; allow this to come to the consistency of thick cream, and proceed to fill the Piedmontese bread in the following manner: Wrap one end of the stick in white paper, and, placing it on end, fill it with the cheese, cream, which may be poured in through a tiny paper funnel; when all are filled and cold roll them in beaten white of egg, and afterwards in finely rolled bread crumbs, delicately browned, and mingled with equal parts of roasted powdered parsley; 237

remove the paper caps, and egg and bread-crumb the ends. This is an extremely pretty and savory dish.

Cheese Scallop. — Soak a small cupful of stale browned bread crumbs in fresh milk; beat into this one large egg, a teaspoonf nl of melted butter, three ounces of grated Parmesan cheese; pepper and salt to taste; strew bread crumbs over all, and bake in scallop shells to a delicate brown.

Hamdkins of Cheese. — Scrape a quarter of a pound each of Cheshire and Gloucestershire cheese and good fresh butter; pound all in a mortar with the yolks of four eggs and the inside of a small French roll boiled in cream until eoft; mix this paste with a wineglassfnl of white wine and the whites of the eggs, which should be beaten as light as possible; fill small oblong paper pans, and bake in a Dutch oven until of a fine brown; send to table red-hot; the batter for ramakins is equally good over macaroni when boiled tender, or on stewed broccoli, celery, or cauliflower; a little of the gravy they have been stewed in being put in the dish.

Potted Cheese, No. 1. — One pound of Cheshire cheese, and one of Gloucestershire; three tablespoonfuls of mountain wine, and two of made mustard; pound all together in a marble mortar, and then pack it into small jars for use.

Potted Cheese, No. 2. — Four ounces of Cheshire cheese, cut and pounded; one and a half ounces of best butter; one teaspoonf ul of white powdered sugar, a little bit of mace, and a glassful of white wine.

Mix all smoothly together, and press down into a deep pot.

Roasted Cheese, Dutch Receipt. — Three ounces of fat Cheshire cheese grated, mixed with the beaten yolks of two eggs, four ounces of grated bread, and three ounces of butter.

Beat smooth in a mortar, with a dessertspoonful of mustard, and salt and pepper; spread very thickly upon squares of toasted bread; put into a Dutch oven, covered with a dish until hot through; remove the dish, and brown; serve blazing hot.

Cheese Stirabout (Soyer). — Nearly fill an iron pot with water; throw in three tablespoonfuls of salt; when boiling, throw in by degrees some sifted Indian meal, in the proportion of one pound to every two quarts of water; when well stirred, remove the husk which floats on top, then throw in one pound of strong cheese, grated; boil twenty minutes and serve.

Cheese Rolls (Soyer). — Take some nice French rolls; cut off a piece of the crust, and pull out with a fork as much as possible of the inside without spoiling the shape of the roll; fill up with Welsh rarebit; put the top on and serve. This is an excellent picnic dish, as the rolls are good cold.

Irish Rarebit (Soyer). — Four ounces of strong cheese; one ounce of butter; one gherkin chopped fine; mustard, pepper, and salt to taste.

Heat altogether; pour hot over rounds of toast; put in the oven five minutes, and serve hot.

Cheese Straws, No. 1. — Make some sheets of the finest puff paste; roll them out very thin; sprinkle lightly with salt and cayenne pepper; then lay one on top of the other, and roll out again and again until the paste is nearly as thin as tissue paper, and is evenly salted and peppered; cut then with a paste-cutter into tiny strips or straws about four inches long; lay on buttered paper, and bake quickly; arrange in a square pile like straws, and serve as cheese with olives.

Cheese Straws, No. 2. — Quarter of a pound of finest white flour, sifted; two ounces of good butter; two ounces of Parmesan cheese, grated ; two ounces of common cheese, grated; a pinch of cayenne pepper.

Mix flour and butter well and smoothly together; add the cheese and cayenne; work well; roll out as for puff paste; cut in narrow strips, and bake.

Samequins de Dijon. — Half a tumbler of water; one pinch of salt; one pinch of white pepper; half a coffeespoonful of sugar; four to five ounces of fresh butter; half a pound of finest white flour, sifted; four ounces of fresh Gruyere cheese, chopped fine ; five eggs, well beaten.

Put the water, butter, sugar, salt, and pepper into a casserole; when the mixture boils, withdraw it from the fire, and add the flour gradually; replace the casserole on the fire; have it on the fire a few moments, stirring all the time; then pour into another casserole, and add, little by little, the eggs and the cheese, stirring steadily; when the batter is stiff take out a dessertspoonful at'a time, and arrange in little ovals on a buttered baking dish; glaze the ramequins with beaten white of egg; place on each a small slice of Gruyere, cut in the form of a lozenge, and bake in a quick oven.

EGGS.

Eggs, to Choose. — Try the eggs in a pan of cold water. The freshest sink first; those that float are to be rejected. Or, shake the egg gently at your ear. If you hear a gungle or thud the egg is bad.

Eggs should be kept in a cool place. If you wish to keep them for weeks, grease with linseed-oil, and pack in bran or coarse salt, with the small end downwards.

Boiled Eggs. — Put into a saucepan of boiling water with a tablespoon, and boil steadily three minutes for soft eggs, ten for hard.

Or, put them on in cold water, and boil ten minutes; they will be then of the consistency of cream; serve in a folded napkin.

Poached Eggs. — Strain some boiling water into a perfectly clean saucepan; when the water boils, break the eggs separately into a saucer, and slide each egg carefully upon the surface of the water (first removing the saucepan from the fire); when all the eggs are in, return the saucepan to the fire, and boil gently three minutes; have some rounds of buttered toast in a hot dish; remove the eggs from the saucepan with a perforated skimmer, drain, and lay on the toast; dust lightly with salt and white pepper, and serve.

Poached Eggs d la Crime (" Common-Sertse in the Household "). — Poach as above, adding, however, a tablespoonful of strained vinegar, and a pinch of salt to the water. Prepare a sauce with one teacupful of chicken broth, half a teacupful of cream, and one spoonful of butter. Let it heat to a boil, stirring constantly; then add butter, pepper, and salt to taste; boil up once, and pour over the eggs and toast; dust lightly with powdered parsley, and serve.

Baked Eggs. — Butter a deep dish, and break in six or more eggs very carefully; place a piece of fresh butter on each egg; dust lightly with salt and pepper; bake in the oven until the whites are set.

Scalloped Eggs. — Butter some scallop shells, and half fill with a forcemeat made of equal parts of ground ham, cold chicken, and bread crumbs; season with pepper and salt, and moisten with melted butter; break an egg carefully on the top of each, dust with pepper and salt, and sift with finely grated bread crumbs; set in the oven and bake eight minutes. These are equally good made with dried beef grated, mixed with the yolk of hardboiled egg rubbed to a powder. If you use the beef omit the chicken.

Scrambled Eggs. — Put a good-sized piece of butter in a frying-pan, and when it is hot drop in the eggs and stir continually until they are cooked, which will be in about three minutes; turn out on a hot dish, and eat at once.

Stirred Eggs on Mounds. — Cut (with a cake-cutter) some white bread into rounds, toast on both sides, butter carefully, and heap with ground ham, grated dried beef, or minced chicken; then put a lump of butter into a frying-pan, and when it is hot stir in four or five well-beaten eggs, with pepper, salt, and a little powdered parsley; stir and toss for five minutes, then heap on the mounds, and serve.

Egg Baskets. — Boil some eggs hard, cut them neatly in half lengthwise, and extract the yolks; rub these to a paste, and mix with some cold fowl or ham chopped fine; mix smoothly together with melted butter; then fill the hollowed whites with the mixture, arrange neatly in a very hot dish, and pour over them a rich gravy.

Or, you can serve them cold with mayonnaise sauce.

Soft Eggs with Anchovy Butter. — Choose eight large eggs, drop them carefully into hot water, and boil five minutes in a covered saucepan; drain and drop into cold water in which they may grow cold; then remove the shell carefully, taking care not to break the whites; drop the eggs again into hot water, leaving them just long enough to heat them; then arrange them in a hot dish, and pour over them a sauce of melted butter thickened with anchovy paste.

Eggs with Tomato Sauce. — Fry some eggs as round as balls; then arrange them in a pyramid on a very hot dish, and pour over them a rich tomato sauce; dust thickly with fried bread crumbs, and serve.

Eggs d la Parisienne. — Glaze some small moulds with a little good stock, and dust with fresh truffles chopped to the finest possible mince; then break a fresh egg into each mould, dust with pepper and salt, and bake in the oven for six or seven minutes; then turn out the moulds on a very hot dish, pour over them some lobster or shrimp sauce, and serve.

Farcied Eggs. — Boil eight or ten eggs hard, cut them in half lengthwise, and rub the yolks to a powder; work this to a paste with a little bread crumb, some anchovies pounded fine, and some melted butter, also a handful of fine herbs chopped to powder, and the yolks of one or two raw eggs; season the whole with pepper and salt, and stuff the whites of the eggs; then join them carefully, roll the egg first in beaten egg, then in bread crumbs, and fry them; arrange in a pyramid, and garnish with fried parsley.

Eggs d la Moutglas, — Boil some eggs for five minutes, then drop them into cold water; twenty minutes afterwards drain them, remove the shells, and with a tube take out the yolks; fill the hollows with a moutglas, or fine mince, composed of chicken breast, scarlet tongue, and truffles, and bind with a little good sauce or stock; close the opening, roll the eggs in beaten egg, and then in bread crumbs, and fry quickly.

Jumbled Eggs with Shrimps. — Take four tablespoonf uls of cooked shrimps skinned and chopped; pound the skins or shells to the finest possible powder, and rub smooth with some fresh butter; then butter the bottom of a frying-pan, break eight eggs into a dish, beat very light, and season with salt, pepper, and a sowpgon of cayenne; pour the eggs into a buttered frying-pan, put the pan on the fire, and stir the eggs continually with a wooden spoon; when they begin to harden, withdraw the pan from the fire and add (still stirring) two teaspoonfuls of rich cream, and the red butter cut into dice; return the pan to the fire, and two minutes later add the chopped shrimps; stir, and pour into a hot dish.

Plover's Eggs in a Nest of Butter. — Test plover's as you would hen's eggs. If they are fresh, put eighteen or more carefully into a saucepan, cover with cold water, and cook slowly for eight or ten minutes; then drain and drop into cold water. Meanwhile make some cornucopias of paper, fill them with soft, fresh butter, and press out the butter through the small end; the butter will issue from this hole in a long, thin strip; proceed in this way to form an imitation bird's nest on the border of a round plate; within this nest of butter arrange a pile of water-cresses, and put the eggs on this, so placing them as to form a pyramid; put the dish on ice until you are ready to serve it.

Breaded Eggs. — Boil some eggs hard, remove the shells, and cut into thick slices; dip each slice in beaten egg, and then in rolled bread crumbs, and fry quickly in boiling lard; garnish with fried parsley, and serve.

Eggs au Lit. — Mince some cold corned beef, ham, or fowl very fine, and add two beaten eggs and some melted butter, pepper, salt, and minced parsley; warm in a frying-pan, stirring and tossing continually; when thoroughly heated through arrange in a thick layer on an oval dish, and place on the mince as many poached eggs as they will hold; dust with pepper and salt, and surround the base of the mound with triangles of fried bread. This is simpler and equally good if the mince be composed only of equal quantities of cold corned beef and boiled potatoes.

Fricasseed Eggs. — Prepare some stuffed eggs as directed in any of the foregoing receipts, but cutting the eggs differently — that is, taking a slice off the top, which you may replace when you have filled the egg; then arrange the stuffed eggs in a very hot dish, dust them thickly with roasted powdered parsley and fried bread crumbs, and then pour over them a sauce made in the following manner: Two cups uls of strong veal or chicken broth, six tablespoonfuls of rich, fresh cream, salt and pepper to taste. Boil up, pour smoking hot over the eggs, let them stand five minutes closely covered, and send to table.

Eggs Fried as Round as Balls (receipt of 1794). — Have a very deep frying-pan with three pints of clarified butter; heat the butter hot, as for fritters, and stir it with a stick until it runs round like a whirlpool; break an egg in the middle, and turn it round with your stick until it is as hard as a poached egg. The whirling round of the butter will make it as round as a ball. Then take it up with a skimmer, and put it into a dish before the fire. They will keep hot half an hour, and yet be soft; s0 you may do as many as you please. Eggs may be poached round in boiling water in the same manner.

Eggs Roasted in their Shells. — To be properly roasted, eggs should be roasted in sand. This, of course, is easily done out-of-doors, but may be imitated in-doors by having a deep pan filled with sand, placed on the range, or, better still, in the oven. When the sand is thoroughly heated through, put a shovelful of red-hot wood coals on the sand, set the pan on the range, and after a few moments scrape the embers aside and some of the surface sand; have the eggs pricked in the small end by a pin or sharp-pointed penknife to prevent bursting; set each egg on end in the hot sand, and cover them with leaves, and then with the hot sand and embers; roast eight minutes. They will be as smooth as velvet.

Pickled Eggs. — Boil the eggs until they become perfectly hard; then remove the shells and lay them carefully in a large-mouthed jar; pour over them boiling vinegar well seasoned with salt, peppercorns, allspice, mace, ginger, cayenne, mustard seed, a few cloves of garlic, and a tablespoonful of curry; when cold fasten the mouth of the jar very closely. In a month they will be fit for use.

Pannikins. — Take some little earthen pans, such as are sold for toy milkpans, capable of holding one egg only; heat them in the oven, and when quite hot take them out, and with a pastebrush butter them inside; break an egg carefully into each pan; set them in the oven until the white of the egg is hard enough to retain the form of the pan; turn them' out in a circle on the dish in which they are to be served; on the top of each sprinkle a little fresh parsley or grated ham; have ready a sance of bread crumbs, beaten up with rich gravy, browned and seasoned; place this in the middle of the dish, the eggs enclosing it.

Wisconsin Eggs. — Beat twelve eggs well, and add two tablespoonfuls of cream and some salt; have a lump of butter boiling in the frying-pan, and pour the mixture into it; as fast as the egg cooks at the bottom, slip a knife under, tilting the pan a little so as to let the raw egg run towards the butter; when it forms a little, cut it in pieces as you would a pie, so that the uncooked egg runs over the edges, for it must be cooked only on one side; when done, add black pepper. This will fill a large dish.

Puffed Eggs (Italian monastery). — Twelve eggs; the yolks whole; the whites beaten to the stiffest possible froth. .

Put a sufficient piece of butter in a frying-pan, and when it is melted and slightly browned put in the yolk of one egg; do this carefully, so as not to break the yolk; immediately cover the yolk with a heaping spoonful of the beaten whites; when cooked, remove the eggs with a perforated ladle, put them on a hot plate, and pour over them a sauce piquante.

Eggs al Piatto. — Six eggs beaten very light, yolks and whites together; six slices of bread cut round and toasted on both sides; some fresh cottage cheese.

Put a piece of butter into a frying-pan, and when it is quite melted put in the pieces of toast, spread thickly with cottage cheese; pour over them immediately the beaten egg, and the moment the egg browns transfer the piatti to a hot plate; sprinkle them with browned bread crumbs, and serve.

Eggs d la Vallombrosa. — Six eggs boiled hard and cut in half; the yolks of four eggs beaten very light; three button onions sliced fine; half a tumbler of fresh cream; two tablespoonfuls of roasted parsley powdered fine; salt and pepper to taste; a pinch of grated nutmeg; half a coffeecupful of browned and rolled bread crumbs.

Put a good-sized piece of butter into a porcelain-lined stewpan with the button onions; when the onions are nicely browned, add the cream, stirring all the time; then drop in the hard-boiled eggs, and one minute later the beaten yolks; sift the parsley in carefully, stirring all the time; then the nutmeg and the seasoning; serve on a very hot dish, and squeeze some lemon-juice over the vallombrose before sending it to table.

Eggs with Truffles. — Stew some finely sliced truffles with a little butter and milk; have ready some good ham, sliced as thinly as possible and freed from fat; fry the ham in butter, and when crooked put it on the plate in which you intend to serve the eggs (a strong earthenware plate is best), pouring over it a tablespoonful of good stock and the same quantity of white wine; put the plate on an iron tripod over the fire, and when the sauce begins to boil break the eggs very carefully; the moment the eggs are cooked, take the plate from the tripod, pour the truffle sauce over the eggs, and serve.

Snow Eggs — The whites of eight eggs beaten to the stiffest possible froth; the yolks the same; one pint of fresh milk flavored with orange-flower water and a little grated rind of lemon; powdered sugar to taste, beaten into the whites of the eggs.

Boil the milk, adding the flavoring when the milk is scalding-hot; when the milk is boiling, drop in the whites in large spoonfuls, turning them over carefully to facilitate their swelling; when they are cooked, pile the balls of snow into a dish and set aside; strain the milk through a sieve, sweeten to taste, and pour it on the beaten yolks; return the saucepan to the fire, stirring the mixture continually until it assumes the consistency of cream; then withdraw it from the fire, and pour the custard over the snow pyramid; eat hot or cold to taste.

Spanish Gold Foam. — The yolks of six eggs, beaten up with as much cold water as the six eggshells will contain; sugar and flavoring to taste.

Cook over a slow fire, stirring continually, and never allowing the liquid to boil; when it thickens take it from the fire and allow it to cool; when cold beat hard for an hour; serve in custard-cups.

Eggs d Zabagone. — Beat the yolks of six eggs with as much Cyprus or Malaga wine as the eggshells will contain; add three spoonfuls of powdered, sifted sugar; heat d bain-marie, stirring or beating all the time; when it thickens, pour into glasses and serve with wafers.

Curried Eggs. — Slice an onion; fry it in butter; take out the onion; add a teacupful of milk and a dessertspoonful of curry-powder; let it stew until it is thick, then add half a pint of stock, thickened with browned flour; allow this to come almost to a boil, and pour redhot over four hard-boiled eggs, cut in thick slices; it is best to cut the eggs and arrange them neatly in a very hot dish, with a garland of water-cress round them and thin slices of lemon; then, at the last moment, pour over the boiling sauce, and serve at once.

Devilled Eggs. — Boil the eggs hard, remove the shells, and cut the eggs in half, slicing a bit off the bottoms to make them stand upright, d la Columbus; extract the yolks, and rub to a smooth paste with melted butter, cayenne pepper, a touch of mustard, and a dash of vinegar; fill the hollowed whites with this, and send to table upon a bed of chopped cresses, seasoned with pepper, salt, vinegar, and a soupcon of sugar; the salad should be two inches thick.

Fondue — Eggs with Cheese (Brillat Savarin). — One egg for each guest; Gruyere cheese, one third the weight of the eggs; butter, the same weight.

Have the eggs well beaten, and brought to table in a chafing-dish, then add the butter, and the cheese grated; light the lamp under the chafing-dish, and stir the mixture continually with a wooden spoon, adding meanwhile a little salt and cayenne.

Omelette au Thun (Brillat Savarin). — Take, for six persons, the roes of two carp, bleach them by throwing them for a moment into boiling salted water; take a piece of fresh tunny the size of a hen's egg, to which add a small chopped onion; hash up the roe, onion, and tunny well together, and throw them into a saucepan with a sufficient piece of very good butter; stir continually until the butter is melted; take a second piece of butter and mix it thoroughly with minced parsley and chives; squeeze the juice of a lemon over it, and place it in the dish destined to receive the omelette, which you must then place in the oven, so that the dish may be thoroughly heated, and the butter thoroughly melted, by the time the omelette is done; then beat up very thoroughly twelve fresh eggs; add the saute, roe, and tunny, stirring furiously to mix all together, and proceed to make and cook the omelet as usual, endeavoring to turn it out long, thick, and soft. "A dish to be reserved for amateurs who know how to eat" (Brillat Savarin).

Truffled Eggs. — Beat four eggs in a dish with a little cream and a pinch of salt; chop up a truffle very fine, add this to the eggs and pour into your saucepan, stirring until it becomes a cream; it will not require more than five minutes to cook.

Stuffed Eggs. — Boil a clove of garlic in a little water for fifteen minutes; stir in two anchovies and a few chopped capers; mix them with the yolks (hard-boiled) of eggs; add oil, vinegar, and pepper; stuff this in the whites and serve.

Tenderloin Eggs. — Put a piece of butter, sliced onions, and sliced mushrooms into a saucepan; when the onions begin to color, stir in a pinch of flour; moisten with bouillon and a little white wine; salt and pepper; let it cook half an hour until it becomes the consistency of a sauce; have your eggs hard-boiled; put the yolks in whole and slice your whites in quarters; let it boil up once, and serve hot.

Bird''s-JH'est of Eggs. — Boil some eggs hard; take out the yolks carefully, leaving them whole; cut the whites into thin strips, and arrange them on a dish in the form of a bird's-nest; have ready a.puree of spinach, with which fill up the nest; on this arrange the yolks in a pyramid; pour over all a rich white sauce and serve.

Hunter's Omelet. — Beat ten or twelve eggs light, and season them with salt and pepper, and, if you choose, a very little nutmeg; butter, some little pannikins, and fill each with the beaten egg; cook the little omelets carefully, browning both sides, then turn them out on a plate, and when cold spread them thickly with anchovy butter, and pile one on the other. These omelets are very nice for a journey, or hunting and fishing expeditions.

Omelette d la Lyonnaise. — Put a large lump of butter in a frying or an omelet pan; then beat eight eggs as light as possible, seasoning them with pepper, salt, and a pinch of grated Parmesan cheese; when they are as light as they can be, and the butter melted, pour the eggs into the omelet-pan, and shake the pan in such a way that the omelet will form without being touched with a spoon; when it is formed and brown roll it, and serve on a hot dish.

Omelette & VAllemonde or Schmarn. — Put into a dish four teaspoonfuls of the finest white flour sifted; three whole eggs; the yolks of three more; half a tumblerful of good cream; salt and pepper to taste.

Beat all smoothly together, pass through a sieve, and fry in an omelet-pan with plenty of butter; take care to keep this omelet thin, and pierce it, while cooking, in different places with a silver fork; when nicely browned fold and dish.

Omelet, Plain. — Six eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately and to the very utmost; one small cupful of rich milk.

When the yolks are beaten thick add the milk, and beat hard and long; then add the beaten whites, and pepper and salt; have ready a large lump of butter in a hot frying-pan; when the butter hisses, pour in the omelet and cook ten minutes over a clear fire; do not stir the omelet, but watch carefully and slip a spatula or broad-bladed knife under it as the eggs "set;" when done cover the omelet-pan with a large hot plate, and upset the omelet cleverly on the plate; eat at once, as it soon falls.

Omelette aux Fines Herbes. — Make as above; but beat into the eggs and milk two tablespoonfuls of chopped parsley, green thyme, and sweet marjoram, with pepper and salt; fry as above.

Omelet with Asparagus. — Take the green tops of young asparagus, stew until tender, mince, season, and beat in when the omelet is ready for the pan.

Cauliflower Omelet. — Chop some cold cauliflower very fine, and mix in when the omelet is ready for the pan; season with pepper, salt, cayenne, and a pinch of Parmesan cheese.

Omelet with Mushrooms. — Cook some mushrooms until tender; then chop fine and beat into the omelet just as it is ready to fry.

Or, you may take stewed mushrooms, lay them on the top of the omelet when it is cooked, fold, and dish at once.

Omelet with Tomatoes — Make an omelet as above; when cooked lay on it some stewed tomatoes, fold, and serve.

Omelet with Artichokes. — Chop some cold boiled artichokes very fine, beat into the omelet, season, and fry as usual.

Omelet with Oysters wilt be found under the head of "Oysters."

Omelet with Ham, Tongue, Chicken, or Smoked Beef. — Make as above; but when the omelet is cooked sprinkle it thickly with the meat preferred, fold, and serve.

The Unrivalled Cook-book and Housekeeper's Guide MILK AND BUTTER.

GENERAL RULES FOR ATTENDING TO MILK AND BUTTER.

Keep in a cool cellar, dairy, or milk-room. Allow no strongly flavored substances to be in the neighborhood of milk or butter. -Place upon swing shelves. Use broad, shallow earthenware pans if you can get them; if not, tin pans made in one piece ; keep pans, jars,crockf, and churn exquisitely clean and fresh, scalding and airing persistently and continually; scald your pans always a short time before straining the milk into them; then set the pans on swing shelves, and in twelve hours Bkitn for the table; then let it stand twelve hours more for the second rising of the cream ; put this into the stone jar or crock in which the cream is kept for churning. It is always worth while to do this, as the second rising of cream repays the trouble. As soon as the cream "loppers," or thickens, churn.

Fresh Butter. — Scald the churn thoroughly, then cool as thoroughly with ice or spring water, then pour in the thick cream; churn fast at first, then, as the butter forms, more slowly, always with perfect regularity; in warm weather pour a little cold water into the churn, should the butter form slowly; take it up with the perforated dasher, turning it dexterously just below the surface of the buttermilk, to catch every stray bit; have ready some clear, very cold water, in a deep wooden tray, and into this plunge the dasher when you draw it from the churn; the butter will float off, leaving the dasher free. When you have collected all the butter, gather behind a wooden butter shovel, and drain off the water,squeezing and pressing the butter with the shovel; set in a cool place, for an hour, to harden, then work and knead it until not another drop of water exudes, and the butter is perfectly smooth and close in texture and polish; then with the paddle make up into rolls, little balls, stamped pats, etc.

Salt Butter. — Proceed precisely as above, but when you have worked out the buttermilk, add by degrees fine salt, in the proportion of a dessertspoonful to every pound; then set aside for some hours, always in a cool place; then mould as above. Wrap each roll in a clean, wet linen cloth, with no touch of soap or starch about it, and pack in a stone jar, sprinkling a little salt between the layers.

Salt Butter, to Keep. — Work with special care, and pack down hard in a perfectly clean stone jar; it must be a fresh jar, one never before used ; press a fine linen cloth closely to the surface, and cover this with a thick layer of clean, fine salt; set in a cool, dry place, and keep closely covered.

Rennet. — The stomach of a fresh-killed calf, well cleaned, and scoured inside and out with salt; when perfectly clean, tack upon a frame to dry in the sun for a day; cut in squares, pack down in salt, and keep in wine or brandy; when you wish to use the salted, soak half an hour in cold water, wash well, and put into the milk to be turned, tied to a string, so that you may draw it out without breaking the curd. Sometimes the dried and salted rennet may be bought in the markets and drug shops. Bottled rennet is also sold in the drug shops.

Vrai Fromage d la Crime, No. 1, or Frontage de Chantilly. — One quart of very rich cream, two or three days old; a pinch of gum arabic, powdered fine.

Put into an earthenware bowl, which you have surrounded with pounded ice, and a handful of salt; whip the cream hard and long, until it is as smooth as velvet; then add a little powdered sugar, whipping it in gradually; then put into a wicker basket (or panier de fromage). It should be heart-shaped, and lined with a coarse linen cloth. Place this in a deep earthenware dish, being careful to put little pieces of wood, an inch thick, under the panier de fromage, so as to raise it a little; put the earthenware dish in the refrigerator; when ready to serve, turn out the frontage on a deep dish; smother with fresh cream, and serve. This is the genuine fromage d la crime of the Parisian street cries.

Fromage d la Crime, No. 2, or Fromage de Viry. — One half quantity of whipped cream as above; one half quantity of plain cream cheese.

Mix to a smooth cream, whip to velvet, whip in sugar to taste, and one drop essence of bitter almonds; then proceed as above.

Fromage d la Crime, No. 3. — One quart of fresh rich milk, heated to tepid warmth; a piece of rennet as large as a pea, dissolved in the milk.

Put in a covered vessel on the hot coals; when the milk is turned, put into a heart-shaped wicker basket, lined with coarse linen. When it has well drained, put into a deep dish, smother in rich, fresh cream, dust with fine sugar, and serve.

Old Virginia Cream Cheese. — Put aside a quart of good cream until it is sour, and very thick, and stir into it a tablespoonful of salt; lay a piece of thin muslin on a hair sieve, so as to draw the cheese out in the muslin. Put a sieve on a dish, pour in the cream, and let it drain for three days, pouring off the whey every morning. If the cream will not go in all at once, add it during the day, as the whey sinks. It should be of the consistency of butter when eaten. Put into a large heart-shaped tin mould to press. The bottom of the mould should be pierced with round holes, and should stand on little feet, so that the cheese may drain while pressing. Eat with sweet cream and sugar.

New Jersey Cream Cheese. — Scald the milk, and let it cool a little before putting in the rennet. When the curd is formed,take it out on a ladle without breaking it; lay it on a thin cloth held by two persons; dash a ladleful of water over each ladleful of curd, to separate the curd; hang it up to drain the water off, and then put it under a light press for one hour; cut the curd with a thread into small pieces; lay a cloth between each two, and press for an hour; take them out, rub them with fine salt, let them lie on a board for an hour, and wash them in cold water; let them lie to drain, and in a day or two the skin will look dry; put some sweet grass under and over them, and they will soon ripen.

Neufchatel Cheese. — Stir a little salt into a pan of loppered cream; pour into a linen bag, and let it drain three days, changing the bag every day; then pack into a wooden mould with holes in the bottom, and press two hours; wet the mould in cold water before putting in the cream curd; wrap each cheese in several folds of soft, white tissue paper, and put into a cool place. Thus arranged, these cheeses will keep for a week.

Cottage or Pot Cheese. — Heat sour milk until the whey rises to the top; pour it off, put the card in a bag, and let it drip six hours without squeezing it; put into a wooden bowl, chop fine with a wooden spoon, salt to taste, and work to the consistency of soft putty, adding a little cream and butter as you proceed. Mould with your hands into round balls, and keep in a cool place. Pot-cheese should be eaten fresh. It is delicious with brown bread and fresh butter, and just a little sowpgon of red pepper.

Junket, or Slip and Go Down — One quart of rich milk; one piece of rennet, or a teaspoonful of the wine in which the rennet is kept, to each quart of milk; one tablespoonful of powdered sugar to each quart; a little nutmeg.

Cover closely, and set in a very warm place for an hour. If by that time there are no signs of stiffening, add more rennet. When it is as firm as blanc-mange, and before the whey separates, remove the rennet; then set the junket upon ice until wanted; dust lightly with finely grated nutmeg, and eat with powdered sugar and cream.

Bonny Clabber, or Zoppered Milk. — Set a dish of skimmed milk away in a warm place, closely covered; when it turns, i. e., becomes smooth and firm like blancmange, serve in the same dish; grate a little nutmeg over it, and eat with powdered sugar and cream.

Thickened Milk. — One quart of milk; a pinch of salt; two tablespoonfuls of rice flour wet in cold milk.

Stir smoothly the rice flour into the boiling milk, and let it thicken in a vessel placed in a pan of boiling water, keeping the water at a hard boil for an hour; stir continually, or it will not be quite smooth.

Staffordshire Syllabub. — One pint of cider; one wineglassful of brandy; sugar to taste; a pinch of nutmeg.

Put into a very deep bowl; stir well until the sugar is thoroughly dissolved; then fasten a fine hair sieve over the bowl, and milk into it. This is the genuine, far-famed Staffordshire syllabub.

Somersetshire Syllabub. — In a large china bowl put a pint of port and a pint of sherry; sugar to taste; milk the bowl full.

In twenty minutes' time cover it pretty high with clotted cream; grate nutmeg over it; put also some powdered cinnamon and noupareil comfits.

Posset Syllabub. — Mix a quart of thick cream with one pound of lump sugar, and a pint of white wine; rub a few lumps of sugar on the rind of two or three lemons to extract the essence; pour upon them the juice of three lemons; add this to the cream and whisk one way until thick.

Devonshire Clotted Cream. — That made from the milk of the Alderney or Guernsey cow is the richest, apparently irrespective of pasture. The milk of one day is scalded on the next. It is best to scald it over hot water. The milk-pans should be of tin, round, about forty-two inches in circumference at the top, and five inches deep. They should fit on another pan which holds the hot water and stands on the stove; it takes about half an hour to scald the cream, the water in the under tin being kept boiling.

Devonshire Cream Curds. — Seven eggs; three gills of water; three pints of milk; one gill of rich cream; one tablespoonful of the best vinegar.

Put all in a stewpan over the fire, and let it boil two or three minutes to separate the curd. Eat cold, with fruit and sugar.

BREAD, BISCUITS, MUFFINS, ETC.

GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR MAKING BREAD.

But new flour if possible; it takes up more water than the old and yields a larger amount of bread. A pint of milk in a batch of four loaves of bread gives you a pound more bread of better quality, and helps to keep it moist. One pound of pea meal, or ground split pease, added to every fourteen pounds of flour, increases its nourishment. When bread is too stale to eat or to make into bread broth, dry it in a cool oven, or over the top of the fire; roll it with a rolling pin; sift through a sieve, and put into a wide-mouthed and closely covered glass jar; keep in a dry place, and use for breading fish, chops, croquettes, etc. If you have a whole stale loaf, put it into a tightly covered tin can and steam it, or put it into a moderately warm oven for half an hour. It will then be quite as palatable as fresh bread.

Flour, to Choose. — Flour should be fine, dry, elastic, odorless, and tasteless. It should not have even a suspicion of mustiness or acidity. It should not be moist, nor retain the impress of your palm and fingers if you squeeze it into a ball. Nor, as you run it through your fingers, should it feel musty, damp, or glutinous, but light, dry, and almost impalpable.

Yeast, to Choose. — Should be light in color, lively, effervescing easily when shaken, and emitting an odor like weak ammonia. If dull or sour it is not fit to use.

Yeast without Hops. — This yeast is desirable, as it never tastes bitter, even in hot cakes. Five large potatoes, grated; one quart of boiling water; one teacupful of yeast; one teacupful of brown sugar; one tablespoonful of salt.

Add the potatoes when grated to the quart of boiling water; boil five minutes, then remove it from the fire, and add the teacupf nl of brown sugar and the tablespoonful of salt. When it cools, add the yeast.

Potato Yeast. — Twelve good-sized potatoes, peeled, boiled, and mashed; one handful of hops, boiled in a quart of water; one cupful of brown sugar; half a cupful of salt; one cupful of good yeast.

Measure the hop tea when done, and pour it on the mashed potatoes. Measure the water in which the potatoes were boiled, and then, from a kettle of boiling water, make up what is wanting of a gallon of fluid; add the brown sugar and the salt; let it stand until lukewarm, and then add the yeast; set it to rise for twenty-four hours. This yeast will ferment like beer.

Sponge made of the Above. — Mash a hot boiled potato; mix it with about two quarts of flour, and two large kitchenspoonfuls of the yeast; beat it well, and set it to rise about one P.m.; about seven, make up the bread with this sponge.

Yeast for Bread (Pennsylvania receipt). — Two quarts of very strong hop tea; six good-sized white potatoes, mashed through a sieve; half a teacupful of finest white flour, sifted; half a teacupful of salt; one teacupful of sugar.

Beat this mixture until quite smooth, and let it boil up once; when cold, add a piece of leaven or some yeast to set it going, and bottle and cork it tight; shake it well before using it. For bread, take two tablespoonfuls to each quart of flour.

Bread — General Rules. — Imprimis, use none but the best flour; sift all white flour well and thoroughly.

2. Mix the dough as soft as it can be handled.

3. Set the dough to rise in a moderately warm place, and keep it at an even temperature. If by any accident you should find your dough puffy and sour, dissolve a little soda or saleratus in hot water, and work it well in.

4. Knead the bread faithfully and from all sides, until it rebounds like an India-rubber ball from a smart blow of the fist on the centre of the mass.

5. The oven should not be too hot, and the heat should be perfectly steady after the bread goes in. If you cannot hold your bare arm in the oven while you count thirty, the oven is too hot to bake bread.

6. Grease your pans well before putting in the bread.

7. When you take the bread from the oven, turn out from the pan, and stand each loaf upright on edge; the lower part resting on the table, the upper supported by some upright object. Throw a clean, dry, light cloth over all. Do not put away until quite cold. Then keep in a tin bread box, folded in clean cloths.

Bread Sponge (Mary Anne's). — Six potatoes, peeled, boiled, and mashed fine while hot; six tablespoonfuls of baker's yeast; two tablespoonfuls of white sugar; two tablespoonfuls of lard ; one teaspoonful of soda; one quart of warm water; three cups of finest white flour, sifted.

Mash the potatoes, and work in the lard and sugar. Work to a cream, mixing in gradually a quart of the water in which the potatoes were boiled. This water should be used blood-warm. Beat in the flour smoothly, then the yeast, lastly the soda. Cover lightly if the weather is warm; more closely in winter, and set to rise overnight in a warm place.

Family Bread, White, No. 1 (Mary Anne's). — For the above sponge, sift two quarts and a pint of flour into the bread-tray; sift with the flour three teaspoonf uls of fine salt; make a hole in the middle of the heap; pour in the risen sponge; flour your hands thoroughly, and work down the flour into the sponge with your hands. If you can mould it at all, it is not too soft. If too stiff, rinse out the bowl in which the sponge was set with a little lukewarm water, and work this well in. As soon as you have the dough in manageable shape, begin to knead, and knead steadily for half an hour at least; knead always towards the centre of the mass, turning it repeatedly over and over, and round and round, that no portion may escape manipulation; lift the dough from the tray in your left hand, while with your right you sprinkle flour thickly over the bottom and sides of the tray; toss back the dough, and knead and turn as before. When the half-hour is up, form the dough into a round ball; sprinkle flour on the top; place in the centre of the kneading-tray; cover with a clean cloth, and leave on the kitchen table to rise, taking care it is not in a draught of cold air. It will need four or five hours to rise in summer, and six in winter. The dough will in that time treble its original bulk. Then knead again for fifteen minutes; divide into loaves; prick each with a fork; put into greased pans; cover with a clean cloth, and leave for an hour. Then bake, following the directions given above for baking. One hour in a good oven ought to be enough for the above quantity.

Family Bread, White, No. 2 (Old Humphrey). — Four quarts of finest wheat flour, sifted; one quart of milk-warm water; half a pint of baker's yeast; one tablespoonf ul of salt.

Dissolve the salt in the water, and add the yeast; put the flour into a kneading-bowl; make a hollow in the middle of the flour, and pour the yeast and water into it, leaving a wall of the dry flour around it, after beating it well; then place the pan in a warm, dry place, in the kitchen, if it be winter. In warm weather, a cooler place must be selected. Cover it well, and let it stand all night; this must be done before bedtime. About eight or nine o'clock the next morning the dough will have risen, and covered nearly all the flour on the sides; then knead in the flour until the dough is soft, and easily kneaded; take it out of the pan, and knead it thoroughly on the paste-board; then cut into three or four pieces, and knead each by itself ; lay each piece in a buttered baking-pan; set them in a warm place for two or three hours; they must rise nearly to the top of the pans ; bake them for about half an hour; keep the oven closed for ten or fifteen minutes before venturing to open the door. If an oven heated by wood is used, the bread will require nearly double the time.

Bread, Made Soft and Quickly (Mary Anne's). — Three quarts of flour (finest white flour, well sifted); half a pint of yeast; one tablespoonful of lard; one tablespoonf ul of salt; warm water enough to make a dough.

Dissolve the lard and salt in the warm water; then add the yeast, then the flour, gradually, stirring it with a spoon; set it to rise in a warm place all night. In the morning take a part of the dough, and mould it into biscuits for breakfast. Knead the rest as above; then put it into pans, letting it rise in the pans for half an hour before baking. �

Brown Bread (William Penn's). — One quart of Graham flour, sifted; one pint of Indian meal, sifted; one cupful of molasses; one teaspoonf ul of soda; one teaspoon ul of salt; one quart of cold water.

Mix all gradually and smoothly together; steam it in a pudding boiler for four hours; turn it out on a baking plate, and bake one hour.

New England Brown Bread. — Two cupfuls of Indian meal; two cupfuls of rye meal; one cupful of wheat flour; one cupful of molasses; one and a half pints of sweet milk; one teaspoonful of soda; one pinch of salt.

Cook, d bain-marie, four and a half hours without stopping. This bread is never baked.

Milk Bread. — One quart of milk, blood-warm; half a teacupful of yeast; a quarter of a pound of butter; one tablespoonful of white sugar.

Stir into the milk a pint of sifted flour, the sugar, and lastly the yeast; beat all together well, and allow to rise five or six hours; then melt the butter, and add with a little salt; work in flour enough to make a stiff dough; let this rise four hours, then make into small loaves, and into crescents, like Vienna bread; set near the fire for half an hour, and bake in buttered pans. In warm weather add to the risen sponge a teaspoonf ul of soda, dissolved in warm water.

Buttermilk Bread. — One pint of buttermilk, scalding hot; half a gill of yeast; one teaspoonf ul of soda, dissolved in hot water; a little salt; two tablespoonfuls of melted butter.

Stir into the buttermilk, while hot, enough flour to make a tolerably thick batter; add the yeast, and let it rise five or six hours; in the morning stir into the sponge first the soda, as directed, then the salt, sugar, and melted butter; work in just enough flour to enable you to handle the dough easily; knead well; make into loaves, and let it rise until light. Bake as usual.

Rice Bread. — Make a sponge of one quart of warm water; one teacupful of yeast; one tablespoonful of white sugar; two tablespoonfuls of lard; one quart of wheat flour, sifted. When risen, add three pints of warm milk; three teacupfuls of rice flour, wet to a paste, with cold milk, and boiled four minutes.

The sponge will take five hours to rise. The milk and rice flour should be stirred in blood-warm. If the dough should be still too thin to handle, add just enough wheat flour to enable you to do so; knead thoroughly. Allow the bread to rise twice, and bake as usual.

Lowell Brown Bread. — Three teacupfuls of Indian meal; two teacupfuls of rye meal; half a teacupful of molasses ; one teaspoonful of salt; one teaspoonful of soda.

Mix in a little less than a quart of milk, and bake it for two hours.

Rye and Indian Bread. — One quart of Indian meal; half a cupful of molasses.

Pour on enough boiling water to scald all the meal thoroughly; set it away to cool, and, when it becomes milk-warm, add one pint of rye flour, one cupful of yeast, and a little salt. Steam it for three hours, and bake for one hour.

Wisconsin Steamed Brown Bread. — Three cupfuls of sweet milk; one cupful of sour milk; three cupfuls of corn meal, sifted; one cupful of flour, sifted; half a cupful of molasses; a piece of butter the size of a small egg; one teaspoonful of saleratns dissolved in hot water; a pinch of salt.

Make up into dough; knead well, and steam three hours. Be sure to cover the basin tightly within the steamer.

Graham Bread, No. 1. — One quart of Graham flour, sifted; half a cupful of yeast; one teaspoonful of salt; two tablespoons uls of molasses.

Mix with warm water to a stiff batter, knead, and, when light, bake for one hour.

Graham Bread, No. 2. — One quart of Graham flour, sifted; one small cupful of molasses; one teaspoonful of soda sifted dry into the flour; one tablespoonful of lard; one pinch of salt; sour milk enough to make a stiff batter.

Stir it very quickly, and bake it slowly in deep pans.

Graham Bread, No. 3. — Three cupfuls of Graham flour; one cupful of white flour, sifted; one quart of water; two tablespoonfuls of yeast; two tablespoonfuls of molasses.

Mix and knead as usual, and steam as you steam Wisconsin Brown Bread.

Brown Bread. — Make a sponge as for white bread, using potatoes or white flour; allow two parts of Graham flour, unsifted; one third white.

For every quart of this mixture, allow one handful of Indian meal, and one teaspoonful of salt; wet this up with the sponge, and, when well mixed, add for every loaf of fair size half a teacupful of molasses. The dough should' be very soft. If there is not enough sponge to reduce it to the required consistency, add a little blood-warm water; knead hard and long; it will rise very slowly; put it down for a second rising, after you have kneaded it the second time. Bake steadily for a longer time than you would white bread. Take care that it does not burn, and do not cut while hot.

Brown Bread. — Half a pint of flour; one pint of corn meal; half a pint of rye flour; one teaspoonful of salt; two teaspoonfuls of baking-powder; one tablespoonful of brown sugar; sift together until thoroughly mixed.

Peel, wash, and boil two medium-sized potatoes, rub them through a sieve, and beat them well, with half a pint of water; make a batter of this and of the meal; butter a deep basin or small pan, and pour the batter in, then set the pari in a kettle of boiling water; cover and cook in this way for an hour; then put the bread in a hot oven for half an hour.

Milk Bread. — One quart of milk; half a teacupful of yeast; one pint of sifted flour; one quarter of a pound of butter; one tablespoonful of white sugar.

Stir into the milk, when blood - warm, first the flour, then the sugar, and lastly the yeast; beat long and well, and allow to rise for five or six hours; then add the butter melted, and a little salt; work in flour enough to make a stiff dough; let this rise four hours, then make into small loaves; set near the fire for half an hour, and bake.

Buttermilk Biscuit. — One pint of buttermilk; one teaspoonful of soda sifted into the flour; two teaspoonfuls of melted butter; enough fine white flour to make a soft dough.

Mix, roll, cut out quickly, lay in buttered pans, and bake in a quick oven.

Flannel Biscuit. — Half a pint of cream; whites of two eggs; one tablespoonful of yeast; enough white sifted flour to make a thin batter.

Beat all well together, adding the flour last; bake in small square tins, on a buttered pan, and in a quick oven.

Rye-Flour Drop Cakes. — One quart of milk; two tablespoonfuls of cream; three eggs, well beaten; a little salt; enough rye flour to make pancake batter.

Mix in the order above given; then beat the batter hard and long, with a large iron spoon, adding more flour in order to make the dough a little stiffer; then dip the spoon in milk, then in the rye batter, and drop in buttered drop-irons; bake in a quick oven to a fine brown.

Light Biscuit (Dinah's). — One quart of wheat flour, well sifted; one teaspoonful of salt; one teacupful of yeast; one tablespoonful of sugar, dissolved in the yeast; one egg; a piece of lard the size of a walnut.

Sprinkle the salt into the flour; then add the lard, egg, yeast, and sugar, with enough warm water to make a soft dough; put into a pan, cover, and set to rise in a warm place; when well risen, work in a little more flour, and make it into small rolls; put them into a hot oven, and bake.

Soda Biscuit (Dinah's). — One quart of flour; two cupfuls of fresh milk; one teaspoonful of soda; one teaspoonful of cream of tartar; one saltspoonf ul of salt; two heaping tablespoonfuls of lard or butter.

Rub the soda and cream of tartar well through the flour, and sift all together carefully and thoroughly; then put in the salt, then the lard or butter, rubbing it carefully into the sifted flour; lastly, pour in the milk; roll the dough out smoothly and quickly, handling as little as possible. It should be very soft, nearly as soft as it can be handled; if the flour should make it too stiff, add more milk. Roll out lightly ; cut into cakes half an inch thick; lay in buttered pans, and bake in a quick oven.

Graham Biscuit (" Common-Sense in the Household "). — Three cupfuls of Graham flour; one cupful of white flour; three cupfuls of fresh or sweet milk; two tablespoonfuls of lard; one heaping tablespoonful of white sugar; one saltspoonful of salt; one teaspoonful of soda; two teaspoonf uls of cream of tartar.

Mix and bake as yon do the white soda biscuit.

Graham Wafer Biscuit. — One pint of Graham flour; one quart of boiling milk; one teaspoonful of salt.

Salt the flour, and mix with the milk into as soft a dough as you can handle; roll half an inch thick, cut into round cakes, lay in buttered pans, and bake in the hottest oven you can get.

Bread Biscuit Rolls. — Set aside from the risen dough enough to make some rolls; work in a heaping tablespoonful of lard or butter, and let it stand in a tolerably cool place for four hours; knead again,and leave for three hours; then form into small rolls; put them into buttered pans; let the rolls rise again for an hour, then bake in a quick oven half an hour.

Haised Biscuit (Dinah's). — One quart of warm milk; three quarters of a cup of butter, melted; three quarters of a cup of yeast; two tablespoonfuls of white sugar, one teaspoonful of salt; flour enough to make a soft dough.

Mix overnight. In the morning roll into a sheet three quarters of an inch thick; cut these into round cakes; set them closely in a buttered baking-pan, let them rise twenty minutes, and bake twenty minutes. They are very good.

Milk Cakes. — One and a half pounds of finest white flour, sifted; two ounces of butter; a pinch of salt; a teaspoonful of baking-powder.

Roll out the paste thin, and cut into flat cakes; put into a greased or buttered pan, and bake for one hour in a quick oven.

Tea Loaves. — One pound of flour (as above); two eggs; two ounces of butter; one teaspoonful of baking-powder; half a teaspoonful of salt.

Knead with milk into small loaves, and bake from ten to fifteen minutes.

Brown-Bread Biscuit. — One pound of coarse brown flour or oatmeal flour; two ounces of butter; a little water.

Make the butter and water boiling hot, and add both to the flour, keeping the paste firm; roll out very thin; cut into round shapes with a tumbler; put into a greased or buttered pan, and bake for ten minutes in a quick oven.

Crumpets. — To a quart of warm milk and water add a tablespoonful of good yeast, and two eggs, well beaten.

Mix with these, by degrees, as much sifted flour as will make a thick batter; then heat a very small frying-pan; rub it with butter, and pour in a large spoonful of batter, which will spread over the pan. Watch the under side by raising it with a fork, and, when brown, turn it, watching the other side in the same way. When wanted for the table they should be toasted, buttered, and sent up hot.

Muffins. — Two pounds of sifted flour; two eggs, well beaten; two ounces of butter,melted in a pint of milk; four or five spoonfuls of yeast.

Beat thoroughly, and set to rise for two or three hours; bake in greased muffin rings on a hot griddle.

Laplanders. — One pint of flour; one pint of milk; two eggs,well beaten,whites and yolks separately; one pinch of salt; one tablespoonful of melted butter.

Mix the milk and flour smoothly together; then beat the yolks of the eggs, and stir them in with the salt and batter; stir the whites of the eggs in last, beating all well together; have the pan very hot, and drop in a large spoonful for each biscuit.

Marylanders. — Two quarts of sifted flour; two tablespoonfuls of lard; two tablespoonfuls of butter; a little water and salt.

Make the dough as stiff as possible; then work and knead it for half an hour, or longer, until very soft and pliable; then beat it with a rolling pin for about an hour, or until the dough cracks loudly; cut into small rounds; prick with a fork, and bake in a quick oven. The success of this delicious biscuit depends upon the long-continned pounding.

Wafer Biscuit. — One pound of sifted flour; one ounce of butter; beaten white of one egg; as much milk as will make a thick paste.

Work the paste up well; then set before the fire for twenty minutes; roll out as thin as paper, cut into round cakes, and bake three minutes in a quick oven.

Captain's Biscuit. — Pour enough milk over some sifted flour to enable you to roll it out; knead and roll into smooth, thin sheets; cut into rounds; prick with a fork, and bake from ten to fifteen minutes in a quick oven.

Orange Biscuits. — Boil whole Seville oranges in two or three waters until most of the bitterness is gone; cut them and take out the pulp and juice; then pound the rinds to a fine paste in a mortar, and put to it an equal weight of double-refined sugar, beaten and sifted; when mixed to a smooth paste spread on china dishes and set in the sun or before the fire to dry; when half dry cut into rounds; turn the other side, and dry that. Keep in a box between layers of tissue paper.

Fayal Biscuit. — One cupful of sifted flour; one cupful of milk; three eggs, well beaten; piece of butter the size of an egg; two teaspoonfuls of baking-powder; beat all well together, and bake in rings.

Passover Bread. — Six Passover biscuits, soaked all night; a very little milk; piece of butter the size of an egg (melted); pepper and salt to taste; drain the soaked biscuits; chop them fine; mix with the seasoning the butter and a very little milk.

Make the mixture into a large cake, and fry it well on both sides in butter.

Batter Bread (Old Virginia Breakfast Cake).. — Six tablespoonfuls of sifted flour; three tablespoonfuls of corn meal; four eggs beaten well; enough milk to enable yon to make the whole into a thin batter; add a pinch of salt; heat well; put into small tin moulds, and bake in a quick oven.

Rice Muffins. — One cupful of cold boiled rice; one pint of flour, sifted; two eggs; one quart of fresh milk; one tablespoonful of lard or butter; one teaspoonful of salt.

Beat hard, and bake quickly.

Hominy Waffles. — Half a pint of cold boiled hominy; half a pint of rice flour; two tablespoonfuls of wheat flour; one pint of milk; one tablespoonful of butter; two eggs well beaten.

Mix, and bake in waffle irons.

Grandmamma JV.'s Waffles. — Make precisely as above, substituting cold boiled farina, for the hominy. Grandmamma E7s waffles are delicious.

Buttermilk Muffins. — One quart of buttermilk, or loppered sweet milk; two eggs well beaten; one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water; one teaspoonful of salt; flour to make a good batter.

Stir the beaten eggs into the milk, then the flour and salt, and, lastly, the soda; bake at once in a quick oven.

Hominy Muffins. — Three cupfuls of sour milk; two cupfuls of fine hominy, boiled and cold; three eggs well beaten, yolks and whites separately; half a cupful of melted butter; two teaspoonfuls of salt; two tablespoonfuls of white sugar; one large cupful of flour, sifted; one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water.

Beat the hominy smooth; then stir in the milk, butter, salt, and sugar; then the eggs, soda, and flour; bake in a quick oven.

Bread Muffins. — Take four thick slices of light, stale, baker's bread, and cut off all the crust; lay them in a pan and pour boiling water over them, but barely enough to soak them well; cover the bread, and when it has stood an hour drain off the water and stir the soaked bread until it is a smooth mass; then mix in two tablespoonfuls of sifted flour, and half a pint of milk; having beaten two eggs — yolks and whites separately — -to their utmost capacity, stir them gradually into the mixture; when all the ingredients are smoothly mixed together, pour into greased muffin rings and bake on a hot griddle; bake brown, send to table hot, pull apart, and butter. They are very good.

Soft Muffins. — One quart of milk; three eggs, beaten to the utmost; two ounces of butter; one teaspoonful of salt; two large tablespoonfuls of brewer's yeast, or four of home-made; enough sifted flour to make a stiff batter.

Warm the milk and butter together, arid add the salt; beat the eggs very light, and stir them into the milk and butter; then stir in the yeast, and, lastly, flour enough to make a thick batter; cover the mixture, and set it to rise for three hours in a warm place; when it is quite light, grease the baking-iron and rings, set the rings on the iron, pour the batter into them, and bake a light brown.

Griddle Muffins. — One quart of milk; four eggs; one tablespoonful of salt; one ponnd and ten ounces of the finest white flour, sifted.

Beat all well together, and add three tablespoonfuls of brewer's yeast; set it to rise for two or three hours before needed, and bake the muffins in rings.

Oven Muffins. — One quart of milk; four eggs; one tablespoonful of salt; two pounds of the finest white flour, sifted.

Warm the milk and heat all together well; then add half a cupful of home-made yeast; set it to rise for nine hours; then bake the muffins iu rings in a quick oven for ten minutes.

Madison Muffins. — Three pints of flour; two eggs; a tablespoonful of lard; two teaspoonfuls of white sugar in a cupful of yeast.

Make up the muffins with warm milk — a little softer than for light bread; in the morning roll out the dough, cut it out like biscuit, and bake in an oven.

Flour Muffins. — One pint of flour; one pint of new milk; a small piece of butter; two eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately; and a little salt.

Mix, bake, and serve quickly, as they fall by standing.

Cream Muffins. — One quart of sweet cream; one quart of the finest white flour, sifted; six eggs well beaten, whites and yolks separately; one tablespoonful of butter, one tablespoonful of lard, melted together.

Add the milk to the beaten eggs, then a little salt, then the shortening, lastly the flour, stirring it in lightly; bake immediately in well-greased rings half filled with batter; the oven should be hot, and the muffins eaten as soon as baked.

Pikelets. — One and a half ounces of German yeast, a little flour, a cupful of melted butter, a quart of warm milk, and a little salt.

Make the milk warm, and stir it into the yeast with the salt; add a sufficient quantity of flour to make it into a batter; set it to rise for half an hour; then add a cupful of melted butter, stir it well in, pour the batter into iron rings previously prepared on a hot griddle, and bake them lightly on both sides; when required, toast them on each side, taking care they do not burn; butter them nicely, cut them across, and put them on a hot plate, serving them quickly and hot.

Tea Cakes. — To make a baking-powder for tea cakes, take half a pound of carbonate of soda, half a pound of cream of tartar, half a pound of fine powdered sugar, half a pound of fine table salt; mix all smoothly and well together and put into a tin. To make the tea cakes, take one teaspoonful of this powder, and one pound of the finest white flour, sifted; wet with sour milk or cream, mix into small, round cakes, and bake in a quick oven.

Potato Cakes. — Take one pound of mashed potatoes; two ounces of butter; one pound of the finest white flour, sifted; half a teacupful of cream; one egg well beaten; and a pinch of salt.

Mix all well together, then roll out the cakes thin, cut them into rounds, and bake in a quick oven.

General Washington's Breakfast Rolls. — One pound of flour; one pint of milk; one tablespoonful of butter; half a coffeecupful of yeast.

Beat the batter very light, and set it to rise; when risen, shape it into little pats, and bake them in the oven.

Potato Rolls. — Six large potatoes boiled and mashed; one pint of warm water; one large tablespoonful of melted lard; a coffeespoonful of salt; three tablespoonfuls of brewer's yeast; enough sifted flour to make a thick batter.

Set it to rise in a warm place for an hour or more; when quite light make it into 'a stiff dough, and knead it a long time; cut it into small cakes, put the cakes in pans, and set them to rise on the warm hearth; bake in a quick oven ten minutes.

Gems. — Four cupfuls of sifted flour; one and a half cupfuls of milk; one and a half cupfuls of water.

Mix and beat thoroughly and lightly for ten minutes; heat the gem pans hot in the oven, then butter them; fill them two thirds full, and bake in a hot oven.

Pacific Rolls. — One pint of milk; one and a half pints of sifted flour; one egg well beaten; half a teaspoonful of salt.

Stir the milk by degrees into the flour, then add the egg, and beat all thoroughly for a few minutes; bake in a roll pan half an hour in a quick oven.

Betty's Rolls. — One quart of milk; half a cupful of yeast; two tablespoonfuls of lard; two tablespoonfuls of sugar; a pinch of salt.

Mix to a batter early in the morning, and at noon knead it like bread; roll it out; cut it into rolls with a small saucer. It must rise at least two hours before baking.

Parker House Rolls. — Two quarts of sifted flour; one cupful of yeast (fresh); one tablespoouful of sugar; one pint of cold boiled milk; one pinch of salt; one piece of butter the size of an egg.

Rub the butter well into the flour, then add the other ingredients, and let rise all night. In the morning knead it well; about two o'clock in the afternoon roll out the dough and cut it into circular pieces; then fold one side over to come to the middle of the circle, and put a piece of butter under the fold; then fold the opposite side in like manner, the edges meeting in the middle, and put a piece of butter under that also; bake in pans.

Tea Rolls — One pint of sifted flour; half a cake of yeast; one teacup ful of boiling water; one teaspoonf ul of lard dissolved in the water; one pinch of salt; one egg well beaten; two lumps of loaf sugar.

Mix all well, and set it to rise for about six hours; then work into rolls, adding more flour if necessary ; put into buttered pans to rise, for fifteen minutes, and bake in a quick oven.

Rusks. — One cupful of sweet milk; one cupful of sugar; one cupful of flour.

Stir your flour and sugar in the milk, and set it in a warm place for four or five hours to rise; then beat in a tablespoonful of butter and two eggs; make into rolls; let them rise again, and paint them with the beaten white of egg, and bake rapidly in a quick oven.

Dried Rusk ("Common-Sense in the Household"). — One pint of warm milk; two eggs; half a teacupful of butter; half a cupful of yeast; one teaspoonful of salt.

Set a sponge with these ingredients, leaving out the eggs, and stirring in flour until you have a thick batter; early next morning add the well-beaten eggs, and flour enough to enable you to roll out the dough; let this rise in the bread-bowl two hours; roll into a sheet nearly an inch thick, cut into round cakes, and arrange in a greased baking-pan two deep, laying one on the other carefully; let these stand for another half-hour, and bake; when well baked divide the rusks, pile them up loosely in the pan, set them in the oven when the fire is declining for the night, and leave them there until the morning; then put them into a clean muslin bag and hang them up in the kitchen. They will be fit to eat upon the third day; then butter them evenly and carefully; let them stand in a warm, not hot, place until the butter has been absorbed; then put as many as you need in a deep dish, and pour over them equal quantities of milk and cream. The milk and cream should be stirred together and left on the ice an hour before you want to use it.

Or, yon may soak the rusks a moment or two in iced milk, and then butter them.

Scotch Short Bread. — Two pounds of flour, sifted; one pound of the best butter warmed until very soft; half a pound of powdered sugar.

Chop the flour and butter together, knead in the sugar, roll into a sheet half an inch thick, cut into shapes, lay on buttered paper in a shallow tin, and bake in a quick oven.

Old-fashioned Short Bread. — One pound of the finest white flour, dried and sifted; quarter of a pound of butter; quarter of a pound of lard; one saltspoonful of salt; a pinch of soda, thoroughly dissolved in just enough vinegar to cover it, and well worked in; enough ice-water to enable you to roll out into paste half an inch thick.

Cut into rounds, prick with a fork, and bake light brown; split, butter, and eat hot.

Shaker's Short Cake. — Two quarts of flour, sifted; two tablespoonfuls of lard; three tablespoonfuls of butter; two and a half cupfuls of loppered cream; two eggs well beaten; one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water; one teaspoonful of salt.

Mix this short cake as soft as you can roll it; chop up the shortening in the salted flour, as for pastry; add the eggs and soda to the milk; put all together, handling as little as possible; roll lightly and rapidly into two sheets — the one intended for the upper crust fully half an inch thick, the lower somewhat less; lay the lower in a wellgreased baking-pan; spread thickly over it whatever fresh fruit you prefer, sprinkle sugar over the fruit, cover with the thicker crust, and bake from twenty to twenty-five minutes; eat hot with butter and sugar.

Strawberry Short Cake. — One quart of the finest white flour, sifted; three tablespoonfuls of butter; one large cupful of sour cream; one egg well beaten; one tablespoonful of white sugar; one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water; one saltspoonful of salt.

Proceed precisely as for Shaker's short cake, except that this short cake is to be baked round in jelly-cake tins, one round of paste piled upon another; while warm separate them; put alternate rounds of short cake and fresh strawberries, the latter sprinkled with sugar, until you have a pile higher than a " Sally Lunn;" eat cold with cream.

Scotch Oatmeal Scones. — Put some Scotch oatmeal into a bowl, and pour over it a jugful of boiling water in which half an ounce of salt butter has been dissolved; stir as quickly as possible into a dough, then turn out upon the moulding-board, and roll out as thinly as possible; then cut into rounds and dry on a griddle; afterwards toast both sides before the tire, butter, pile on a plate, and serve.

Scotch Flour Scones. — Take one pint of milk and boil it with a piece of fresh butter; when it boils, pour it over a pound and a half of sifted flour, stirring it quickly round and round, and adding enough water to enable you to roll it out; knead, and roll it out to a thin paste; then cut with a tumbler into small, round scones, cook them on both sides on a griddle, and pile on a hot plate in a folded napkin. They should be served white and hot.

Waffles, No. 1. — One quart of milk carefully thickened with a little sifted flour; one pound of butter melted in the milk; ten eggs, beaten light; a little salt; enough yeast to make it rise — the quantity must be regulated by the quality of the yeast.

Set it to rise in a warm place. To be eaten in the evening waffles should be mixed early in the morning in winter, and in summer at midday; bake in waffle irons.

Waffles, No. 2. — Three pints of fresh milk; twelve eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately; quarter of a pound of butter warmed in the milk; one small teacupful of yeast.

Add enough sifted flour to make the batter as thick as pancakes; the white of the eggs must be put in last; beat it up well; let it rise a little while, and bake in waffle irons well greased with butter.

Mother's Yeast Cakes. — Boil a double handful of hops in a quart of water till it is reduced to a pint; strain it, take half, and stir in enough flour to make a stiff batter; let the other half cool, dissolve in it one yeast cake, stir it in the batter, and beat it well; set to rise in a warm place; in the morning stir in enough fine cornmeal to make the cakes; roll it out, cut out the cakes, and dry them in the shade; keep them always in a dry place.

Beauprls Waffles. — Half a pound of butter stirred to a cream; the yolks of five eggs stirred in half a pound of flour; half a pint of sweet milk gradually stirred in; lastly, the whites of the eggs beaten to a stiff froth, and stirred in the batter.

Minute Waffles. — One heaping pint of the finest white flour, sifted; three pints of milk; one tablespoonful of melted butter; one teaspoonful of cream of tartar sifted in the flour; half a teaspoonful of soda sifted in the flour; one teaspoonful of salt; three eggs beaten light.

Mix, and bake in well-buttered waffle irons.

Rioe and Cornmeal Waffles. — One cupful of cold boiled rice; half a cupful of white flour, sifted, and the same of cornmeal; two eggs well beaten; milk to make a soft batter; one tablespoonful of melted butter; half a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water; one teaspoonful of salt.

Beat all well and smoothly together, and bake in wellgreased waffle irons.

Rice Waffles, No. 1. — One and a half cupfuls of boiled rice; two cupfuls of sifted flour; a little salt; two eggs well beaten.

Mix with milk to a batter rather thicker than pancake batter.

Rice Waffles, No. 2. — Half a pint of rice, picked, washed, boiled very soft, then drained, and allowed to cool; one and a half pints of flour sifted over the pan of rice; quarter of a pound of butter warmed at the fire; one quart of fresh milk; five eggs beaten light.

When you have sifted the flour into the rice, stir in the warmed butter and the salt; then stir the beaten eggs gradually into the milk; then beat all together, and bake in well-greased waffle irons; serve very hot.

Indian-Meal Waffles. — Half a pint of cornmeal; one pint of flour; One teacupful of cold boiled hominy; one egg; half a pint of sour milk; one pint of sweet milk; a pinch of soda.

Mix together smoothly and bake quickly. The secret of good waffles is very thin batter, very tight irons, and a very hot fire.

Indian Slappers. — One quart of Indian meal, sifted; two quarts of milk; four eggs well beaten; salt to taste.

Pour the milk boiling-hot over the Indian meal, and beat until quite smooth; then add the beaten eggs and salt; stir well together, and bake on a griddle.

Maryland Corn Cake. — One pint of Indian meal, sifted; a pinch of salt; enough rich milk to make a thin batter; one egg well beaten.

Mix smoothly, and bake on a griddle in thin cakes the size of a tea-plate. Butter and send to table hot.

Baltimore Indian Cake. — One cupful of flour, sifted; three quarters of a cupful of Indian meal, also sifted; one and a half cupfuls of rich milk; one teaspoonful of soda; one and a half teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar; one egg, well beaten up, with three tablespoonfuls of sifted sugar.

Little Indian Cakes. — One quart of Indian meal, sifted; two teaspoonfuls of salt; one tablespoonful of best lard. Mix the lard and meal together; pour boiling water on half the meal; stir it, add the rest, and as much cold water as will enable you to make it out in cakes of convenient size; bake on a baking-iron.

Cornmeal Muffins. — This quantity is for twelve muffins. One pint of cornmeal, sifted; one teaspoonful of salt; one teacupful of boiled rice, cold; a light handful of fine flour, sifted; one egg well beaten; one pint of buttermilk, or sour milk; one teaspoonful of soda; one tablespoonful of melted lard.

Dissolve the soda in the milk, and add the meal, egg, rice, and other ingredients. If the batter is too thick, add enough warm water to make the batter of the proper consistency. The lard should be added last. Bake quickly in hot, well-greased muffin-rings.

Corn Muffins. — Three pints of milk; as much cornmeal stirred in as will make a thick batter; two handfuls of wheat flour,sifted; two teaspoonfuls of salt; three eggs; one teacupful of yeast.

Warm the milk; stir in as much cornmeal as will make a thick batter; add the other ingredients; beat all well together; let it rise for six hours, then bake like other muffins.

Indian Muffins. — One quart of Indian meal, sifted; a quarter of a pound of butter; one pint of milk; half a teacupful of yeast; three eggs well beaten; one pinch of salt.

Warm the butter in the milk, and stir it into the meal, with enough warm water to make a batter; then add the eggs, yeast, and salt; stir well, and set it to rise; bake in large rings.

Corn Rusks. — One pint of Indian meal; one quart of boiling milk; half a teacupful of melted butter; pinch of salt; three eggs.

Scald the meal in the milk; add the butter, eggs, and enough flour to enable you to roll it out, and enough yeast to make the dough rise; set it to rise; roll it into little loaves,and bake brown.

Mary Anne's Indian Cafce. — One pint of sour milk; one cupful of Indian meal; two cupfuls of sifted flour; one egg; one teaspoonful of salt; one teaspoonful of soda; one tablespoonful of sugar.'

Mix all thoroughly, and bake half an hour.

Dinars Corn Cake. — One pint of milk; two cupfuls of Indian meal; two eggs; three tablespoonfuls of sugar; one teaspoonful of cream of tartar; one half teaspoonful of salt; one half teaspoonful of soda.

Bake in two pans in a quick oven for half an hour.

Aunt Ginny's Mush Cakes. — One pint of mush; one tablespoonful of lard; one gill of flour; one egg.

Beat well together, and drop from spoon on a hot griddle.

Granny's Corn Bread. — Two teacupfuls of boiled hominy; while hot, mix in one large spoonful of butter or lard; beat four eggs very light, and stir into the hominy; stir in gradually one pint of milk,a half a pint of sifted cornmeal, a teaspoonful of salt; the batter should be as thick as a rich boiled custard; add milk if thicker. Bake with a good deal of heat at the bottom of the oven, and not too much on top, so as to insure rising.

South Carolina Rice Johnny Cake, No. 1. — Equal proportions of fine hominy, rice, and rice flour. The two former must be boiled and cold before the rice flour is added. Mix all with milk; then spread on a board, and bake it before the fire. Split open and butter for the table.

Rice Johnny Cake, No. 2. — Half a pint of soft-boiled rice, with just enough flour to make the batter stick on a board; salt it, and spread it on a board; baste with cream or butter; cream is best; set it before a hot fire, and let it bake until nicely browned; then slip a thread under to disengage it from the board; turn, and bake the other side, basting continually.

Rice Pone. — One pint of nicely boiled rice; one pint of fresh milk; two ounces of fresh butter; a small teacupful of cornmeal; a teaspoonful of salt; three eggs well beaten; add the milk and rice to the beaten eggs; then the butter, cornmeal, and salt. Pour all in a wellbuttered baking-dish, and bake in a hot oven from half to three quarters of an hour.

Hot Cross Buns. — Three cupfuls of sweet milk; one cupful of yeast; flour to make a thick batter. Set this as a sponge overnight. In the morning add one cup of sugar; half a cupful of butter, melted; half a nutmeg, grated; one saltspoonful of salt; flour enough to roll out like biscuit; knead well, and set to rise for five hours; roll half an inch thick into round cakes; lay in rows in a buttered bakings pan; in half an hour make a deep cross on each with a knife, and instantly put into the oven ; bake a light brown; brush over with beaten white of egg, then dust with granulated sugar.

Sally Lunn. — One quart of finest white flour, sifted; four eggs; half a cupful of melted butter; one cupful of warm milk; one cupful of warm water; four tablespoonfuls of yeast; one teaspoonful of soda, dissolved in hot water; one teaspoonful of salt.

Beat the eggs to a stiff froth, adding the milk, water, butter,soda, and salt; stir in the flour to a smooth batter, and beat the yeast in well; set to rise in a deep buttered dish; it should rise six hours; then bake steadily three quarters of an hour. Eat hot.

Briache. — One pound of fine white flour, sifted; three ounces of butter; one teacupful of milk, warm; half a teacupful of home-made yeast; three eggs, beaten light; a saltspoonf ul of salt.

Mix all well together; make into a dough as soft as you can possibly knead it, and place the loaf in a well-buttered pan to rise; keep the pan closely covered, and let the dough rise four hours; then bake in a hot oven for thirty minutes. Briache is much better baked in small round cake-tins.

Popovers. — Two cupfuls of sifted flour; two cups uls of milk; two eggs; a piece of butter the size of a walnut; a little salt.

Mix all well together; put into buttered cups; fill half full, and bake in a quick oven.

Moonshine. — One quart of flour, sifted; two tablespoonfuls of butter; one tablespoonful of lard; half a teaspoonful of salt; enough cold water to enable you to mix all into a dough.

When it becomes the consistency of bread dough, beat it with a rolling-pin twenty minutes, holding the dough in the left hand while beating with the pin; roll it very thin, and cut with a fag-iron into long, thin strips; lay in a buttered baking-pan, and bake in a quick oven.

Virginia Quinimies. — One quart of sifted flour; two ounces of butter; one cupful of milk; oneteaspoonfulof salt.

Knead and pound well; roll out very thin — as thin as paper — cut into rounds, and bake them a pale brown in a quick oven.

Quinimies, No. 2 (Mme. Eugene). — Half a pint of cream; whites of two eggs; one tablespoonful of yeast.

Beat all together, adding flour enough to make a thin batter; bake in small square tins, well buttered.

Xantippe Johnny Cake. — One quart of milk; two eggs, well beaten; one piece each of lard and butter the size of an egg; one quart of milk; one tablespoonful of brown sugar; one teaspoonf ul of soda; two tablespoonfuls of flour; Indian meal enough to make a thick batter.

Melt the butter, and beat altogether for ten minutes; put in a buttered pan, and bake in a hot oven three quarters of an hour; test with a broom splint as for cake.

Maryland Pone. — Three eggs ; one pint of milk; piece of butter the size of a walnut; saltspoonf ul of soda; Indian meal enough to make it as thick as porridge.

Put about an inch deep in the tin^and bake in a quick oven.

GRIDDLE-CAKES.

GENERAL DIRECTIONS

Always bake griddle-cakes upon a soapstone griddle. Never allow the smallest drop of grease to fall upon a soapstone griddle, as it will spoil it for future use. If, however, you happen to be where soapstone griddles are not to be had, wash your iron griddle well with soap and water, dry thoroughly with a clean cloth, and then rub well with dry salt. Wipe off, heat the griddle, and grease with a piece of fat salt pork on a fork. Put on as little fat as possible. Test the griddle at first with a single cake. Turn the cakes always with a tin spatula, not with a knife. In preparing the batter for any griddle-cakes, beat it hard and long. This will make the cakes not only smooth, but light.

Buckwheat Cakes, No. 1. — Three quarts of water as warm as the hand can bear it (i. e., in winter); enough buckwheat meal to thicken the batter.

Beat it well until it is as smooth as velvet; add salt, and a teacupful of good fresh yeast; then beat again; cover the crock with a towel, and let it stand in a warm place — if the weather be cold, not far from the fire; in eight or ten hours it will be ready for use; the batter, when risen, should be so light and spongy that the cakes will rise quite thick; bake a fine brown on both sides; serve instantly on a hot plate. Remember that thin buckwheat cakes are not so good. The above quantity is enough for ten persons.

Buckwheat Cakes, No. 2. — One quart of buckwheat meal; two tablespoonfuls of wheat flour; one teacupful of good yeast; one pint of good milk; half a pint of warm water; one teaspoonful of salt; one tablespoonful of molasses.

Put the yeast in first, and mix it with the flour; then add the milk, water, salt, and molasses; beat long and well; set to rise in the evening, and bake for breakfast.

Buckwheat Cakes, No. 3. — One quart of warm water; one pound and five ounces of buckwheat meal; one large tablespoonful of salt; two large tablespoonfuls of brewer's yeast; one large tablespoonful of molasses.

Beat well, and set to rise in a warm place for two and a half hours; then bake as above.

New England Breakfast Pancakes. — One pint of sour milk; soda enough to sweeten it; a little salt; one tablespoonful of molasses; flour enough to make a stiff batter.

Mix, and bake as usual.

Indian-Meal Batter Cakes. — One quart of bolted Indian meal; one teaeupful of flour; one quart of milk; one teaspoonful of salt; four teaspoonfuls of yeast; three eggs.

Put the yeast and salt into the milk when quite warm, add the eggs, and then stir in the flour and meal; let it rise all night, and, if it sours, add one teaspoonful of soda; bake on a griddle.

Corn Griddle-Cakes. — One quart of rich milk; three eggs; a teaspoonful of salt; a spoonful of wheat flour; enough cornmeal to make a thin batter (the thinner the better).

Bake on the griddle in small cakes, butter them, and send them hot to table.

Indian-Meal Flannel Cakes. — One pint of fine Indian

meal; one pint of wheat flour; one teaspoonful of salt; two gills of yeast.

Mix the wheat flour and Indian meal together with as much tepid water as will make a thin batter; add the yeast and salt, and let rise all night.

Virginia Batter Griddle-Cakes. — One cupful of wheat flour, sifted; one cupful of white Indian meal; one tablespoouful of butter, melted, and added in the morning; one teaspoonful of soda, dissolved in hot water, and added in the morning; one quart of milk; four tablespoonfuls of yeast; one teaspoonful of salt.

Mix overnight, adding in the morning the butter and soda; bake on a very hot griddle.

Grandpa's Favorites (" Common-Sense in the Household"). — One quart of milk; two cupfuls of stale bread crumbs; one good handful of flour; one tablespoonful of melted butter; three eggs well beaten; one teaspoonful of salt.

Work the bread and milk smooth; add the butter and eggs, then the salt, and just enough flour to bind all; if too thick, add milk; beat hard and long, and bake at once on a hot griddle.

Rice Flour or Velvet Cakes. — One pint of milk; one pint of cream; three eggs, the whites and yolks beaten separately, and very stiff; one teaspoonful of salt; rice flour.

Mix the beaten yolks with the milk; add the salt, then the rice flour, and then the whites; beat smooth, and bake instantly.

Cream Cakes. — One pint of cream; one pint of milk, slightly sour; four eggs, the whites and yolks beaten separately; one teaspoonful of soda, dissolved in hot water; one teaspoonful of salt; flour to make a good batter, well stirred in.

Beat smooth, and bake at once.

Flannel Cakes, No. 1. — To one pint of flour add two eggs well beaten; four tablespoonfuls of mashed small hominy well boiled and only lukewarm; a little yeast, and milk enough for a stiff batter.

Make them up at bedtime, and if you find them a little sour, put in some saleratus.

Flannel Cakes, No. 2. — One quart of milk; two eggs, the yolks and whites beaten separately; flour to make a consistent batter; one spoonful of melted butter; one teaspoonful of soda; one teaspoonful of cream of tartar.

Mix the flour and milk; then a little salt and the beaten yolks; then the melted butter, and soda and cream of tartar, dissolved in milk; beat thoroughly, add the beaten whites of the eggs, and bake immediately.

Vanity Griddle-Cakes. — One quart of flour, sifted; one teaspoonful of soda; a little salt.

Mix with sour cream to a thin batter, and beat hard for eight minutes; pour on a hot griddle in thin cakes, and fry them quickly.

Graham Cakes. — Two enpfnls of brown flour; one cupful of white flour; three cupfuls of buttermilk; three eggs beaten very light; one full teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water; one teaspoonful of salt; one heaping tablespoonful of lard.

Mix and beat well, and bake immediately.

Eye and Indian Griddle-Cakes. — Half a pint of Indian meal, scalded soft with milk; half a pint of rye meal, stirred into the above when cold; half a tablespoonful of molasses.

Beat as usual; the batter should be a little thicker than for buckwheats; bake as soon as mixed.

Hominy. Pancakes. — One pint of boiled hominy; one tablespoonful of butter; three eggs beaten light; one pint of sour milk; one teaspoonful of soda.

Put the butter and eggs into the hominy while warm, then add the milk and soda; beat smooth; if not thick enough,add cornstarch to bind it; bake in a well-greased pan.

Cream Pancakes. — One pint of rich cream; eight eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately; one whole nutmeg, grated fine; a pinch of salt; half a pound of butter, melted ; flour enough to make an ordinary batter.

Fry in butter; before serving, strew sugar over them, and garnish the dish with preserve.

Mary Anne's Pancakes. — One quart of new milk; eight eggs; one pound of the finest white flour, sifted.

Stir the milk into the eggs, which should previously be beaten very light; sift into this the flour very gradually; beat smooth, adding a tiny pinch of salt; fry brown on both sides, in butter; serve hot, with powdered cinnamon, sugar, and nutmeg.

Swedish Pancakes. — One pint of the finest white flour, sifted; six eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately to the utmost; one saltspoonful of salt; one saltspoonful of soda dissolved in vinegar; milk to make a thin batter.

Beat the yolks light, add the salt, soda, two cupfuls of milk, then the flour, and beaten whites alternately; thin with more milk if necessary.

Swedish Pancakes, with Jam. — Proceed as above, but spread each pancake, when fried, very thickly with raspberry jam, and roll up nicely; serve with cream sauce, or Old Humphrey's aigre-doux sauce. 'Of course, you may use any preserve you like, but in Sweden raspberry jam and pancakes are always used together.

DESSERT PANCAKES, DUMPLINGS, AND FRITTERS.

GENERAL DIRECTIONS FOR FRYING FRITTERS AND PANCAKES.

Fry fritters in deep, round-bottomed saucepan of boiling butter or lard, testing the heat by dropping a spoonful in to try. It ought to rise instantly to the surface puffed up, and should be of a rich, golden brown. Fry carefully, remove with a perforated skimmer, drain on soft paper or old, soft linen, pile on a hot plate, dust with powdered sugar, and serve. Use rather a small, and not too old a frying-pan for frying pancakes; heat it, put in a teaspoonful or two of lard, and run it over the bottom very quickly; then pour in enough batter to cover the bottom of the saucepan with a thin sheet; turn carefully with a tin spatula, lay in a hot dish, dust with powdered sugar, roll up quickly, and serve.

White Dumplings. — Beef suet, freed from strings, and powdered fine; double the quantity of the finest white flour, sifted.

Make into dumplings, tie up in floured bags, and boil six hours; put them aside until you are ready to use them; then put them on a tin plate, and bake them brown in the oven; eat them hot with buckwheat cakes.

Apple Dumplings. — Two pounds of the finest white flour, sifted; three quarters of a pound of fresh butter; a pinch of salt; fine, large pippins, pared and cored.

Make the dough in a sheet thicker than for pies; fill the hollowed core of each apple with loaf sugar ; envelop each apple in dough, pinching the dough together to close the seams, and rolling with floured hands into a ball; tie up each one in a little dumpling cloth; boil one hour, turn out, and eat hot with hard sauce.

Molasses Dumplings. — One pound of the finest white flour, sifted; six ounces of good butter; three or four spoonfuls of baking-powder; a pinch of salt.

Make up the dough with a little water, roll into thick cakes, and boil twenty minutes in equal quantities of molasses and water.

Baked Apple Dumplings. — Make the paste in the usual manner; pare and core the apples; fill the hollowed core of each one with sugar, cinnamon, and lemon peel; wrap each one carefully in paste of the usual thickness; put them to bake in a dish or pan, with a little sugar and water at the bottom; bake in a moderate oven, and baste them occasionally; serve with wine sauce.

Potato-Crust Dumplings. — Two quarts of sifted white flour; fourteen white potatoes.

Boil, peel, and mash the potatoes fine; sift the flour into the potatoes gradnallj7, mixing them well together with the hand; add enough water to make a stiff dough, and a pinch of salt; roll out on the paste-board into as thick a sheet as you wish, and use for apple, peach, plum, or any other kind of fruit dumpling. All dumplings should be tied securely in well-floured dumpling cloths.

Apple Fritters. — One quart of milk; six eggs, yolks only, well beaten; three quarters of a pound of sifted flour; a pinch of salt; six tablespoonfuls of chopped apples.

Beat the yolks well, stir them into the milk, and add, by degrees, the flour and salt; beat the batter hard and long, have it prepared some time before they are cooked, and from time to time beat it a little; just before frying beat in the chopped apple; fry in a deep saucepan of boiling lard, dropping it in by spoonfuls; serve hot with any sauce you prefer.

Orange Fritters. — One pound of flour, light weight; yolks and whites of three eggs beaten separately; a pinch of salt; grated rind of two oranges.

Stir the flour into water until it makes a thick batter; add the salt, beat it well, then beat in the beaten yolks of the eggs, lastly the stiffly beaten whites; proceed as for apple fritters, beating in the orange peel (lightly grated) last of all; fry as above and serve hot, with hard sauce flavored with orange juice.

Passover Fritters. — Passover biscuit, soaked all night in cold water and beaten to a pulp; four to six eggs,according to the quantity of biscuit; half a teaspoonful of powdered cinnamon; two tablespoonfuls of Sultana raisins seeded and chopped; sugar to taste.

Sweeten the mashed biscuit to taste, whip in the already well-beaten eggs, add the cinnamon and raisins, beat the batter light, and fry as above.

Dinah's Fritters. — A loaf of stale bread rolled into crumbs and browned; four eggs very well beaten; four tablespoonfuls of Madeira.

Beat all well together into a light batter, adding a little milk if necessary; fry as above, and eat with any sauce you prefer.

Rice Fritters. — Two teacupfuls of rice well boiled; three eggs beaten very light; some sifted flour, enough to bind all together; a pinch of salt.

Beat all well together, and fry as usual.

Golden Ball Fritters. — One pint of water; a piece of butter the size of an egg; one pint of flour; six eggs beaten very light.

Put the butter into the water, let it boil a few moments, then thicken it smoothly with flour; let it remain a short time on the fire, stirring steadily all the time, then pour into a bowl, and mix with it six eggs beaten very light; beat the batter hard and long; fry in a deep saucepan, stirring the butter or lard hard until it whirls; then drop in the fritters by spoonfuls, and fry as round as balls.

,i>Thanksgiving Fritters. — One quart of rich milk; six eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately and very light; three cupfuls of flour sifted; half a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water; one teaspoonful of cream of tartar sifted into the flour; a little salt.

Beat the milk into the already beaten yolks, then add in order the soda, the flour, and salt, finally the whites; beat very hard, and when just ready to fry beat in some apple prepared as follows: Six large juicy apples pared, cut into thin quarters or eighths, and stewed in a covered saucepan with one wineglassful of brandy, one tablespoonful of white sugar, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, two wineglassfuls of water; when half stewed drain off the liquor, and when cold beat into the batter; fry as round as balls, dust with powdered sugar, and serve.

Cake Fritters. — Stale cake cut into rounds or squares, and lightly fried in lard to a nice brown.

Dip each slice, when fried, in boiling milk, drain quickly, spread with preserve, and pile on a hot dish; serve with cream sauce.

Pink Fritters. — One cupful of cake crumbs, light and dry; one cupful of boiling milk; four eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately; two tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar; one teaspoonful of corn-starch moistened with cold milk; three tablespoonfuls of currant jelly.

Soak the crumbs in the boiling milk, and stir in the corn-starch; heat all together to a boil, stirring steadily; beat the yolks light, and when the custard cools whip in the beaten yolks, the sugar, jelly, and beaten whites; fry as round as balls.

Boulettes. — Three eggs; three tablespoonfuls of sour cream; one spoonful of butter; one pinch of salt.

Cream the butter; add the eggs and sour cream; enough flour to make a paste; add the salt; take a spoonful of the paste and throw it into boiling water; cook until the bouleUe rises to the surface; eat it with melted butter, or any berries.

Paste for Fritters. — Put some flour in a dish; make a hole in the centre and break in one or two yolks of eggs; a spoonful of olive-oil, and one tablespoonful of brandy; a pinch of salt; stir it always in the same direction, adding by degrees a little water, to make it the proper consistency; just before you need it, stir in the white of the egg, beaten very stiff. It is best to prepare it the evening before; it becomes lighter. If it is for sweet fritters, put very little salt, and add a little orange-flower water.

Spanish Pain Perdu, or Tortillas — Take slices of stale white bread half an inch thick, steep in water, take them out and dry them, then put into a saucepan, cover and heat them; when they have swelled very much, fry in butter or the finest olive-oil; serve with chocolate.

German or Queen's Toast. — Slices of light, white, stale bread, cut in rounds, fried, dipped in boiling milk to remove the grease, drained, dusted with powdered sugar, and piled on a hot plate; pour sweet wine sauce over them, and serve hot. Stale loaf cake is very nice treated in this way.

CAKE.

GENERAL DIRECTIONS.

Cake will not rise if the oven is too slow; but, on the other hand, if the oven be too hot, the cake burns on the outside. A large fruit-cake needs a very slow, steady fire. Small cakes baked in tins or pans do not need so hot a fire as large cakes. Where a great deal of molasses or sugar is used, a more moderate fire than for pound or sponge cake is necessary. A good way to test the oven is to drop a little flour on the bottom of it. If it browns, the oven will be hot enough.

Large cakes should be baked in earthen pans; metal pans heat too quickly, and are apt to burn the cake. It is well always to have a paper at the bottom of the pan. While baking, if it is doing too fast on the top, spread a paper over it.

Raisins must always be stoned, and currants, well washed and picked. Currants require many waters, and, in rinsing, a stream should run upon them through a colander. When washed, place a towel on a waiter, and spread the currants on it, rubbing them to and fro; remove them to another towel and rub again; then put them in a dish, and pick them over carefully.

In using baking-powders, mix them with the flour. These powders should be made use of with discretion, as they are apt to impart an alkaline flavor.

Flour should be dry, and sifted through a hair sieve.

The yolks and whites of eggs should be beaten separately, and the whites to the stiffest froth. Stale and fresh eggs should never be used in the same cake.

Good butter should always be used for cake.

It is best not to move cake after it is once in the oven.

Also, be careful not to let in a stream of cold air when you open the oven door.

In testing a cake to see if it is baked enough, run a broom splint or skewer through it. If it is not done enough, some of the dough will adhere to it; if done, it will come out clean.

Cakes that are fried must be plunged into deep vessels of boiling lard. Try the lard first with a small piece of dough. Drop the cakes in; as they brown on the under side, turn them over with a skimmer. Let them be laid on paper in the bottom of a dish, when taken from the hot lard, that the grease may be absorbed.

Dream Cake. — Three quarters of a cupful of butter; two cupfuls of sugar, sifted; half a cupful of milk; two and a half cupfuls of pastry flour; half a teaspoonful of soda; one and a half teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar; the whites of eight eggs beaten stiff; one teaspoonful of almond extract.

Mix the soda and cream of tartar with the flour; rub the butter to a cream; add the sugar and beat again; add the milk and flour alternately, a little at a time, and beat well; lastly, add the beaten whites and the almond; bake in three shallow pans.

Make a frosting as follows: The whites of three eggs; three cupfuls of confectioner's sugar, sifted.

Put the eggs in a large bowl, sprinkle with three teaspoonfuls of sugar, beat with a perforated spoon, and add three teaspoonfuls of sugar every five minutes; then divide into three parts; leave one white, and flavor it with almond or vanilla; color, another pink, and flavor it with rose; color, another yellow, and flavor it with orange or lemon; then put a layer of icing at least an inch thick on each cake; put them together, ice all over again lightly with white icing, and sprinkle with grated cocoanut.

To color the pink icing use cochineal, adding it slowly till of the desired shade. To color orange, grate the thin rind of an orange, and soak it half an hour in three or four teaspoonfuls of orange juice; strain and use.

Almond Loaf Cake. — One pound of powdered sugar; one pound of flour; one quarter of a pound of butter; eight eggs; one coffeecupful of almonds, blanched, pounded to a paste with rosewater and half a teaspoonful of essence of bitter almonds.

Beat the whites and )-olks separately; stir the butter and sugar to a cream; add to this the yolks; beat light and smooth before putting in the flour; stir in the almondpaste alternately with the whites; put in half a coffeespoonful of brandy, last of all; bake in a round pan; ice thickly with California boiled icing, flavored strongly with rosewater and colored pink with cochineal. If properly made, baked, and iced, this is a delicious cake.

Pistachio-nut Cake. — Make and bake a White Mountain jelly cake; then, for the filling, use pistachio nuts, prepared and ground fine as for pistachio cream, and beaten up with white of egg and sugar, as usual; color the filling a delicate green with essence of spinach; when the cake is properly arranged and filled, ice it completely with icing colored green in the same way. This is an excellent cake.

Caramel Cake. — Three cupfuls of sugar, sifted; one cupful and a half of butter; one cupful of milk; four and a half cupfuls of flour; five eggs, well beaten; a small teaspoonful of soda; two small teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar; mix and bake as jelly cake. For the filling, take three cupfuls of burned sugar; half a cupful of milk; one teaspoonful of butter; one tablespoonful of browned flour; two tablespoon fuls of cold water.

Boil this mixture five minutes, then add three tablespoonfuls of sweet almonds, roasted and ground to powder; boil until it is of the consistency of rich custard; add a pinch of soda, stir well, and remove from the fire; when cold, spread between the layers of cake; ice with almond icing.

Lemon Cake. — One heaping cupful of butter; two scant cupful of sugar; ten eggs, the whites and yolks beaten separately; one small cupful of milk; the juice and rind (grated) of a large lemon; one small teaspoonful of soda; flour to make a tolerably thin batter.

Bake in a quick oven, and ice with lemon icing.

Almond Cake. — One pound of almonds, blanched, beaten to a fine paste in a mortar, and moistened with orangeflower water; yolks of twelve eggs well beaten; whites of six eggs well beaten; two bitter almonds pounded to a fine paste; rind of two large lemons, grated fine; doublerefined sugar to taste, beaten into the eggs.

Bake in a tin pan well floured.

Hickory-nut Cake. — Two cupfuls of white sugar, sifted; half a teacupful of butter; one teacupful of sweet milk; three eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately and well; three cupfuls of sifted flour; one cupful of hickory-nut kernels, blanched; two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar mixed with the flour; one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in the milk.

Bake in small heart-shaped tins.

Thanksgiving Cake. — Eight pounds of the finest white flour, sifted; four pounds of sugar, sifted; three pounds of butter; two pounds of Sultana raisins, seeded and dredged; two pounds of currants, well washed, picked, and dredged; nutmeg, mace, and cinnamon to taste, all powdered.

Raise this cake with yeast; of this it will require rather more than for the same quantity of bread; mix in half the sugar and shortening when you put in the yeast; when well raised, add the remainder with the spice; work it well, and set it to rise again; when it has risen a second time add the fruit and a teaspoonful of dissolved soda; put it in the pans, and let it stand only a few moments before baking.

Boston Cup Cake. — Three teacupfuls of sifted sugar and one and a half teacupful of butter, beaten together to a smooth, white cream; three eggs well beaten, whites and yolks separately, and added to the above; three teacupfuls of sifted flour, put in next; flavoring to taste.

Dissolve a teacupf ul of saleratus in a teacupf ul of milk, and strain it into the cake; then add three more teacupfuls of sifted flour; bake the cake immediately, either in cups or pans.

Buckeye Cake. — Three teacupfuls of white sugar, sifted; one teacupf ul of butter; four teacupfuls of flour; six eggs well beaten; two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, sifted in the flour; one teaspoonf ul of soda.

Beat very light, and bake in tin pans.

Coffee Cake. — One cupful of seeded and chopped raisins; one cupful of sugar; half a cupful of butter; half 'a cupful of cold coffee (strong); half a cupful of molasses; two and a half cupfuls of sifted flour; two eggs well beaten; one teaspoonful of powdered cloves; half a teaspoonful of cinnamon.

Maine Cream Cake. — Prepare several layers of jelly cake, as for " White Mountain Cake," but, instead of spreading with jelly, use the following: Half a pint of rich, sweet milk, one egg well beaten, two small teaspoonfuls of cornstarch wet with cold milk, and half a cupful of sifted sugar. Heat the milk to boiling, and stir in the corn-starch; take out a little and mix gradually with the beaten egg and sugar; return to the rest of the custard and boil, stirring constantly until quite thick; flavor to taste; when cold, spread between the layers of cake; then ice thickly, flavoring the icing as you do the cream filling.

Bachelor's Cake. — One pound of flour, sifted; six ounces of butter; six ounces of sugar; half a pound of Sultana raisins, seeded and chopped; half a pound of currants, picked, washed, and dredged; two eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately to the utmost; one large breakfast cupful of sweet milk; one teaspoonful of cinnamon; one teaspoonful of soda.

Sift the soda into the dry flour; cream the butter and sugar; add the beaten eggs, then the milk, then the spice, lastly the flour and fruit; bake in round tins.

Lightning Express Cake. — One cupful of flour, sifted; one cupful of powdered sugar; four eggs well beaten; half a teaspoonful of soda; one teaspoonful of cream of tartar; flavoring to taste.

Butter the pan well, and, if the oven is in good trim, this cake will bake in fifteen minutes.

Dinah's Cup Cake. — One cupful of butter; two cupfuls of sugar, sifted; three scant cupfuls of flour, sifted; four eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately to the very utmost; one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in two thirds of a cupful of sweet milk, or half a cupful of sour cream; two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, mixed with the flour.

The cream of tartar is not to be used if the sour cream is used.

Dinah's Cream Cake. — One pound of sugar, sifted; half a pound of butter; one pound of flour, sifted; five eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately to the utmost; seven tablespoonfuls of thick, sweet cream; five drops of essence of bitter almond; half a teaspoonful of saleratus added the last thing.

Bake in jeily-cake tins, and put between the layers the following filling: One cupful of sugar (loaf), one cupful of cold water, grated rind of one lemon and the juice, and two tablespoonfuls of cornstarch dissolved in cold water. Put the sugar and water on the fire, and when the sugar is dissolved add the lemon juice and grated rind; allow it to come to a boil, and add the cornstarch, stirring it in a little at a time; allow it to boil up once, take it from the fire, and set away to cool. It is a delicious filling for Dinah's cream cake.

Small, Rich Plum (Cake.--- Three quarters of a pound of butter; three quarters of a pound of sifted sugar; three quarters of a pound of sifted flour; ten eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately; half a nutmeg, grated; one teaspoonful of pounded mace; three quarters of a pound of Sultana raisins, seeded and chopped; three quarters of a pound of currants, picked, washed, and dredged; half a pound of mixed candied peels, snipped fine; one wineglassful of brandy.

Mix as usual, adding the fruit and brandy last; bake two hours.

Cocoanut Cake. — One cupful of sifted sugar; half a cupful of sweet milk; one egg; two teaspoonfuls of butter; one heaped teaspoonful of cream of tartar; one teaspoonful of soda; enough sifted flour to make a batter as thick as for griddle cakes.

Bake it in four cakes on jelly-cake tins. For filling take one cupful of grated cocoanut, one cupful of sifted sugar, half a cupful of sweet milk; two eggs well beaten. Mix all together, cook for five minutes, and put between the layers of cake; ice with the quick icing, into which you have beaten a very little grated cocoanut; flavor the icing with lemon juice.

Loaf Cocoanut Cake. — One pound of sugar; half a pound of butter; six eggs well beaten; half a pound of flour; one pound of grated cocoanut, stirred lightly in the last thing.

Mix smoothly, beat hard, and bake immediately.

White Cocoanut Cake. — One cupful of butter; two cupfuls of powdered sugar; three cupfuls of flour; four eggs, whites only, whipped to the utmost; one cupful of milk; one teaspoonful of cream of tartar and half a teaspoonful of soda sifted into the flour; half of a small cocoanut grated fine, stirred in last of all; a pinch of soda.

Beat all well together, and bake in tins.

Chocolate Cake. — Two cupfuls of sugar, sifted; four cupfuls of flour, sifted; two tablespoonfuls of butter; four eggs well beaten; one cupful of rich milk; two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar; one teaspoonful of soda; flavor with vanilla.

Bake in jelly-cake tins. This quantity will make two cakes in three layers. For filling take half a cupful of grated chocolate, the yolk of one egg, powdered sugar to taste, and milk enough to make it moist. Mix all together, flavor with vanilla, and beat it slowly until quite smooth; ice with chocolate icing.

Christmas Cake. — This cake is very dark and delicious. Dry some fine white flour, then brown it slowly, stirring all the time in a shallow pan on top of the stove; let it cool, then sift it for use. It should be of an even tint — fawn-colored. Take of this flour one and a half pounds, and mix with it one tablespoonful of finely pulverized charcoal, and sift it twice; take, also, six pounds of stoned raisins, five pounds of washed, picked, and dried currants, six bitter almonds pounded in a mortar, two pounds of blanched and chopped sweet almonds, one and a half pounds of brown sugar, sifted, one and a half pounds of butter, two pounds of citron, eight ounces each of candied orange and lemon peel, two ounces of powdered cinnamon, one large nutmeg, grated, half an ounce of powdered cloves, half an ounce of powdered mace, two gills of brandy, one pint of black molasses, one teaspoonful of salt, half a teaspoonful of carbonate of soda, the juice and peel of two oranges, the juice and peel of two lemons, nineteen eggs, and four ounces of the best chocolate, grated; cream the butter and sugar; add the yolks of eggs, well beaten; also the spice, brandy, salt, juice, and grated lemon and orange peel; mix the chocolate with the flour, and stir it in; of this, however, reserve one gill; add to the batter now the whites of the eggs, which must previously have been beaten stiff; when these have been well beaten in, add the soda dissolved in a little hot water; lastly, add the fruit and almonds, dredged thoroughly, with the gill of flour; mix all smoothly and thoroughly, and then beat long and hard; when beaten smooth and light, put into a large pan well papered and buttered, and bake for four or five hours at least. If possible, send it to a baker.

Fruit Cake, Plain. — One pound of powdered sugar; one pound of the finest white flour, sifted; one pound of butter; seven eggs; half a pound of currants, washed, picked, cleaned, and dredged; half a pound of raisins, seeded, chopped, and dredged; quarter of a pound of citron, cut into the thinnest possible slips; one teaspoonful of nutmeg; one teaspoonful of cinnamon; one glassful of brandy; cream, butter, and sugar.

Add the beaten yolks, then the spice and the whipped whites alternately with the flour, the fruit and brandy last.

ficlairs of Chocolate, Cream, etc. — Have ready a set of small Sclair tins, five inches long and two wide, round at the bottom, and connected by strips of tin; butter these tins well, and then proceed to make the eclairs as follows: Four eggs well beaten, weight of the eggs in sugar, half the weight in flour, sifted, quarter of a teaspoonful of soda and half a teaspoonful of cream of tartar sifted well into the flour. Beat up the batter well, put a spoonful into each tin, and bake in a steady oven; when nearly cold cover the rounded side with a caramel icing made as follows: Two cupfuls of brown sugar, one cupful of molasses, one heaping tablespoonful of butter, and three tablespoonfuls of flour; boil twenty-five minutes, stir in half a pound of grated chocolate, wet in one cupful of sweet milk, and boil until it hardens on the spoon; flavor to taste with vanilla. For cream eclairs proceed as above, but lay two stairs together, and fill the hollow between the two with creamcake filling.

Plain Loaf Cake. — Three cupfuls of light dough, taken when the bread is ready to be moulded; one large cupful of sifted sugar; half a cupful of butter; two eggs well beaten; one cupful of Sultana raisins, seeded, chopped, and dredged; one small nutmeg, grated; one teaspoonful of cinnamon, and the same of allspice; half a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in a tablespoonful of milk.

Warm the butter at the fire, and mix thoroughly and smoothly with the dough; then beat the eggs and sugar together and add them to the dough, then the soda, spice, and fruit; beat all well together, then pour it into deep tins, buttered, and let stand until it becomes quite light before baking.

Queen's Cakes. — One and a half cupfuls of loaf sugar, pounded and sifted; half a cupful of butter; half a cupful of sweet milk; three eggs beaten light, whites and yolks separately; one teaspoonful of sherry or Madeira wine; two and a half cupfuls of flour, sifted; one pinch of saleratus.

Mix as usual, and bake in small, round tins; ice thickly.

Dinars Spice Cake. — One pound of sifted flour; one pound of sifted sugar; half a pound of butter; one teacupful of cream (or sour milk); one teaspoonful of soda; one teaspoonful of cloves; one teaspoonful of nutmeg; one teaspoonful of cinnamon; one teaspoonful of grated lemon peel; one pound of Sultana raisins, seeded and chopped.

Mix as usual, putting in the raisins last.

Dinah;'s Fruit Cake. — One pound of flour, sifted; one pound of butter; one pound.of sugar, sifted; two pounds of currants, picked, washed, and dredged; three pounds of Sultana raisins, seeded, chopped, and dredged; quarter of a pound of orange, lemon, and citron peel, cut fine; twelve eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately; two nutmegs, grated; ope tablespoonful of pounded cloves, mace, and cinnamon; one teaspoonful of soda; one small teacupful of molasses; the juice of one lemon; half a pint of brandy.

Mix as usual, adding the lemon juice, fruit, and brandy last.

Continental Fruit Cake. — One pound of butter; one pound of powdered sugar, sifted; one and a half pounds of the finest white flour, sifted; three quarters of a pound of stoned raisins; three quarters of a pound of currants, well washed and picked; half a pound of citron cut in small pieces; eight eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately to the utmost; one teacupful of cream; one wineglassful of brandy; one wineglassful of wine; one nutmeg, grated; one teaspoonful of powdered mace; one teaspoonful of powdered cloves; two teaspoonfuls of powdered cinnamon; one saltspoonful of salt; two teaspoonfuls of yeast powder mixed with the flour.

Beat the yolks of the eggs with the butter and sugar, add the cream, then beat in a quarter of the flour, add the beaten whites very gradually, and the rest of the flour a little at a time; beat smooth; then add the wine, brandy, and spice, then the fruit gradually; then beat all well together, put into a buttered pan, and bake with paper round the pan and on top in a steady, quick, but not too hot oven. It will require about an hour.

Republican Cake. — One pound of flour, sifted; three quarters of a pound of sugar, brown or white, sifted; half a pound of butter; six eggs; one teacupful of cream; one teaspoonful of saleratus; flavoring to taste.

Beat together thoroughly, and bake in a moderate oven.

Cream Sponge Cake. — One cupful of sugar, half a cupful of cream, three eggs, one cupful of sifted flour, and half a teaspoonful of soda.

Beat very light, and bake slowly.

Dark Loaf Cake (Old Humphrey). — Two and a quarter cupfuls of sifted flour; one cupful of brown sugar; half a cupful of butter; half a cupful of milk; two eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately to the stiffest possible froth; half a teaspoonful of ground cloves; half a nutmeg, grated; half a teaspoonful of cinnamon; one cupful of Sultana raisins, seeded and chopped; half a cupful of molasses; half a teaspoonful of cream of tartar; quarter of a teaspoonful of soda.

Cream the butter and sugar, put with them the yolks beaten light, then add the milk and beat very hard before putting in the flour, into which the cream of tartar and soda should previously have been sifted; beat again, and add the spice and whites of the eggs, then the molasses, and lastly the raisins; bake in buttered tins, and test, as usual, with a straw. This is an old-fashioned and capital cake.

Lee Cake. — Ten eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately; one pound of sugar; half a pound of flour; two lemons.

To all the yolks, and the whites of seven eggs, add the sugar, the rind of two lemons (grated), and the juice of one; bake as for jelly cake. To the whites of three eggs, allow a pound and a quarter of powdered sugar; beat stiff as for icing, take out enough to cover the top of the cake, and set aside; add to the rest the juice, pulp (freed from skin and strings), and half the grated rind of a large orange; beat smooth, and when the cake is nearly cold, spread this between the layers; beat into the icing reserved for the top a little lemon juice.

Lincoln Cake. — One pound of butter; one pound of sugar; one pound of flour; six eggs well beaten, whites and yolks separately; two cupfuls of sour cream; one grated nutmeg; one teaspoonful of powdered cinnamon; one tablespoonful of rose water; one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water, and stirred into the milk just before adding it to the cake.

Cream the butter and sugar, add the whipped yolks, then the cream and spice, next the flour, then the rose water, and a double handful of citron cut into slips and dredged; finally the beaten whites of the eggs; stir all well, and bake in a card-shaped buttered tin.

Dover Cake. — One pound of flour; one pound of white sugar; half a pound of butter, rubbed with the sugar to a very light cream; six eggs well beaten, whites and yolks separately; one cupful of sweet milk; one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in vinegar; one teaspoonful of powdered cinnamon; one tablespoonful of rose water.

Mix all well together, then bake in round tins, well buttered." Ice with almond icing.

Pound Cake. — One pound of flour; one pound of eggs; one pound of sugar; three quarters of a pound of butter; one wineglassf ul of best brandy; one nutmeg, grated; one teaspoonful of mace.

Cream half the flour with the butter, and add brandy and spice; beat the yolks until light, add the sugar, then the beaten whites, and the rest of the flour alternately; when this is thoroughly mixed, put all together, and heat steadily for half an hour; flavor the icing of this cake with rose water.

Jelly Cake. — To make jelly cake, it is necessary to have the round, flat tins that are made for this purpose. Then make a batter exactly like that for White Mountain cake, and bake in the buttered tins; each layer should not be more than half an inch thick; when baked, lay them to cool on a marble slab or flat table, so that they may not warp; when cold, spread on the lower one a thick layer of some acid jelly, then place a layer of cake on the top of this, and proceed in this way until you have piled up all; four layers are enough for a cake; ice the top thickly.

Vermont Orange Cake. — One and a half cupfuls of sugar; half a cupful of butter, stirred to a cream; half a cupful of milk ; two teaspoonfuls of baking-powder, stirred into enough sifted flour to make a fairly stiff batter; yolks of three eggs, and whites of two ; grated rind of an orange.

Bake in jelly-cake tins, and, when done, spread between each layer a mixture made of the stiffly beaten white of one egg, the juice of a large orange, and enough powdered sugar to thicken as for icing.

Florida Orange Cake. — Two cupfuls of sugar; two cupfuls of flour; half a cupful of water; juice and rind of one lemon ; yolks of five eggs and whites of four; one teaspoonful of cream of tartar; half a teaspoonful of'soda.

When the batter is light, bake it in jelly-cake tins, then beat the reserved white to the stiffest possible froth with half a cupful of sugar, finely powdered, and the grated rind, juice, and pulp of a large orange. Proceed as

Silver Cake. — One and a half cupfuls of sugar (teacups); half a cupful of milk; half a cupful of butter; two cupfuls of flour, sifted; bitter-almond flavoring; whites of four eggs, beaten to a stiff froth.

Cream butter and sugar, then add the milk and flavoring, then the flour, lastly the eggs, stirring continually; beat hard and long, and bake in brick-shaped tins.

Gold Cake. — Should be made on the same day with silver cake. Two cupfuls of white sugar, sifted (teacups); one cupful of butter; three cupfuls of sifted flour; yolks of seven eggs, beaten to the utmost; white of one egg, beaten to the utmost; half a cupful of milk; piece of one small lemon and half the grated rind.

Mix and bake as usual. Both silver and gold cake should be iced thickly.

Marble Cake. — Light: One cupful of white sugar; half a cupful of butter; half a cupful of milk; two cupfuls of flour'; whites of three eggs,beaten very stiff; one teaspoonful of cream of tartar; half a teaspoonful of soda. Dark: Half a cupful of brown sugar ; quarter of a cupful of butter; half a cupful of molasses; quarter of a cupful of milk; two cupfuls of flour; yolks of three eggs; half a nutmeg, grated; one teaspoonful of allspice; one teaspoonful of ammonia; one teaspoonful of soda; one teaspoonful of cream of tartar.

Butter your mould, and put in the dark and light batters in alternate layers.

Madison's Whim Cake. — One and a half pounds of sugar; one and three quarter pounds of finest white flour, sifted; three quarters of a pound of butter; six eggs, well beaten, whites and yolks separately; one pound of Sultana raisins, seeded and chopped; one pound of curerants, well washed, picked, and dredged; one pint of rich milk; twelve cloves ground to powder; half a nutmeg, grated; one coffeespoonf ul each of wine, brandy, and rose water.

Cream the butter and sugar, add the beaten yolks, then the spice and whipped whites alternately with the flour, and the milk, the fruit, and flavoring last; beat well until very smooth and light; bake in a large pan.

Pound Cake (Mrs. Washington's). — Forty eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately to the utmost; four pounds of butter; four pounds of fine white sugar, sifted; fivei pounds of fine white flour, sifted; five pounds of raisins, currants, and citron, stoned, cleaned, and cut; half an ounce of grated nutmeg; one pint of white wine; one wineglassful of French brandy.

Beat the whites to the stiffest possible froth ; then work four pounds of butter to a cream; when smooth put the whites to it, a spoonful at a time, then the sugar in the same manner, then the beaten yolks, the flour, fruit, and flavoring; bake two hours.

Molasses Pound Cake. — One cupful of molasses; one cupful of sugar, sifted; one cupful of butter; half a cupful of sweet milk; one cupful of stoned raisins; spices to taste; flour to make a stiff batter.

Bake it in a deep pan.

Kansas Cocoanut Pound Cake. — Bake the cakes in tins as for jelly cake, spread each one thickly with soft icing, strew them with grated cocoanut, and place the cakes in layers, one above another, four in all.

Election Cake. — Two cupfuls of the batter of dough raised with yeast; one cupful of sugar; one cupful of raisins, stoned; half a cupful of butter; one egg; one teaspoonful of cinnamon.

Mix all well together, knead, and bake in a loaf.

Hocus-pocus Pound Cake. — One pound of butter; one pound of sugar, sifted; one pound of flour, sifted; twelve eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately; one teaspoonful of baking-powder; one nutmeg, grated; one wineglassful of rose water; one wineglassf ul of brandy.

Cream the butter and sugar; add the brandy, nutmeg, and rose water; beat in the yolks carefully; then add the beaten whites alternately with one pound of sifted flour; lastly, sprinkle over, and beat well into the batter, a teaspoonful of baking-powder; bake in cake pans.

Ginger Pound Cake. — One teacupful of butter; one teacupful of sugar, sifted; two teacupfuls of molasses; one teacupful of cream with a little soda dissolved in it; flour enough to make a stiff batter; four eggs well beaten; three tablespoonfuls of ginger, one of cinnamon, and one of cloves, all powdered.

Indian Meal Pound Cake. — One pint of fine yellow Indian meal, sifted; half a pint of wheat flour, sifted; half a pound of white sugar, sifted; half a pound of fresh butter; eight eggs, well beaten, whites and yolks separately; one glassful of white wine; one wineglassful of brandy; one nutmeg, grated; one tablespoonful of cinnamon, powdered.

Mix the flour and meal well together; then beat the butter and sugar to cream; add the spices, brandy, and wine; then stir in the eggs and meal alternately; beat hard and long together, put into a buttered tin pan, and bake about two hours; eat fresh.

Savarin Cake. — Two ounces of beer yeast mixed in a little warm milk; six ounces of flour stirred into the yeast and milk; twelve ounces of butter beaten to a cream; the yolks of four eggs beaten into the butter at intervals of five minutes, beating all the time; four entire eggs beaten in the same way; twelve ounces of sifted flour beaten in next, then the yeast and flour mixed; three ounces of lemon juice; one tablespoonful of cream; three teaspoonfuls of milk; two ounces of powdered sugar.

Grease two pans, three inches deep, with butter, and sprinkle them with sugar; put in the batter, and let it rise for about two hours; when light put the pans into a quick oven and bake; when the cakes are done remove them from the pans; stir together, over the fire, a teaspoonful of Maraschino, and one of Marsalla wine, with a teaspoonful of powdered sugar; when the sugar is dissolved, wash the cakes well over with the syrup.

Perfection Sponge Cake. — Fourteen eggs, the yolks of all and the whites of four; one pound of sifted flour; one and a half pounds of white sugar, sif ted; two small, juicy, thin-skinned lemons.

Separate the yolks and whites, putting the yolks into the vessel in which the cake is to be beaten; beat the eggs to the utmost, first separately, then together; meanwhile add to the sugar in the saucepan three wineglassfuls of water, let it dissolve before placing it on a hot fire, and stir it to keep it from burning; when boiling hot, pour it upon the beaten eggs, beating hard all the time, and pouring slowly until it is entirely cold; add the strained juice and grated rind of the lemons; beat a little while longer to make the batter very light; stir in slowly the sifted flour, but do not beat it; then put into two brick-shaped tins well buttered; bake half an hour. An oven hot enough to bake bread with a tender,.soft crust will be hot enough. While the cake is baking, put the four extra whites on a shallow dish, and beat in gradually one pound of pulverized sugar; beat very light, flavor to taste, and, as soon as you take the cake from the oven, ice it; do so thoroughly on the under side of the cake, which should be turned over with a damp knife; score the icing into lines with a damp knife, then set the cake away to cool.

Sponge Cake d la Virginie. — Ten eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately; weight of the eggs in powdered sugar; half their weight in the finest white flour, sifted ; the juice of one lemon; grated rind of one lemon.

Break the yolks into a shallow basin, and the whites into a wide, shallow dish; beat the yolks first, and venj light; when the yolks are beaten to the utmost, beat in half the sugar; then beat the whites to the stiffest possible froth, and beat in the remainder of the sugar; then beat all together hard and long, add the lemon juice and grated peel, and, lastly, beat in the sifted flour in the lightest possible way, as the less the cake is beaten after the flour is added, the lighter it will be; put into buttered pans, and just before putting into the oven sift a little fine sugar over the top; bake in a moderate oven until a straw comes out of the cake, smooth and clean.

Rhode Island Cake. — One cupful of sifted sugar; one cupful of milk; half a cupful of butter; two eggs well beaten, whites and yolks separately; two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar sifted into one quart of flour; another half a cupful of milk with a teaspoonf ul of soda dissolved in it; put the butter in last.

Beat very hard, and bake quickly.

White Mountain Cake. — Half a cupful of butter; two cupfuls of sugar; three and a quarter cupfuls of sifted flour; one cupful of milk; five eggs well beaten with the butter and sugar to a cream; three teaspoonfuls of bakingpowder.

Bake in layers. For the filling take the whites of four eggs, beaten to a froth (stiff), with one pound of fine sugar; flavor with essence of bitter almond; spread each layer of the cake thickly, place one on another, then ice all over again.

Risen Crullers. — Two quarts of flour; six teaspoonfuls of yeast powder; two teacupfuls of sugar; three eggs; six ounces of butter; one pint of rich milk; a little salt.

Warm the butter in the milk; do not beat the eggs before mixing them with the other ingredients; knead the dough well, roll it out in a sheet half an inch thick, cut with a jagging-iron, and throw the cakes into boiling lard; be sure that the lard is absolutely boiling before throwing them in; fry a light brown.

Crullers ("Common-Sense in the Household"). — One pound of butter; one and a half pounds of powdered sugar; twelve eggs, well beaten; mace and nutmeg to taste; flour to roll out stiff.

Roll out into a thin sheet, cut into shapes with a jagging-iron, and fry in plenty of boiling lard; test the heat by dropping in one; it should rise instantly to the surface. These crullers should be a fine yellow. If the fat should become so hot that the crullers brown before puffing out to their full dimensions, take the kettle from the fire for a few minutes. It is best to cut out all the crullers before beginning to fry them. The above receipt is for a large quantity of crullers.

Plainer Crullers. — One and a half teacupf uls of sugar; half a teacupful of sour cream or milk; one third of a teacupful of butter; one egg well beaten; one small teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water; flour to roll out a tolerably stiff paste.

Marvels. — Half a pint of sugar; four eggs well beaten; one quart of flour; half a teaspoon ul of soda.

Rub well, and beat to a cream the eggs, sugar, and soda; then stir in one quart of flour, beating and stirring constantly, and take a separate half-pint of flour to roll the cakes out in; cut in lozenges, and cook in boiling lard like doughnuts. ,

Albany Olicooks. — One pint of lukewarm milk; one teacupful of melted lard; one small cupful of yeast; enough of the finest white flour, sifted, to make a thick batter; three cupfuls of powdered sugar; six eggs, whites only, beaten to the utmost; one teaspoonful of salt.

Stir the melted lard into the lukewarm milk, then enough flour to make a thick batter, and add a small cupful of yeast; beat it well, and set it to rise; when light, work in gradually and carefully three cupf uls of sugar, the whipped whites of six eggs, and the salt; work in gradually enough flour to make it stiff enough to roll out; let it rise again, and when very light roll it out in a sheet an inch thick; out into rounds; put into the centre of each round a large Sultana raisin, seeded, and mould into perfectly round balls; let them stand a few minutes before boiling them; have plenty of lard in the pot, and when it boils drop in the cakes; when they are a light brown, take them out with 'a perforated skimmer; drain on soft white paper,' and roll, while warm, in fine powdered sugar. These are delicious doughnuts.

Risen Doughnuts. — One pound of butter; one and three quarter pounds of sugar; one quart of sweet milk; four eggs; one large cupful of yeast; one tablespoonful of mace or nutmeg, grated; two teaspoonf uls of cinnamon; flour to make all as stiff as bread dough; one teaspoonful of salt.

Cream the butter and sugar; add the milk, yeast, and three pints of flour; set to rise overnight; in the morning beat the eggs very light, and stir into the batter with the spice and the rest of the flour; set to rise three hours, or until light; roll into a pretty thick sheet, form into round balls, and fry in boiling lard; roll, while warm, in powdered sugar.

Quick Doughnuts. — One cupful of butter; two cupf uls of sugar; four eggs, or the whites only of six; one cupful of sour cream; one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water; one teaspoonful of grated nutmeg; half a teaspoonful of cinnamon; flour to roll out in pretty soft dough.

Cut into rounds, form into balls, and fry in hot lard.

Boston Cream Cakes. — Half a pound of butter; three quarters of a pound of flour; eight eggs; one pint of water, warm.

Stir the butter into the warm water; set it on the fire in a saucepan, and slowly bring it to a boil, stirring it often; when it boils, put in the flour, boil one minute, stirring it all the while; take from the fire, turn into a deep dish, and let it cool; beat the eggs very light, and whip into this cooled paste, first the yolks, and then the whites; drop in great spoonfuls upon buttered paper, taking care not to let them touch or run into each other, and bake ten minutes.

Cream for Filling. — One quart of rich, sweet milk; four tablespoonfuls of corn-starch; two eggs, well beaten; two cupfuls of sugar.

Wet the corn-starch with enough milk to work it into a smooth paste; boil the rest of the milk; beat two eggs, add the sugar and corn-starch, and as soon as the milk boils pour in the mixture gradually, stirring all the time until smooth and thick; drop in a teaspoonful of butter, and when this is mixed in set the custard aside to cool; then add the flavoring; split open the puffs, and fill with the mixture.

Almond Cheese Cakes. — Half a pound of almonds blanched, and pounded in a mortar; half a pound of powdered sugar; the yolks of eight eggs well beaten; the grated rind of one lemon.

Beat all together until it becomes light and frothing; fill paste shells with it, and bake in a slow oven.

Philadelphia Lemon Cheese Cakes. — The yolks of eight eggs, beaten very light; three quarters of a pound of sugar; half a pound of butter, well creamed; the juice of three lemons, and the grated peel of two.

Mix all together, fill shells of puff paste, and bake in a slow oven.

Devonshire Curd Cheese Cakes. — Run a gallon of new milk with rennet as for cheese; drain off all the whey from it; put to it half a pound of butter turned to cream; half a pound of raw cream; half a pound of pounded loaf sugar; eight yolks of eggs; salt and nutmeg to taste; half a wineglassful of brandy; three quarters of a pound of currants, well washed and picked; three quarters of a pound of candied orange peel, chopped fine.

Mix all well together, and bake in open shells of puff paste.

Lemon Cheese Cakes. — Two ounces of butter; two eggs; three tablespoonfuls of soft sugar; the grated rinds and juice of two lemons; two stale Savoy biscuits (or ladyfingers), powdered.

Beat all the ingredients well together, and simmer over the fire a few minutes; bake in shells of puff paste. These are old-fashioned cheese cakes, celebrated in English novels.

Yorkshire Curd Cheese Cakes. — Procure some good buttermilk and keep it for a day or two; then put into a pan or basin two quarts of fresh milk; place this in the oven; when it begins to simmer, take it out, and ladle the buttermilk into it by spoonfuls, giving a gentle stir each time; when the cards appear in the milk, and the whey becomes thin, cease adding the buttermilk; next tie the curds in a strainer or piece of canvas, and hang them up for a few hours; to make the cheese cakes, add a cupful of sweet cream to the curds, a cupful of cleaned currants, a cupful of loaf sugar pounded fine, an ounce of mixed peel cut up, and a pinch of salt; mix all these, add a couple of eggs, the whites and yolks beaten separately, and a wineglassful of rum, brandy, or liqueur; put in puff-paste shells and bake in a quick oven. (Very good.)

Vocoanut Cones. — One pound of powdered sugar; half a pound of grated cocoannt; the whites of eight eggs.

Whip the eggs and sugar as for icing until it will stand alone, then beat in the cocoannt; mould the mixture into small cones, and set them at a proper distance (not touching each other), on buttered paper, in a baking-pan; bake in a very moderate oven.

Old-fashioned Cocoanut Cakes. — One cocoannt, carefully skinned and grated; the milk of the cocoanut; one and a half pounds of powdered sugar; the whites of three eggs, well beaten; as much water as cocoanut milk.

Dissolve one pound of the sugar in the milk and water; stew until it becomes a "ropy" syrup, and turn out into a buttered dish; have ready the beaten white of egg, with the remaining half pound of sugar, whipped into it; mix this with the grated cocoanut, and, little by little, beating in all the while the boiled syrup, as soon as it cools sufficiently not to scald the eggs, drop in spoonfuls upon buttered paper; if the batter be too thin, add more sugar; do not let them brown at all.

Sugar Cookies. — One pound of sugar, sifted; one quarter of a pound of butter; three drops of the essence of citron; one egg, well beaten; flour enough to enable you to roll out the cookies.

Cut into small rounds and bake.

Water Cookies. — One cupful of butter; two cupfuls of sifted sugar; two thirds of a cupful of warm water; four cupfuls of sifted flour; one nutmeg, grated; one heaping teaspoonful of soda. Roll out, cut into rounds, and bake.

Rose Cookies. — Six eggs, the whites and yolks beaten separately; one cupful of butter; three cupf uls of sifted sugar; a wineglassful of rose water.

Make into round cakes and bake in a quick oven.

Ginger Crackers, No. 1. — Two quarts of sifted flour; one pint of molasses; one pound of brown sugar; half a pound of lard; two ounces of ground ginger; one teaspoonful of ground cloves.

Knead long and hard, and roll out very thin; cut into small rounds, and bake over a steady, strong fire.

Ginger Crackers, No. 2. — Two quarts of sifted flour; one pint of molasses; one sauoerful of brown sugar; one wineglassf ul of sherry; three tablespoonfuls of lard; one heaping tablespoonful of butter; one teaspoonful of cloves, ground; one teaspoonful of allspice, ground.

Knead long and hard and roll thin; bake as above.

Ginger-nuts. — One quart of molasses; three pints of flour, sifted; one pint of corn meal, sifted; one pound of butter; half a pound of coarse brown sugar; one ounce of allspice, one teaspoonful of cloves, one teaspoonful of cinnamon, and two ounces of ginger, ground.

Put the molasses in an earthen saucepan, add the butter and the sugar, and set on the fire in another and larger saucepan of boiling water; let it stand until the butter and sugar are dissolved; in the meantime mix the spices, all pounded, with the flour and meal; afterwards knead the whole together and cut into rounds the size of a silver half-dollar; bake fifteen minutes, or more if necessary.

Scotch Cakes. — One pound of white sugar, sifted: one pound of eggs; half a pound of fine flour, sifted; half a pound of meal, ditto; three quarters of a pound of butter; one gill of brandy; one nutmeg, grated fine.

Mix well and smoothly, knead hard, and roll out thin; bake on buttered paper in a shallow tin.

Lady Cake. — One pound of sifted sugar; three quarters of a pound of sifted flour; six ounces of butter; the whipped whites of ten eggs.

Flavor with bitter almond, and bake in small square tins; ice with the boiled icing, and flavor the icing with rose water.

Seed Cakes. — Two pounds of sifted white flour; one pound of sifted white powdered sugar; half a pound of caraway seeds; one teaspoonful of lemon juice.

Melt the butter and sugar, work to a smooth paste, then add the lemon juice, then the sifted flour, little by little, then the caraway seeds; roll it out half an inch thick, cut into small squares, crimp the edges, lay on buttered paper, and bake to a pale brown in a quick oven.

Meg Dodd's Cakes (Edinburgh). — One teacupful of sweet milk; one egg beaten light; a piece of butter the size of a walnut; a pinch of salt; enough flour to roll out the cakes.

Cut into lozenges, lay on buttered paper, and bake in a quick oven.

Jennie Dean's Heart Cakes. — One teacupful of sifted sugar; one teacupful of butter; one teaspoonful of rich cream; one teaspoonful of soda; one nutmeg, grated; one egg, beaten light; enough flour to roll out the cakes.

Cut in hearts, and bake.

New-Year's Cakes. — One and a quarter pounds of sugar; one pound of butter; half a pint of cold water; three and a quarter pounds of flour; two eggs, well beaten; one teaspoonfnl of soda dissolved in hot water; four tablespoonf uls of caraway seeds, sprinkled through the flour.

Rub the butter; or, better still, chop up in the flour and dissolve the sugar in the water; mix all well with the beaten eggs, cut in the regular New-year-cake shape, and bake quickly.

Stickeys. — One and a quarter pounds of fine white sugar, sifted; three quarters of a pound of butter; one egg, well beaten; one wineglassful of rose water; one wineglassful of peach water; half a nutmeg, grated.

Mix all well together, form in small rounds, and bake on buttered tins.

Hurry Cakes. — One and a half tablespoonfuls of white sugar; two eggs, well beaten, whites and yolks separately; three and a half cupfuls of flour, sifted; one cupful of sweet milk; half a cupful of sweet cream; one pinch of salt, two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, and one of soda.

Beat the sugar and eggs together first, then add the rest, alternating the milk and flour; bake in well-heated gem-pans; bake twenty minutes in a quick oven.

Macaroons. — Soak half a pound of sweet almonds in boiling water until the skin will come off easily, then wipe them dry, and pound them fine with rose water; beat the whites of three eggs to the stiffest froth, stir in gradually half a pound of powdered white sugar, and then add the almonds; when these are all mixed in, drop the mixture in small heaps on buttered baking-plates, half an inch apart, sift sugar over them, and bake them in a slow oven.

Cocoanut Drops. — One pound of grated cocoanut; three quarters of a pound of light-brown sugar.

Put the sugar on the fire in a kettle, with about a tablespoonful of water in, just enough to prevent it from burning; stir it constantly, and when the sugar is melted and forms a smooth mass, remove it from the fire, add the coconut, and mix it well with the sugar, and then stir thoroughly through the whole the whites of three eggs, beaten light, to bind it all together; mould the cakes with the hand, using a tablespoonful of the mixture for each one; form them in round balls, and bake on buttered tins.

Shellbark Macaroons. — One cupful of kernels, blanched and chopped fine; one cupful of sugar; one egg, well beaten; one tablespoonful of flour.

Beat well together, drop in little heaps the size of a large nutmeg, on buttered papers in pans; bake a delicate brown.

Passover Prealaters. — Twelve eggs, well beaten, whites and yolks separately; weight of the eggs in fine sifted sugar; half the weight in fine sifted flour; grated rind of a lemon, and all the juice.

Mix as for sponge cake, beat very light, bake in small buttered tins, and ice.

Blueberry Short Cake. — One cupful of sifted sugar; one cupful of sweet milk; two eggs, well beaten, whites and yolks separately; two tablespoonf uls of melted butter; one and a half pints of sifted flour; two heaped teaspoonfuls of baking-powder,sifted into the flour; one cupful of blueberries well flavored.

Beat all well together, and bake in a quick oven. Eat hot.

Lafayette Ginger Balls. — Half a pound of butter; half a pound of sugar, sifted; one pint of molasses; six eggs, well beaten, whites and yolks separately; one coffecupful of sour cream; two teaspoonfuls each of powdered cloves and cinnamon; two and a half teaspoonfuls of ginger; one heaped teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water; rind and juice of an orange and a lemon; one and a half pounds of sifted flour.

Cream the butter and sugar, warm the molasses slightly, and beat them together; then the beaten yolks, next the milk and spice, the soda, flour, and whites, well whipped; beat well before baking. Put into small, round tin moulds (queen-cake shape) and bake.

Ginger Wafer Snaps. — One pound of butter; three pounds of flour, sifted; three quarters of a pound of sugar, sifted; two ounces of powdered ginger; eight dozen of powdered cloves; ten dozen of powdered allspice; half an ounce of cinnamon, powdered; one quart of molasses.

Mix smoothly and well, knead it in small quantities, and then knead it all together. If the dough is too thin to roll out properly, add enough sifted flour to enable you to do so; roll out thin, cut into small cakes, and bake on buttered tins.

Ginger Snaps, Virginia. — One cupful of butter and one cupful of lard melted together; one cupful of brown sugar; two cupfuls of molasses; half 'a cupful of milk; two tablespoonf uls of ginger; two teaspoonf uls of saleratus, dissolved in hot water.

Mix with the melted lard and butter, the sugar, molasses, milk, ginger, and saleratus; add just enough sifted flour to enable you to roll it out very thin. Cut in small rounds, and bake in buttered tins, in a slow oven.

Old Humphrey's Ginger Snaps. — One cupful of butter; two cupfuls of molasses; two tablespoonf uls of ginger; two teaspoonf uls of soda; enough sifted flour to roll out.

Roll out very thin, cut into rounds with a claret glass, lay on buttered paper, and bake in a quick oven.

Old Humphrey's Orange Ginger Snaps. — One pint of molasses; one pound of sugar; three quarters of a pound of butter; one ounce of ginger, ground; one ounce of candied orange peel snipped fine; one teaspoonf ul of soda; enough sifted flour to make stiff.

Cut into small rounds, and bake as above. If properly made and baked, these are delicious snaps.

Mary Anne's Cookies. — One cupful of butter; one cupful of sugar; one cupful of sour milk or cream; one nutmeg, grated; one teaspoonful of saleratus; enough flour to enable you to roll out the cookies.

Cut into rounds and bake.

Almond Wafers. — A quarter of a pound of almonds, blanched, and pounded to a paste with rose water; half a pound of sugar; whites of six eggs well beaten; two ounces of flour.

Beat to a thin batter, bake in wafer-irons, and roll while warm.

Wafers, No. 1. — Nine spoonfuls of powdered sugar; nine spoonfuls of sifted flour; two eggs beaten up with milk.

Make a batter as for pancakes, and bake in wafer-irons. The irons should be often greased while new, afterwards one greasing will suffice.

Wafers, No. 2. — Six eggs; one pint of flour; two ounces of melted butter; one and a half cupfuls of powdered sugar; one cupful of milk; one teaspoonful of nutmeg.

Beat the whites and yolks separately, and very stiff; rub the sugar and butter together, and work in first the yolks, then the milk, then the flour and whites; bake very quickly in well-buttered wafer-irons, and roll while small upon an iron wafer-stick.

Mary Anne's Wafers. — One cupful of butter; two cupfuls of sugar; three eggs well beaten; a quarter of a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in boiling water; one teaspoonful of nutmeg; half a teaspoonful of cloves; flour enough to make a soft dough.

Work in gradually enough flour to roll out very thin; cut in rounds with a tumbler, and bake quickly.

Schnee Wandeln (Fran von P. zu P.). — Four ounces of butter; five ounces of sifted sugar; three ounces of sifted flour of the finest quality; whites of five eggs beaten to the utmost.

Beat sugar and butter to a cream; then add, little by little, the sifted flour, stirring all the time; then the beaten whites, still stirring; when all the ingredients are well mixed together, beat hard and long until the whole mass is as light as snow; have ready some small tin forms, shaped thus: \_J They must be buttered and dusted lightly with crystallized sugar; fill these with the snow batter, and bake in a quick oven; turn them out of the forms before serving. If you wish to fill the schnee wandeln, you should half fill the forms with the batter; then put in a spoonful o?some tart preserve, and fill up the form again with the batter. This is a famous Bavarian dainty, always made about Christmas time.

Philadelphia Jumbles. — One pound of sugar; half a pound of butter; eight eggs, beaten light; essence of bitter almond or rose to taste; enough flour to enable you to roll them out.

Stir the sugar and butter to a light cream, then add the well-whipped eggs, the flavoring, and flour; mix well together, roll out in powdered sugar, roll in a sheet a quarter of an inch thick, cut into rings with a jagging-iron, and bake in a quick oven on buttered tins.

Cream Jumbles. — One cupful of sugar; one cupful of butter; half a cupful of sour cream; one egg well beaten; one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water; nutmeg to taste. Mix and bake as above.

Lemon Jumbles. — One egg; one teacupful of sugar; half a teacupf ul of butter; three teaspoon! uls of milk; one teaspoonful of cream of tartar; half a teaspoonful of soda; two small lemons, the juice of both, and grated rind of one.

Mix rather stiff, roll out, cut, and bake as usual.

Almond Jumbles. — One pound of sugar; half a pound of flour; quarter of a pound of butter; one teacupf ul of loppered milk; five eggs, well beaten; two tablespoonfuls of rose water; three quarters of a pound of almonds, blanched and chopped very fine; one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in boiling water.

Cream butter and sugar; stir in the beaten yolks, the milk, flour, rose water, almonds, and, lastly, the beaten whites very lightly and quickly; drop in rings on buttered paper, and bake at once.

Boiled Icing. — One and a half pounds of the finest sifted white sugar; one pint of water.

Mix and boil until it ropes; have ready the whites of seven eggs beaten to a stiff froth; pour the syrup into a bowl, and stir until milkwarm; then add the eggs, and beat hard for an hour.

Quick Icing. — For the white of every egg use at least one quarter of a pound of sifted sugar; break the whites into a broad, shallow dish; throw a little sugar on them, and begin beating smoothly and steadily; proceed in this way until the icing is formed ; pour the icing by the spoonful on the top of the cake, and let it settle itself if possible; if not, use a broad-bladed knife to spread it, dipped in cold water; if in haste, set the cake in the oven to dry for three minutes.

Chocolate Icing. — Quarter of a cake of chocolate, grated; half a cupful of sweet milk; one tablespoonful of corn-starch; one teaspoonf ul of vanilla extract; powdered sugar to taste.

Mix smoothly, boil two minutes after it has fairly come to a boil, flavor, and sweeten with powdered sugar. It must be very sweet. �

Almond Icing. — One pound of sweet almonds, blanched, pounded to a paste in a Wedgewood mortar, and moistened with rose water; one pound of powdered sugar; the whites of four eggs whipped stiff.

Prepare the icing as usual; then beat in the almond paste; put on half an inch thick, and when dry cover with plain icing.

Sweet-Potato Pone. — One quart of grated raw sweet potato; one teacupful of powdered sugar; one teacupful of butter; one teacupful of molasses; two teacupfuls of warm water; one tablespoonful of powdered ginger.

Mix all well together, and bake in a buttered pan two or three inches deep; eat hot.

Soft Gingerbread, No. 1. — One cupful of molasses; one cupful of butter; one cupful of sugar; one cupful of sour cream; one tablespoonful of powdered ginger; three eggs, well beaten; one tablespoonful of soda dissolved in hot water; ground spice to taste; flour enough to make a stiff batter.

Mix the butter and sugar together to a cream, and then add the other ingredients; beat the eggs last, whites and yolks together; bake in a buttered baking-pan in a very slow oven.

Soft Gingerbread, No. 2. — One cupful of butter; one cupful of molasses; one cupful of sugar; one cupful of sour milk or buttermilk; one teaspoonf ul of soda dissolved in boiling water; one tablespoonful of ginger; one teaspoonful of cinnamon; two eggs, well beaten; enough sifted flour to make the batter as thick as cup-cake batter.

Stir the butter, sugar, molasses, and spices together to a light cream, and set them on the range until slightly warm; beat the eggs light; add the milk to the warm mixture, then the eggs, soda, and, lastly, the flour; beat very hard ten minutes, and bake at once in a loaf.

Sponge Gingerbread. — Five cupfuls of sifted flour; one cupful of molasses; one cupful of sugar; one cupful of sour cream; one heaping tablespoonful of butter; two teaspoonfuls of saleratus dissolved in hot water; two teaspoonfuls of powdered ginger; two teaspoonfuls of powdered cinnamon.

Mix the molasses, sugar, butter, and spices together, warm them slightly, and beat until they are very light; add the sour milk, then the saleratus and the flour gradually; then half a pound of the finest Sultana raisins, seeded and chopped; beat very hard five minutes, and bake in a broad, shallow pan well buttered.

Fruit Gingerbread. — Two pounds of the finest white flour, sifted; three quarters of a pound of butter; one pound of brown sugar; one pound of currants, picked, washed, and dredged; one pound of Sultana raisins, seeded, chopped, and dredged; a quarter of a pound of candied orange peel, shredded very fine, and dredged; two cupfulls of molasses; half a cupful of sour cream; six eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately; one heaping teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water; two tablespoonfuls of ginger, powdered; one teaspoonful of cinnamon, powdered; one teaspoonful of cloves, powdered.

Cream the butter and sugar, warm the molasses slightly, and beat these together; then the beaten yolks, next the milk and spice, the soda, flour, and whites well whipped; lastly, the fruit; beat well before baking; put into two broad pans well buttered, and bake in a moderate oven.

Spiced Gingerbread, No. 1 (Mary Anne's). — One cupful of butter; one cupful of molasses; one cupful of brown sugar; half a cup ul of cold water; one tablespoonf ul of ginger; one teaspoonful of cinnamon; a pinch of salt; a pinch of grated nutmeg; one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in boiling water; flour to make a stiff batter.

Melt the butter, warm slightly the molasses, spices, and sugar, and beat together ten minutes; then put in the water, soda, and flour; stir very hard, and bake in three small loaves; brush over with syrup while hot, and eat hot.

Spiced Gingerbread, No. 2. — One pound of flour; one pound of sugar; half a pound of butter; five eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately; three tablespoonfuls of sweet milk; half a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water; one teaspoonful of cream of tartar; one large tablespoonful of powdered ginger; one teaspoonful of powdered cloves; one teaspoonful of powdered nutmeg; one teaspoonful of powdered cinnamon.

Cream the sugar and butter, stir in the beaten yolks, the milk and spice, the soda, and when all is well mixed put in the flour, stirring all the time; bake in buttered pans.

Spiced Gingerbread, No. 3. — One cupful of butter; two cups uls of molasses; two eggs very well beaten; one tablespoonful of ginger; one tablespoonful of cloves, cinnamon, and nutmeg, mixed; one teaspoonful of saleratus, heaped; one cupful of sour milk; flour enough to make a batter of the consistency of pound cake.

Plain Gingerbread. — Two cupfuls of molasses; half a cupful of lard; half a cupful of butter; one cupful of Bonr milk; two tablespoonfuls of powdered ginger; two teaspoonfuls of soda dissolved in hot water; flour enough to make a soft dough.

Warm the molasses, lard, butter, and ginger, and beat them ten minutes before adding the milk, soda, and flour; roll out, cut into shapes, and bake in a quick, but not very hot oven; brush over with white of egg while hot.

Composition Cake. — Two pounds of sifted flour; one and a quarter pounds of butter; one and a quarter pounds of sugar, sifted; two and a quarter pounds of currants, picked, washed, and dredged; twelve eggs, the whites and yolks beaten separately to the utmost; one gill of cognac; one tumblerful of molasses; half a teaspoonful of soda.

Bake in round tins.

Magdalen Cake (known in Bavaria and Saxony as Magdalenen Brod). — Half a pound of small raisins, stoned; half a pound of butter; three quarters of a pound of sugar, sifted; one pound of the finest white flour, sifted; the yolks of seven eggs, beaten to the utmost; the whites of five eggs, beaten to the utmost.

Cream the butter and sugar; then add the yolks and flour, stirring steadily all the time; then the highly beaten whites of five eggs; and, lastly, the stoned raisins; butter a large, shallow tin plate, and spread the batter on it about an inch thick; dot with small chocolate comfits and bake.

Angel Cake. — One cupful of flour (the finest white), sifted; one teaspoonful of cream of tartar; one and a half cupfuls of the finest granulated sugar; one teaspoonful of vanilla or almond; the whites only of eleven eggs, beaten to the utmost.

Sift the flour once, and measure a cupful; then mix thoroughly with the cream of tartar and sift four times; beat the whites with a perforated spoon or wire beater to their utmost capacity; add the sugar and beat again; or, rather, when the whites are light and flaky, beat in the sugar, and then beat again; add the flavoring, and then mix in the flour lightly and quickly; have ready a cake pan lined with white paper (not greased), pour in the mixture and bake forty minutes; when done, loosen round the edge and turn out at once. Some persons have been more successful with this cake by mixing the sugar with the flour and cream of tartar, and adding all at once the beaten egg.

Sunshine Cake. — Make just as you make angel cake, using one teaspoonful of orange extract instead of vanilla, and adding the well-beaten yolks of six eggs to the beaten whites and sugar before adding the flour.

Watermelon Cake (" Boston Cook-book"). — Half a cupful of butter; one and a half cups uls of fine granulated sugar, colored red; the yolks of four eggs well beaten; one whole egg well beaten; half a cupful of milk; half a teaspoonful of mace; a quarter of a teaspoonful of soda; three quarters of a teaspoonful of cream of tartar; two and a half cupf uls of flour, sifted; one cupful of raisins, seeded, quartered, and rolled in flour.

Mix in the order given, putting the soda and cream of tartar into the flour, and milk and flour alternately; bake in a moderate oven until the loaf shrinks from the pan.

Raisin Cream Cake (" Boston Cook-book "). — One scant cupful of butter; one and a half cupfuls of sugar, sifted; three eggs, the whites and yolks beaten separately and well; one teaspoonful of flavoring; one saltspoonful of mace; half a cupful of milk; three cupfuls of pastry flour; one teaspoonf ul of cream of tartar; half a teaspoonful of soda.

Cream the butter, add the sugar gradually, then the yolks of the eggs, and then the flavoring; reserve a quarter of a cupful of flour lest the cake be too stiff, remembeting that less flour is needed for a thin than for a thick loaf; put the soda and cream of tartar into the remainder of the flour; add the milk and flour alternately, a little at a time, and, lastly, the whites, which have been beaten stiff and dry; bake in shallow, round pans in a moderate oven; split, and spread with a thin layer of currant jelly, and fill with a cream made as follows:

One cupful of raisins, stoned and chopped fine; half a cupful of grated almonds; half a cupful of grated cocoanut; the white of one egg beaten stiff.

Gateau Malakoff. — One and a half pounds of finest white flour, sifted and warmed; half an ounce of yeast dissolved in half a pint of tepid milk. Mix well, and add to the flour from one and a half to two ounces of fresh butter; add also salt to taste, a little aniseed, and a pinch of sugar, or two lumps of loaf sugar; beat long and well, and then pour into a malakoff, or round buttered mould shaped like a tower, and put it in a warm place to rise for three or four hours. When it has risen to the level of the mould put it into a hot oven, and bake half an hour, or until it is a light brown, and falls easily out of the mould. Eat cold. This is a delicious tea-cake, cut in slices and buttered.

PASTRY.

GENERAL DIRECTIONS.

1. Use none but the best materials. The finest white flour, sifted through a hair sieve, in every stage of the process of paste-making. The best fresh butter; or the best salt butter, washed carefully through several clear, cold waters, and kneaded under water to extract the salt. The butter should be hard and cool. The best lard, firm and sweet. The freshest of eggs.

2. Handle all paste as little as possible.

3. Make it in a cool place.

i. Let your moulding-board be a marble slab, or a board of hard wood, clean, smooth, and kept for this purpose alone.

The oven ought to be ready when the paste is begun. The heat should be perfectly steady and even; i. e., as great at the bottom as at the top.

Puff paste requires a quick oven. Paste less rich and filled with fruit requires a moderate oven. In all pies in which it is necessary to thicken the juice, a teaspoonful of corn-starch will be found a great improvement. When the lower crust is filled, strew the corn-starch evenly over it, wet the edge of the lower crust with a very little water, and when the top crust is put on, pinch the edges together.

All dried fruits for pies should be soaked in cold water a night before using them. Paste should be baked as soon as made.

Plain Pie Crust. — One quart of the finest white flour, sifted; half a pound of butter; half a pound of lard, sweet, firm, and of the best quality; one small teacupful of ice-water.

Sift the flour into a deep wooden bowl, using for the purpose a fine hair sieve; then chop up the lard into the flour until it is as fine as dust; add enough ice-water to enable you to work all into a stiff dough, and work with a wooden spoon until it is necessary for you to use your hands; then flour them, and knead the paste into a round ball with as few strokes as possible; lay this ball on the floured moulding-board, and roll it out into a thin sheet; always roll one way — from you — and with a light, steady stroke; when thin enough, stick little bits of butter, with a knife, evenly and closely all over the sheet; roll up the paste then into a compact roll, flatten with your rollingpin, and roll out again as thin as before; repeat this, basting with butter, and flouring lightly each time until the butter is used up and the paste smooth and even; then roll up and lay in a very cold place for fifteen minutes; in hot weather it may safely be left on the ice for an hour; then roll out several times, and cut into the shape you require; lay the paste on buttered pie-plates, fit it neatly, cut off the edges, put in the fruit, put on the paste lid, and press down the edges firmly to prevent the escape of the juice; or put a paste lattice-work over the fruit; put all the scraps of paste together, and roll out into another sheet. Bake pastry in a moderate oven to a light brown.

Jet Paste (Cuisiniere Bourgeoise). — One quart of the finest white flour passed through a hair sieve; a pinch of salt; yolks of two eggs; a piece of fresh butter the size of a chestnut; a glass of cold water.

Put the sifted flour on your moulding-board, make a hole in the middle of the heap, and pour in the yolks, well beaten, a pinch of salt, a small piece of butter, and enough water to enable you to work the whole together; do this quickly, handling it as little as possible; form it into a ball, cover it with a clean cloth, and leave it for twenty minutes; then dust the moulding-board with flour, and roll out the paste; it should be longer than it is wide; then drain, and roll out into one sheet (between two floured linen cloths) eighteen and a half ounces of the finest fresh butter; place this on one half of the sheet of paste, and fold the paste over it, so as to sandwich the butter; the paste and the butter should be of precisely the same consistency, so that they may be handled, rolled, and moulded smoothly; roll the paste and butter very carefully, smoothly, and thinly; then fold again in three, then roll up into a roll, and roll out again into a thin sheet; repeat this — at intervals of a quarter of an hour — six times in summer and seven in winter, dusting both mouldingboard and paste lightly each time with sifted flour; it will then be ready, and at the expiration of five minutes may be baked; the oven should be ready beforehand, as this leaf paste is easily spoiled by waiting. This is really the nicest paste for pies and tarts.

Galette Italienne. — Make as above, roll out very thin, cut into rounds with a tumbler, prick all over with a fork, brush lightly with beaten white of egg, lay on buttered paper, and bake in a quick oven.

Remove from the paper, salt lightly, and serve cold. Delicious with tea.

Transparent Leaf Paste. — One pound of finest white flour, sifted through a hair sieve; one pound of fresh butter; yolk of one egg,whipped very light.

Melt the butter in a pot set within a vessel, set in another of boiling water, and stir the butter gently all the time; then skim, and when almost cold beat up the butter a little with the whipped egg; when these are thoroughly mixed, work the flour, roll out twice, dusting lightly each time with flour before you fold it, then let it stand five minutes folded in a cold place, and roll out for tartlets, pates, or galette. Bake at once.

French Puff Paste. — One pound of finest white flour, sifted through a hair sieve; three quarters of a pound of fresh butter; yolk of one egg, well beaten; ice-water enough to enable you to roll out the paste.

Chop half the butter into the flour; stir the beaten egg into half a cupful of ice-water, and work the flour into a stiff dough; roll out thin, baste with one third the remaining butter, fold closely, roll out again, and so on, until the butter is used up; roll out very thin, and set the last roll in a very cold place ten or fifteen minutes before using the crust. Wash with beaten egg while hot.

Plain Raised Pie Crust. — One pound of flour; three quarters of a pound of butter; one teaspoonful of soda; two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar; ice-water to make a stiff dough.

Sift the flour through a hair sieve, then sift the soda and cream of tartar into the flour, then pass the flour so mixed three times through a hair sieve; then chop the butter through the flour very evenly and freely; then work with ice-water to a stiff dough, roll into a thin sheet, baste with one third the remaining butter, fold up closely into a long roll, flatten, and reroll; then beat again; do this three times, until the butter is gone. Then roll out the crust.

Puff Paste. — One pound of finest white flour, sifted through a hair sieve; one pound of fresh butter; a quarter of a pound of finest white flour, sifted as above, and kept apart to dust with.

Rub one of the quarters of butter into the pound of flour, and mix it with as much cold water as will moisten the paste, and make it easy to work; roll this dough out on the paste-board three times, each time adding to the rolled-out sheet a quarter of the pound of butter, dotting it over in spots, and then dusting it with the sieve from the reserved flour; when this is done, set the lump of dough on one side of the board, cut off from it enough for one pie, roll this out very thin, and dust it with flour; then fold it up and roll it out again, and then roll it the proper thickness for your crust; the rolling-up and dusting is to make it flaky. Handle all paste as little as possible.

Plain Apple Pie. — Pare, core, and slice ripe, tart winter apples; line a deep dish with fine puff paste; put in a layer of fruit, sprinkle white or light-brown sugar on it, scatter half a dozen cloves upon this, put in another layer of apples, and so on until the dish is well filled; cover with crust, and bake.

Rich Apple Pie. — One dozen of fine, ripe, tart apples, peeled, cored, and grated; one pound of white sugar; half a pound of butter; six eggs, whites and yolks separately; one lemon, juice and grated peel; a pinch of nutmeg.

Cream the butter and sugar, stir in the beaten yolks, then the lemon, nutmeg, and apple, lastly the beaten whites; bake in open shell of puff paste, with crossbars of the same on the top.

Green Apple Pie. — Pare, core, and slice green apples, and stew until very soft, with a little grated lemon and juice; sweeten to taste, press through a sieve, stir in a very little nutmeg, and a tablespoonful of butter for each pie; bake in open shells of puff paste, with crossbars of the same over the top.

Apple Meringue Pie. — Pare, core, slice, and stew ripe, juicy apples; stew them with a little lemon peel, enough to flavor them nicely; add sugar to taste, and a pinch of grated nutmeg; strain through a sieve, and when cold fill open crusts of paste,and bake; then cover each pie with a thick meringue, made by whipping up the whites of three eggs for each pie, allowing a tablespoonful of sugar for each egg; flour to taste. The meringue should be very stiff; place in the oven until the meringue is well set. Eat cold.

Thanksgiving Apple Pie. — Six apples, peeled, cored, stewed, and strained; six ounces of loaf sugar ; six ounces of butter; six eggs beaten light, whites and yolks separately; the juice of two lemons, and the peel of one; one wineglassful of rose water.

Cream the butter and sugar, stir in the beaten yolks, then the lemon, rose water, and stewed apples; lastly, beat in the whites very lightly; then fill your paste, and bake.

Apple Custard Pie. — Three cupfuls of stewed apple; nearly one cupful of white sugar; six eggs beaten light; one quart of rich milk.

Stew the apple and let it cool; beat the eggs light, and mix the yolks well with the apple, seasoning it with nutmeg only; then stir in gradually the milk, beating as you go on; lastly, add the whites; bake in crust with a latticework of paste on the top.

Madison Apple Pie. — Line a deep pie-dish with rich puff paste; slice the apples, previously pared and cored, into the pie-dish, heaping it quite full; bake it until the apples are done, and the pie brown ; then take off the upper crust, lay it upside down on a napkin, and season the pie by stirring into it cream and sugar flavored with rose, cinnamon, or allspice, according to taste; replace the cover, and serve hot.

Pineapple Pie. — One large pineapple, pared and grated; half a pound of fresh butter; half a pound of sugar; one wineglassful of brandy; one tablespoonful of rose water; a little nutmeg, grated.

Mix all together with the juice and pulp of the pineapple, adding a little grated bread; bake ten minutes in a crust.

Apple Mincemeat. — Two pounds of tart apples, pared, cored, and chopped; three quarters of ft pound of beef suet, cleared from strings and powdered; one pound of currants, well picked, washed, and dredged; half a pound of raisins, seeded and chopped; half a pound of Sultana raisins, seeded and chopped; a quarter of a pound of citron, shredded fine; the juice and grated rind of one large lemon; two pounds of brown sugar; half a pint of the best white brandy; one glassful of sherry or Madeira; one teaspoonful of powdered cloves; one teaspoonful of powdered mace; one tablespoonful of powdered cinnamon; one tablespoonful of powdered allspice; two teaspoonfuls of fine salt.

Pack down in a stone jar with a close cover, and keep in a cold place.

Pan Dowdy. — Line the sides of a deep baking-pan with common pie crust; fill it with apples, pared, cored, and quartered, and add two cupfuls of sugar, a teaspoonful of powdered cinnamon, a cupful of cider, and a little water; cover it with rather a thick crust; bake it slowly four hours; then break in the crust, and mix it well with the apples; eat with cream.

Imitation Apple Pie. — One cupful of bread crumbs; one cupful of sugar; one cupful of hot water; enough tartaric acid or lemon juice to make it a little sour.

Orange Cream Pie. — Peel of one orange boiled in a pint of water; half a pound of loaf sugar boiled with the orange peel; the juice of three oranges, well strained and added to the above; the yolks of five eggs beaten very light.

When yon have added the orange juice to the boiled peel and sugar, take out the peel and set the syrup aside to cool; when cold stir in the beaten eggs, and put the bowl containing the whole into a kettle of boiling water on the fire; stir all the time and until it begins to be very thick; then take from the fire, pour into open shells of puff paste, and bake. This is a delicious pie.

Lemon Cream Pie. — One teacupf ul of powdered sugar; one tablespoonful of fresh butter; one egg; the juice and grated rind of one lemon; one teacupful of boiling water; one tablespoonful of corn-starch dissolved in cold water.

Stir the cornstarch into the water, cream the butter and sugar, and pour over them the hot mixture; when quite cold add the juice and grated rind of the lemon, and the beaten egg; bake in open shells.

Custard Pie. — Four eggs well beaten; one quart of milk; four tablespoonfuls of white sugar; flavoring to taste.

Beat the yolks and sugar light, and mix with the milk; flavor, whip in the beaten whites, mix well, and pour into shells; bake as cup custard or custard pudding.

Cream Pie. — Two pints of milk; one pint of cream; six eggs; six tablespoons uls of white sugar; two tablespoonfuls of corn-starch; flavoring to taste.

Boil the cream and milk as usual in a farina kettle, stir in the corn-starch wet in cold water, and boil one minute; when nearly cold stir in the sugar, the yolks of all the eggs, and the whipped whites of two, also the flavoring; when the cream is smooth pour into puff-paste shells, and bake; whip the remaining whites with powdered sugar to the stiffest possible froth; flavor differently from the cream; then draw the pics to the edge of the oven, put on the meringue quickly, and replace in the oven to set; do this rapidly; eat cold.

Chocolate Cream Pie, No. 1. — One quart of milk or sweet cream; quarter of a cake of the finest vanilla chocolate, grated; six eggs, yolks of all, and whites of three; one pint of boiling water; half a cupful of white sugar; two coffeespoonfuls of vanilla.

Dissolve the chocolate in a very little milk, stir into the boiling water, and boil three minutes; when nearly cold beat up with this the yolks of all the eggs and the whites of three; stir this mixture into the milk, flavor, and pour into shells of puff paste; whip the remaining whites into a stiff froth with powdered sugar, and when the cream is set spread this meringue over it, and place for a moment in the oven.

Chocolate Cream Pie, No. 2. — Half a cake of the finest vanilla chocolate, grated; four eggs, yolks and whites well beaten; one tablespoonful of cornstarch dissolved in cold water; three tablespoonfuls of rich milk; four tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar; one teaspoonful of vanilla; half a teaspoonful of bitter almonds, roasted and ground to powder; one teaspoonful of fresh butter, melted.

Grate the chocolate to a fine powder, rub it smooth in the milk, heat to boiling over the fire, and stir in the cornstarch wet with cold water; stir five minutes until well thickened, stirring in, also, the melted butter; remove from the fire, and pour into a bowl; beat all the yolks and the whites of two eggs well with the sugar, and whip into the chocolate mixture; when it is almost cold add, also, the flavoring, and beat all together until light and smooth ; bake in open shells of pastry; beat up the whites of two eggs with two tablespoonfuls of sugar to a stiff meringue, flavor very delicately with bitter almond, and spread over the pies.

Cocoanut Cream Pie. — One pound of cocoanut, grated; half a pound of powdered sugar; one quart of half milk, half cream; one teaspoonful of bitter almonds, roasted and ground; two teaspoonf uls of rose water.

Boil the milk and cream in a farina kettle; take it from the fire; whip in gradually the beaten eggs; when cool, but not cold, season, whip in the cocoanut, and pour into paste shells; bake twenty minutes.

Cocoanut Pie, No. 1. — Half a pound of grated cocoanut; half a pound of fresh butter; half a pound of powdered sugar; one wineglassful of brandy; four eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately to the utmost; two teaspoonfuls of lemon juice; two teaspoonfuls of flavoring to taste.

Rub the butter and sugar to a smooth cream; whip in the brandy and lemon juice; stir in the beaten yolks; lastly, the cocoanut alternately with the whites; bake in open shells of the finest puff paste.

Cocoanut Pie, No. 2. — Half a pound of grated cocoanut; three quarters of a pound of white sugar, powdered; six ounces of butter; five eggs, whites only; two tablespoons fuls of rose water; one teaspoonful of nutmeg, grated; one wineglassful of pale sherry.

Cream the butter and sugar; when well mixed beat very light with the wine and rose water; whip in the cocoanut as lightly as possible, finally the stiffened whites of eggs; bake in open shells of the lightest possible puff paste.

Bakewell Pie. — Four ounces of melted butter; four ounces of powdered sugar; the yolks of six eggs beaten light; whites of four beaten to the utmost degree of stiffness; one tablespoonful of ratifia.

Beat all well together, and bake in open shells of puff paste which have previous^ been spread an inch thick with preserve; pour the Bakewell over the preserve, and bake at once. (Delicious.)

Fruit Pie (as made in Austria). — Take a large, shallow pie-dish — the larger the better; cover it with plain family pie crust; cut with your jagging-iron some long, thin strips of paste, and with them make a sparse latticework over the plate; do this before putting in the fruit; then fill the interstices with fresh fruit; dust lightly with sugar, and bake; then dust with sugar again; serve cold. This is a delicious pie. Large tart plums, stoned and cut in half, are excellent for this pie; so are apricots, stoned and halved; but any fruit is adapted for it.

Lemon Pie, No. 1. — Grated rind of a lemon and all the juice; the yolks of four eggs, well beaten; one cupful of sugar, sifted; one cupful of cream; one tablespoonful of flour, sifted.

Beat the yolks first; then add the sugar, cream, flour, rind, and juice in order; beat long and well, and bake in an open crust; while baking beat the whites stiff with four tablespoonfuls of sifted white sugar; when the pie is baked, spread the whites on lightly and set in the oven to brown. The above quantity is enough for two small pies. Eat cold.

Lemon, Pie, No. 2. — Half a pound of butter; one pound of sugar; six eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately; the juice of one lemon; grated rind of two; one nutmeg, grated; half a glassful of brandy.

Cream the butter and sugar; beat in the yolks, lemon, spice, and brandy, the yolks last of all; bake in open crusts of pie paste; eat cold.

Mince-meat, (Philadelphia). — One pound of fresh beef, freed from fat and fibre, and chopped fine; two pounds of suet, freed from strings, and powdered; one and a quarter pounds of currants, carefully washed, dried, and picked over; one and a quarter pounds, also, of Sultana raisins, seeded and chopped; three quarters of a pound of sugar; quarter of an ounce of powdered cloves; quarter of an ounce of powdered mace; one nutmeg, grated; quarter of a pint of the finest rose water; quarter of a pint of old Madeira or pale sherry; the rind of two lemons, grated; quarter of a pound of candied orange peel, shredded fine; two teaspoonfuls of salt. Moisten the whole with cider.

Mince-meat (Beeton). — Three pounds of suet, shredded and chopped fine; four pounds of Sultana raisins, seeded and chopped; four pounds of currants, carefully washed, dried, and picked over; fifty pippin apples, peeled, cored, and chopped fine; one fresh neat's tongue, boiled and chopped fine; half an ounce of powdered cloves; half an ounce of powdered mace; half an ounce of powdered nutmeg; one and a half pounds of sugar; one pint of the finest brandy; one pint of the finest white wine; the juice of one orange and of one lemon; quarter of a pound of citron,

Stir all together, and put it away in a stone pot; when the pies are made, stir up the whole of the mince-meat, take from it as much as you will require for the baking, taste it, and if not flavored enough add a little wine and the juice of an orange.

Mock Mince-meat. — (" Common - Sense in the Household"). — Six soda crackers, rolled fine; two cupfuls of cold water; one cupful of molasses; one cupful of brown sugar; one cupful of sour cider; one and a half cupfuls of melted butter; one cupful of raisins, seeded and chopped; one cupful of currants; two eggs beaten light; one tablespoonful of cinnamon and allspice, mixed; one teaspoonful of nutmeg; one teaspoonful of cloves; one teaspoonful of salt; one teaspoonful of black pepper; one wineglassful of brandy.

Mince Pie. — Three quarters of a pound of tenderloin of beef and three quarters of a pound of beefsteak, both chopped very fine; one and a half pounds of suet chopped to a powder; three pounds of chopped apples; two pounds of currants, picked and washed; two pounds of Sultana raisins, seeded; one and a half pounds of brown sugar; half a cupful of vinegar; one pint of brandy; two glassfuls of Madeira or sherry; one teaspoonful of mace; one teaspoonful of cinnamon; one teaspoonful of cloves; one teaspoonful of salt.

Edinburgh Mince Pie. — Two pounds of beef chopped fine; two pounds of beef suet, freed from strings and chopped to powder; four and a half pounds of chopped apples; one pound of currants, picked and dredged; two and a half pounds of raisins, seeded; one and a quarter pounds of brown sugar; three pints of cider; one pint of molasses; half a cupful of vinegar; one quart of the best brandy; three glassfuls of sherry wine; one tablespoonful of fine salt; one and a half tablespoonfuls each of cloves, mace, and cinnamon.

Missionary Pie. — One pound of sugar, powdered; three quarters of a pound of fresh butter creamed with the sugar; one grated cocoanut; ten eggs, the whites and yolks beaten separately; one quart of milk; three slices of stale baker's bread, crumbled and boiled with the milk.

Mix the boiled milk and bread well with the sugar and butter, and divide the mixture into two equal parts; add the beaten yolks to one part and the grated cocoanut and beaten whites to another; flavor the white pies with a teaspoonful of brandy and the same quantity of rose water, and the yellow with the juice and grated rind of a lemon and an orange; bake in open shells of puff paste, with puffed edges.

Peach Pie. — If made of ripe peaches, proceed precisely as for "Austrian Fruit Pie," substituting for the plums ripe peaches, pared, quartered, and sugared.

Peach Pie of Preserved Peaches. — Fill open shells of fine puff paste with preserved peaches, and bake in a quick oven.

Peach Pie with Meringue. — Proceed as above, but cover the peaches with a stiff meringue an inch thick, flavored with bitter almond..

Peach Pie with Canned Peaches. — Line a deep dish with good puff paste; put in a layer of canned peaches, sugar lightly, and proceed in this way until the dish is full; cover with paste and bake; or omit the paste cover, and when just baked put on a thick meringue, and put back in the oven until set.

Dried-Peach Pie. — One quart of stewed dried peaches, stewed with a little lemon peel, sweetened to taste, strained through a sieve, and enriched by a little cornstarch mixed with cold water.

Fill open crusts of paste, cover with crossbars of paste, and bake. This is the best of all peach pies.

Cherry Pie, No. 1. — Stone fine, ripe cherries, line a dish with good pie crust, fill with cherries, sugaring them well, cover with crust, and bake.

Cherry Pie, No. 2. — Proceed as above, but bake in open shells as for " Austrian Fruit Pie," and pour over the cherries, after they are sugared, a teacupful of cherry juice.

Sweet-Potato Pie. — Two pounds of sweet potatoes, boiled and mashed fine; one pound of butter beaten to a cream; one pound of sugar creamed with the butter; five eggs beaten light; one wineglassful of wine; one wineglassful of brandy; one wineglassful of rose water; half a pint of cream; two teaspoonf uls of spice.

Beat the boiled potatoes by degrees into the butter and sugar, then add the eggs and the other ingredients in order; till the open puff shells with the mixture, and bake in a quick oven. The above quantity will make seven puddingplatefuls.

Yam Pie. — One pound of boiled and grated yam; half a pound of butter; half a pound of sugar creamed with the butter; one wineglassful of sherry; one wineglassful of rose water; half a teaspoonful of grated nutmeg; six eggs beaten light.

Mix the grated yam with the creamed butter and sugar, and add the other ingredients in order; if the mixture should not be sufficiently liquid, add a little cream; bake in an open crust of puff paste, with a rolled border.

Pickering Squash Pie. — One quart of boiled milk; three pints of squash, stewed and strained; one pound of butter and one and a quarter pounds of sifted sugar beaten to a cream; one nutmeg, grated; four tablespoonfuls of rose water; four eggs, the whites and yolks beaten separately; seven sailor's biscuits, pounded fine.

Proceed precisely as for "Yam Pie," only scalding the biscuits with milk, and adding the beaten eggs to the creamed butter and sugar; then the other ingredients in order; bake in open shells of puff paste, with thick edges.

Connecticut Pumpkin Pie, No. 1. — One quart of milk; one pint of stewed and strained pumpkin; two cupfuls of powdered sugar; four eggs, well beaten; one teaspoonful of salt; flavoring to taste, either ginger, mace, cinnamon, or grated lemon peel.

Stir the flavoring well into the pumpkin, and, having the milk heated to the boiling-point in a pitcher placed in a kettle of boiling water, pour it gradually into the pumpkin; return the mixture to the pitcher in the kettle, have the eggs and sugar well beaten, and put a small portion of the hot pumpkin in and heat it; add more until the eggs are cooked; put it again into the pitcher, stir and pour it into the pie-plates, and bake it immediately with a lower crust only.

Pumpkin Pie, No. 2. — One quart of pumpkin, stewed and strained; one quart of milk; one cupful of sugar; seven eggs, the whites and yolks beaten separately; one teaspoonful of ginger; one teaspoonful of mace; one teaspoonful of cinnamon.

Beat all well together, and bake in crust without a cover.

Pumpkin Pie, No. 3. — One quart of pumpkin, stewed and strained; nine eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately; two quarts of milk; one teaspoonful of mace; one teaspoonful of cinnamon; one teaspoonful of nutmeg; one and a half cupfuls of the best light-brown sugar.

Beat all well together, and bake in crust without a cover.

Raisin Pie. — One cupful of crackers, rolled fine; one cupful of cold water; the juice and rind of one lemon; one cupful of raisins, stoned and chopped fine; one cupful of sugar.

Blend all thoroughly together, and add one egg well beaten; bake with a thin upper and under crust; wash the top crust with beaten white of egg; bake in a moderate oven.

Orange Pie. — One large orange, the juice, and half the grated rind; half a lemon, the juice, and the grated peel; three eggs; three quarters of a cupful of white sugar; two tablespoonfnls of fresh butter; nutmeg to taste.

Cream the butter and sugar, beating in the orange and lemon until light, add the beaten yolks, fill two pastry shells and bake; beat the whites very light with two ta blespoonfuls of powdered sugar, and when the pies are done spread it over them, returning to the oven for a few minutes.

Cherry Tart of Preserved Cherries. — Proceed as for other pies.

Strawberry Tart. — Pick over the strawberries carefully, and arrange them in layers in a deep puff crust, sprinkling each layer thickly with sugar; fill very full, pour in a teacupful of strawberry juice, cover with crust, and bake.

Cream Strawberry Tart. — Proceed as above, putting on a very thick top crust with a slit in the top; when the pie is done, pour in through the slit in the top, by means of a small funnel, the following mixture:

One small cupful of milk and cream, half and half, heated to boiling; the whites of two eggs beaten light and stirred into the boiling milk; one tablespoonful of white sugar; half a teaspoonful of corn-starch wet in cold milk.

Boil all together three minutes, stirring until quite smooth; set aside to cool before pouring into the tart; when you have poured in the cream set the tart aside to cool, and serve with powdered sugar sifted over the top.

Raspberry Pie or Tart. — Make just as you do "Strawberry Tart."

Cream Raspberry Pie or Tart. — Make as "Cream Strawberry Tart."

Blackberry-and-IIuckleberry Pie or Tart. — Proceed as for "Strawberry Tart," sweetening to taste.

Currant Pie. — Prepare a good family pie crust, slightly sweetened; string and pick over the currants with extreme care, and sweeten abundantly with powdered sugar; bake in open shell of pie crust, with crossbars of paste over the top; serve cold, with powdered sugar sprinkled over it.

Currant-and-Raspberry Tart. — Three cupfuls of currants; one cupful of raspberries.

Mix well together, sweeten, and then bake in a deep pie-dish lined with puff paste, and with paste cover; eat cold, with powdered sugar if necessary.

Green-Gooseberry Tart. — Pick, top, and tail the gooseberries; stew slowly in a porcelain kettle, with just enough water to keep them from burning, until they break; then sweeten thoroughly, and set aside to cool; when cold, put into a deep pastry shell of puff paste, cover with a top crust of puff paste, and bake; brush all over with beaten egg while hot, and set back in the oven to glaze.

Ripe-Gooseberry Tart. — Pick, top, and tail the gooseberries, and bake in a deep shell of puff paste, strewing among them as much sugar as they need; cover with puff paste, and bake.

Ripe-Plum Pie. — Proceed as for " Austrian Fruit Pie," using fine, large plums.

Preserved-Plum Pie. — Fill an open, shallow shell of puff paste with preserved green gages; cover with crossbars of paste, and bake.

Plum Tart. — Stone the plums, put into a deep shell of puff paste, scatter sugar over them (to taste), pour in half a cupful of plum juice, cover with paste, and bake.

Damson Tart. — Proceed precisely as above, sweetening abundantly.

Cranberry Pie. — Wash and pick over the cranberries, and stew in a porcelain saucepan with a very little water until they are very tender and burst; then press through a strainer, sweeten to taste, and bake in open shells of puff paste with crossbars of pastry on the top.

Rhubarb Pie. — Skin the stalks with care, cut into small pieces, put into a saucepan with very little water, and stew slowly until soft; sweeten while hot, pour into freshly baked shells, and serve hot or cold, as you like.

Or, you may add a small lump of butter and a wellbeaten egg to the hot-sweetened rhubarb, and bake in pastry.

Rhubarb Tart. — Peel and cut the stalks into small pieces, and arrange in deep shells of puff paste, sugaring them well, and mixing in seeded raisins; cover with puff paste, and bake nearly three quarters of an hour; brush with egg while hot, and return to the oven to glaze; eat cold.

PUDDINGS.

GENERAL DIRECTIONS.

Puddings are of two kinds — boiled and baked. Boiled puddings should be put into strong bags of coarse linen, well floured inside. These bags should be neatly and firmly sewed, and carefully washed (by themselves) every time they are used. They should always be kept apart from all other household linen, and tightly closed in a tin box lest they should contract some odor.

Amber Pudding. — Mix well together the yolks of three or four eggs, a quarter of a pound of lump sugar, a little grated nutmeg, and the finely grated rind of one small orange. The eggs should, of course, be well beaten, whites and yolks separately; melt a quarter of a pound of butter, and mix thoroughly with the eggs, etc.; have ready a deep pie-dish lined with puff paste, pour in the mixture, and bake half an hour. It is best cold.

,Venus Pudding. — Take a quart mould, butter it well, and ornament it with candied ginger; make a rich custard with the yolks of twelve and the whites of six eggs, a pint of cream, and loaf sugar to taste; then dissolve one ounce of gelatine in sufficient milk to fill up the mould; when cold add a glassful of rum or sherry; flavor with bitter almond; when well mixed pour into the mould, and set it on the ice to set. The longer it is on the ice, the better.

Fine Apple Pudding. — Peel and core some fine apples, place them in a baking-dish, and put in the centre of each one a spoonful of cherry or any other preserve; beat ten yolks of eggs with a pound of sugar, a pint of cream, the grated rind of two oranges, and some cinnamon; pour this over the apples, and let it bake in a moderate oven. This is served without sauce.

Simple Apple Pudding. — Beat up six eggs with one full cup of powdered sugar and a little cardamom; peel, core, and fill the centre of your apples with preserves; pour a quart of sweet cream over this, and let it bake.

Apple Snow. — Take one dozen large apples, bake and peel them, and pass them through a colander; add three handfuls of grated black bread, three ounces of sugar, a spoonful of cinnamon or cardamom, beat the whites of eighteen eggs to a snow, stir in the apples, put it in a warm buttered baking-dish, and bake it in a moderate oven half an hour.

Chocolate Pudding. — Ten eggs; one loaf of stale bread, grated; six ounces of chocolate, grated; half of a vanilla bean; sugar to taste; a pinch of cinnamon.

Beat all this together with a quart of sour cream, bake it in the oven, and serve with sweet-cream sauce.

Tansy Pudding. — Crumbs of a small loaf of baker's . bread soaked in a pint of milk; three eggs, well beaten ; a pinch of salt; one tablespoonf ul of white sugar; one tablespoonful of melted butter; as many fresh tansy leaves as will cover the palm of the hand, chopped fine, and stirred in last of all.

Steam or boil for two hours, and eat with a rich, hot, sweet sauce, flavored with lemon.

Apple Charlotte. — Pare and core the apples; toast some bread in butter; then put this in a dish with sugar, cinnamon, lemon peel, raisins, and a little wine; line a mould with slices of bread, and pour this in and bake.

Layer Apple Pudding. — Make a paste of beef suet, chopped fine, and the finest sifted flour, with water enough to enable you to mould it into a paste, and a tiny pinch of salt; mix well and smoothly, and roll out into a smooth paste; line with this a well-buttered tin; put in a layer of pared, cored, and sliced apples, a little lemon, and brown sugar; then a thin layer of paste, then another of apples prepared as before, and repeat these layers until the dish is full; cover in with paste, and boil for nearly three hours. A little butter and nutmeg mixed with the apples is an improvement to this excellent pudding.

Apple-Custard Pudding. — Line a buttered puddingdish with slices of stale sponge cake or light white bread; then make a filling as follows: One pint of sweet milk, one pint of smooth apple sauce well seasoned, three eggs well beaten, and enough cinnamon to flavor. This quantity will make two small puddings.

Dried-Peach Pudding. — One pint of dried bread crumbs softened with boiling water; one spoonful of melted butter stirred in; two eggs, well beaten; one pint of dried peaches stewed soft.

Sweeten to taste, flavor with a little orange peel, put into a buttered pudding-dish, and bake half an hour.

Cream Padding with Cherries. — A quarter of a pound each of fine flour, sugar, and butter, mixed with a quart of warm milk.

Boil to the consistency of custard; add six eggs,yolks and whites having been beaten separately to the utmost; stir in a cupful of preserved cherries, pour into a deep puddingdish, set in a pan of water, and bake in the oven one hour.

Prince Albert Pudding. — Half a pound of fresh butter; cream it, and mix half a pound of pulverized sugar by degrees; when thoroughly mixed, add the yolks of five eggs and the whites beaten to a snow; then stir in half a pound of finely sifted flour, half a pound of stoned raisins, and a suspicion of lemon peel or grated nutmeg; boil this pudding in a well-buttered mould or floured pudding-cloth; let it cook three hours; serve with punch, wine, or fruit sauce, as preferred.

Apple Pudding, Baked. — Take the crumbs of three fresh French rolls, soak in sweet milk, squeeze out the milk, and put the bread in a saucepan; add half a pound of butter; let it cook; when cold stir in twelve eggs, grease a plate, and put in this paste; pare your apples, and let them simmer gently a few minutes in butter; sprinkle with powdered cinnamon; rub some sugar over the rind of a lemon, and sprinkle it over the apples; make another layer of bread over the apples, bake an hour, and serve with sweet cream.

Bread-and-Butter Pudding (Courlande receipt). — Take thin slices of bread and spread them thickly with butter; butter a baking-dish well, place in the bottom a layer of bread, sprinkle with cinnamon, sugar, cover thickly with currants, stoned, and proceed with alternate layers of bread and raisins, etc., until the dish is quite full; then in nine eggs stir a quart of cream, and pour it over the pudding; let it soak for a quarter of an hour before baking, and serve with fruit or cream sauce.

Lemon Buhbert (Courlande receipt). — Boil one large lemon till it is tender enough for a straw to pierce, squeeze out the juice, grate the rind in a dish, and stir till it becomes of the consistency of butter; then add five ounces of sugar, the yolks of eight eggs, and a pinch of cardamom, and stir for an hour; beat the whites of the eight eggs to a stiff froth, add quickly to the rest of the ingredients, pour this into a buttered form, and cook it three quarters of an hour in a moderate oven. This can be eaten with wine sauce or without, as preferred.

Boiled Pudding (Livonian receipt). — In a quart of sweet milk stir the yolks of twelve eggs, and twelve spoonfuls of flour; beat till thoroughly mixed; then add a handful of almonds, several bitter ones (blanched), a cupful of currants, a quarter of a pound of butter, sugar to sweeten well, and sprinkle with cinnamon; tie up in a pudding-cloth previously soaked in butter and well sprinkled with bread crumbs, and cook steadily for two hours.

Cherry Pudding (Receipt of Riga). — Cook in a pint of cream a quarter of a pound of butter until thick; let it cool; when cold add eight eggs, a pinch of cinnamon, several cloves, a pound of cherries, lemon peel, and sugar to sweeten well; grate the crust from four French rolls, which cut into dice; pour over these enough milk to wet through, and when soaked squeeze through a towel; mix this bread thoroughly with the foregoing ingredients, add the whites of the eight eggs beaten to a stiff froth, pour in a buttered mould strewed with bread crumbs, and cook for an hour in an even oven.

Sauce. — Cook a pound of stoned cherries till soft; add a glassful and a half of red wine, a little lemon juice, cloves, some grated crackers, and sugar to sweeten well; pour over the pudding, and serve hot.

George Pudding. — Boil very tender a handful of whole rice in a quart of milk with a little lemon peel; mix with this twelve apples, peeled, cored, sliced, and boiled to a pulp, the yolks of four eggs well beaten, two ounces of candied orange peel and citron peel cut fine, one glassful of white wine, sugar to taste, and the whites of four eggs, beaten to the stiffest possible froth, added at the last; line a deep dish or mould with family pie crust (" Puff Paste "), pour in the pudding, and bake in a good oven to a light brown; turn it out of the mould, and serve it with the following sauce poured over it. It should be placed on the dish bottom upward.

Sauce. — Two glassfuls of white wine; one tablespoonf ul of sifted white sugar; the yolks of two eggs, well beaten; a bit of butter as large as a walnut. Simmer without boiling, and pour to and from the saucepan until it is of the proper thickness; serve at once.

Half-hour Pudding. — One pint of sweet milk; four eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately to the utmost; five tablespoonf uls of sifted flour; a pinch of salt.

Mix as usual, and bake in a buttered mould twenty minutes; Serve with hard sauce.

Batter Pudding. — Four eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately to the utmost; one and a half pints of sweet milk; a pinch of salt; enough sifted flour to make a batter the thickness of rich cream.

Mix as usual, and bake until done; serve with wine sauce. If properly made and baked batter pudding should be very light.

Baked Indian Pudding. — One quart of sweet milk; four handfuls of Indian meal, sifted; two tablespoonfuls of cinnamon; three quarters of a cupful of snet, freed from strings and chopped to powder; half a cupful of sugar _ one egg, well beaten.

Put the milk on the fire, and when it begins to boil stir in the other ingredients; when well mixed pour into a buttered mould, and bake an hour.

Bread Pudding. — Two cupfuls of dry, finely rolled stale bread crumbs; four eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately; one quart of rich milk; two tablespoonfuls of melted butter; nutmeg to taste; one quarter of a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water.

Soak the bread crumbs in milk; stir in the beaten yolks, then the butter, seasoning,and soda, and, lastly, the whites; bake to a fine brown, and eat hot with pudding sauce. This pudding is equally good boiled.

Fruit Bread Pudding. — Take slips of stale white bread cut like finger biscuits, and line your mould with them, pressing them closely so that they may adhere well to the mould. When this is done, fill the mould with alternate layers of stewed fruit (damsons are the best fruit for this purpose), and very thin slices of bread; the bread should be buttered, and dusted with powdered sugar, and the layers of fruit should be fully an inch thick; when the mould is quite full, press down the pudding with a plate, and put'a weight on the top of the plate. It should be made the day before it is to be eaten, and should be served with clotted cream poured over it.

Sponge-Cake Pudding. — Take six or eight small round sponge cakes, and as many macaroons; split and seed some large raisins, and stick them on the inside of a wellbuttered mould; put in the cake, and pour over it a wineglassful of sherry, cognac, or curacoa; Blanch and pound some sweet almonds, and sprinkle them over the cakes; fill up the mould with cold custard, and steam one hour; turn out of the mould, and serve.

Brown Betty. — One cupful of bread crumbs; twocupfuls of chopped apples (sour apples are best); half a cupful of sugar; one cupful of Sultana raisins, stoned and chopped; one teaspoon ful of cinnamon; two tablespoonfuls of butter, cut into small bits.

Butter a deep dish, and put a layer of chopped apples and raisins at the bottom; sprinkle with sugar, a few bits of butter, and bread crumbs; proceed in this order until the dish is full, having a thick layer of bread crumbs at the top; cover closely, and steam three quarters of an hour in a moderate oven; then uncover, and brown quickly; serve in the dish in which it is baked. This is good hot or cold; eat with sweet sauce, or old Humphrey's aigre doux sauce.

Apple-and-Plum Pudding. — Three quarters of a pound of fine tart apples, pared and chopped; three quarters of a pound of sugar; three quarters of a pound of fine sifted flour; half a pound of beef suet, rubbed fine; three quarters of a pound of raisins, seeded and chopped; six eggs; one teaspoonful of nutmeg; one teaspoonful of powdered cloves; one teaspoonful of salt; half a wineglassful of brown sherry, and the same of brandy.

Stir the beaten yolks and sugar very light; add the suet, apples, and spice; then the raisins, well dredged with flour; then the flour and liquor; lastly, the whites beaten very stiff. Bake in two buttered moulds in a moderate oven an hour and a half at least; eat hot with sauceThis pudding is equally good boiled.

Apple-and-Tapiooa Pudding. — One teacupful of tapioca; six apples, pared and cored; the apples should be sound and savory; one quart of water; one teaspoonful of salt.

Cover the tapioca with three cupf uls of lukewarm water, and set in a tolerably warm place to soak for five or six hours, stirring now and then; pack the apples in a deep earthen dish, adding a cupful of lukewarm water; cover closely, and steam in a moderate oven until they are soft, turning them occasionally that they may cook on all sides; then turn out the liquid in the dish; fill up the centre of each apple with loaf sugar; stick a piece of lemon peel and 'a clove in each; pour over the tapioca, and bake one hour; eat warm or cold with the sauce you prefer.

Baked Apple Dumplings. — One quart of flour; one tablespoonful of lard; one tablespoonful of butter; two cupfuls of milk; one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water; two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar, sifted into the dry flour; one saltspoonful of salt.

Sift the flour with the cream of tartar; chop in the shortening; put in the soda, and moisten quickly, just stiff enough to roll into a paste less than half an inch thick; cut into squares, and lay in the centre of each a juicy, tart apple, pared and cored; bring the corners of the square neatly together, and pinch them slightly; lay in a buttered baking-pan, the pinched edges downward, and bake to a fine brown; when done, brush over with beaten white of eggs, and set in the oven to glaze for two or three minutes; sift powdered sugar over them, and eat hot, with rich, sweet sauce.

Boiled Apple Dumplings, or any other Fruit Dumplings. — One quart of finest white flour, sifted; one tablespoonful of lard and the same of butter; one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in hot water ; two teaspoonfuls of cream of tartar sifted through the flour; one saltspoonful of salt; two cupfuls of sweet milk, or enough to make the flour into soft dough; one quart of chopped apples, sliced peaches, stewed dried peaches, cherries, stoned plums, raspberries, or any other berries, or jam, preserves, or canned fruit.

Roll out the crust less than half an inch thick, into an oblong sheet; cover thickly with the fruit, and sprinkle with sugar; roll up closely, leaving the fruit inside; pinch the ends of the folded roll together, and baste up in a bag, which should previously have been dipped into boiling water, wrung out, and floured inside; boil an hour and a half; serve hot with hard sauce.

Boiled Apple Dumplings, Small. — Make a paste as above, cut into squares, put into the centre of each an apple; tie up each dumpling in a little bag, which bag should be dipped in boiling water, wrung out, and floured inside; boil one hour.

Boiled Suet Dumplings. — Two cupfuls of finely rolled bread crumbs soaked in milk; one cupful of beef suet, freed from strings and powdered; four eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately, and very light; one tablespoonful of sugar; one teaspoonfnl of cream of tartar sifted into the flour; half a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in boiling water; one teaspoonful of salt; enough milk to mix into a stiff paste; make into large balls with floured hands; put into dumpling-cloths dipped into hot water and floured inside; leave room to swell, and tie the strings very tightly; boil three quarters of an hour, and serve hot with a good sauce.

Rice Dumplings. — One pound of rice boiled, without stirring, until soft; twelve apples, pared and cored; currant or any other tart jelly.

Let the rice cool and dry upon a sieve; dip the dumpling-cloths in hot water, wring out and flour; put a handful of the cold rice upon each, spreading it out into a smooth sheet; lay in the centre an apple, fill the hole left by the core with some tart jelly, draw up the cloth carefully to enclose the apple with a coating of rice; tie, and boil one hour; turn out with care, and eat with sweetened cream.

Duff Plum Pudding. — Six ounces of finest white flour, sifted; one teaspoonful of salt; two teaspoonfuls of baking powder; one teaspoonful of cinnamon; four ounces of chopped suet; four ounces of sugar; four ounces of well-washed currants, or raisins, stoned; half a pint of milk; one egg.

Mix all well and smoothly together, put into a greased and floured bag, and steam three hours; use sauce to taste.

Plum Pudding, Poor-Man's. — Half a pound of finest white flour, sifted; four ounces of raisins, stoned and chopped; four ounces of currants, well washed; four ounces of chopped suet; three tablespoonfuls of molasses; one teaspoonful of ground spice; one gill of cold water.

Mix smoothly together, put into a greased and floured mould, and steam until you are ready to put on the table.

Centennial Pudding. — One short pint of grated bread crumbs; one quart of boiling milk; sugar to taste; yolks of five eggs well beaten; vanilla or bitter-almond flavoring.

Pour the boiling milk over the bread crumbs, and let it stand for an hour; then beat smooth, and add the sugar, then the beaten yolks, and the flavoring; bake in a round baking-dish in a quick oven, but not hot enough to brown it; when cold, spread over it a thick layer of jelly or jam; beat the whites of the eggs with sugar, as for icing, and spread thickly on top of the jelly; set in the oven to harden; cat cold.

Transparent Pudding. — Half a pound of fresh butter, warmed, but not melted; half a pound of sifted sugar mixed with the butter; half a nutmeg, grated; eight eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately, to the utmost.

Beat the butter and sugar light, and then add the nutmeg and the beaten eggs, which should be stirred in gradually; flavor with vanilla, almond, peach, or rose water; stir hard; butter a deep dish, and bake half an hour; eat cold.

Crystal Palace Pudding. — One large teaspoonful of cornflour, mixed smooth with half a teacupful of new milk, half a pint of cream, sugar to taste, flavoring to taste, and half an ounce of isinglass steeped in half a teacupful of milk for some hours; boil ten minutes over the fire, stirring one way; take from the fire, and add quickly two eggs well beaten; stir till nearly cold; pour into moulds.

Treacle Pudding. — Half a pound of flour; one ounce of suet, finely chopped; a quarter of a pint of treacle, sugar-house molasses; one pinch of salt; one teaspoonful of ginger; one teaspoonful of baking-powder.

Mix smoothly, cover with greased paper, and steam three hours, taking care that it never stops cooking.

Eve's Pudding. — One heaping cupful of fine, dry bread crumbs; half a pound of pared and chopped apples; half a pound of Sultana raisins, seeded and chopped; six ounces of currants, washed and dried; six eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately to the utmost; one teaspoonful of grated nutmeg, and the same of allspice; one wineglassful of brandy; one cupful of sugar; one teaspoonful of salt; half a pound of suet chopped to powder.

Work the sugar into the beaten yolks, then the suet and bread crumbs with the chopped apples, next the brandy and spice, then the whipped whites, and, lastly, the fruit well dredged with flour; boil in a buttered bowl or mould three hours; eat hot with sauce.

Fruit Pyramid. — Make some good, light crust, roll out a quarter of an inch thick, and cut in graduated rounds; i. e., the bottom round the size of a tea-plate, the top or sixth round not more than three inches across, the other rounds graduated in proportion; spread the bottom round with stoned cherries or other fruit, and sprinkle with sugar; place a smaller round of paste on this, and proceed as before to cover with fruit and sugar, being careful, as you build up, to fold the margins of paste over the fruit in such a way as to weld each layer of paste to the one above it; have ready a conical cap of stout muslin adapted to the height and width of your pyramid, dip the bag in boiling water, wring out, flour inside, and draw gently over all. It should be large enough to meet and tie under the base without cramping the pyramid. Boil two hours, and eat with sweet sauce.

Or, this can be boiled in a mould shaped like an Egyptian pyramid.

Huckleberry Pudding. — One pint of milk; two eggs; enough sifted flour for a thick batter; one gill of baker's yeast; one saltspoonful of salt; one teaspoonful of soda dissolved in boiling water; nearly a quart of berries well dredged with flour.

Make a batter of eggs, milk, flour, yeast, salt, and soda, and set it to rise in a warm place about four hours; when you are ready to boil it, stir in the dredged fruit quickly and lightly; boil in a floured cloth for two hours; eat hot with hard sauce.

Hasty Pudding. — Have some boiling water in a pot, salt it, and stir in Indian meal, a little at a time; when the water is all in stir it, set it on the top of the stove, and let it boil slowly for three hours; when taken out it should be so soft that it will in a few minutes settle down smoothly in the dish; when perfectly cold turn it out on the moulding-board, and dredge with wheaten flour until you can roll it out; cut into cakes a little less than half an inch thick, and fry in dripping.

Indian Meal Pudding, Fried. — One pint of white Indian meal; one spoonful of sugar; enough boiling water to moisten it.

Make up into flat cakes, and fry in a very little boiling lard; split, butter, and serve.

Boiled Indian Pudding. — One quart of Indian meal, sifted; one quart of rich, sweet milk; a quarter of a pound of beef suet, freed from strings and powdered; one teaspoonful of salt; three eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately.

Scald the milk, and while boiling-hot stir in the meal, salt, and suet; when cold add the yolks beaten with the sugar, then the whites; dip the pudding-bag in hot water, wring out, flour it, and fill half full with the mixture, as it will swell; eat very hot, with butter and brown sugar.

Boiled Indian Pudding, William Penn's. — One pint of sour milk; two cupfuls of Indian meal; one cupful of flour; a lump of butter half the size of an egg; one teaspoonful of salt; one dessertspoonful of soda.

Mix all together smoothly; then take a three-quart pan with a light cover, grease it, pour in a little batter, then some fruit or jam (raspberry is best), then more batter, and so on; set in a pan of boiling water, and boil two hours.

Baked, Indian Pudding, Virginia. — One teacupful of Indian meal mixed with warm water; one quarter of a pound of melted butter; four eggs beaten light; brown sugar to taste; one tablespoonful of molasses,; one teaspoonful of brandy; one teaspoonf ul of powdered cinnamon; a little finely chopped orange peel; a few currants.

Bake in a shallow earthen dish for one hour. This quantity is enough for two dishes, as it should not be more than an inch in depth.

Baked Indian Pudding, New York. — One quart of milk; six tablespoonf uls of Indian meal thickened with a little milk; one cupful of molasses; one teaspoonf ul of salt.

Boil the milk; add the Indian meal; when it thickens, pour it into a deep dish, adding the molasses and the salt; before you put it into the oven add one pint more of cold milk, but do not stir it; bake four hours.

Baked Indian Pudding, Pennsylvania. — One pint of Indian meal, sifted; one pint of boiling milk; one pint of boiling water; one cupful of butter; two tablespoonfuls of wheat flour; four dessertspoonfuls of molasses; four dessertspoonfuls of sugar; five eggs, well beaten; one wineglassful of brandy; a little salt and nutmeg.

Scald the meal in the water; then add the milk and the other ingredients in order; bake an hour.

Baked Indian Pudding, Boston — Boil a quart of milk, stir in three gills of Indian meal, next stir in half a pint of molasses, and let all cool; butter a deep earthen dish, put in a quarter of a pound of chopped suet, and a tablespoonful of salt; turn in the pudding, add a tablespoonful of ground ginger, and stir hard; bake five hours. When baked in a brick oven, it should be left in it overnight.

Lemon Pudding, No. 1. — The grated rind and juice of two lemons; half a pound of fresh butter; two tablespotmf nls of fine white flour; a little cardamom; sugar to taste; grated nutmeg.

Mix well and set on the fire; when thoroughly warmed through, take off the fire and beat till cold; add the whites of twelve eggs well beaten, and when in the oven spread them over the top.

Lemon Pudding, No. 2. — The peels of two large lemons grated on sugar; half a pound of butter; the juice of one large lemon; the yolks of ten eggs; the whites of five eggs.

Beat all together, and, lining a deep pudding-dish with puff paste, bake the lemon pudding in it; while baking, beat the whites of the remaining five eggs to a stiff froth, whip in fine white sugar to taste, cover the top of the pudding (when baked) with the meringue, and return to the oven for a moment to brown; eat cold.

Lemon Pudding, No. 3. — One cupful of sugar; four eggs; two tablespoonf uls of cornstarch moistened with cold water; two lemons, the juice of both, and rind of one; one pint of milk; one tablespoonful of butter.

Heat the milk to boiling, and stir in the corn-starch; boil five minutes, stirring constantly; while hot add the butter, and set away to cool; beat the eggs light, and add the sugar, lemon juice, and rind; beat to a cream, add to the milk when cold, and bake in a buttered pudding-dish.

Long Branch Pudding. — Two cupfuls of sifted flour; half a cupful of molasses; half a tumblerful of water; a quarter of a cupful of butter; one small teaspoonful of soda; one teaspoonful of ground cinnamon and cloves, mixed.

Beat it well, and stir in last of all a quart of fresh fruit, either blackberries, whortleberries, raspberries, or stoned cherries; if cherries are used, omit the spice; boil for two hours in a bag, and serve hot, with wine sauce or hard sauce.

Corn-starch Meringue Pudding. — Four teaspoonfuls of corn-starch; four eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately; three quarters of a cupful of powdered sugar; one quart of sweet milk; half a cupful of preserve or fruit jelly.

Moisten the corn-starch with a little cold milk, then stir it into the boiling milk; boil fifteen minutes, stirring all the while; remove from the fire, and stir in while hot the yolks of the eggs beaten up with sugar, and floured; pour into a buttered pudding-dish, and bake fifteen minutes; then spread with a layer of preserve, and upon that the whites, which must have been beaten up stiffly with a little sugar; bake five minutes covered, then brown, and serve hot or cold, as you prefer.

Orange - Marmalade Pudding. — One cupful of fine rolled bread crumbs; half a cupful of sugar; one cupful of milk or cream ; four eggs well beaten, whites and yolks separately; two teaspoonfuls of butter; one cupful of orange marmalade.

Rub the butter and sugar together; add the yolks, milk, bread crumbs, and whites; put a layer of this in a wellbuttered mould; spread thickly with marmalade; then put in another layer of the mixture, and so on, until the dish is full, having the custard mixture at the top; bake in a moderate oven an hour; turn ont of the mould on a dish, and serve with cream, or aigre doux sauce.

Macaroni or Vermicelli Pudding. — One cupful of macaroni or vermicelli, broken into inch lengths; one quart of milk; four eggs; half a lemon, juice and grated rind; two tablespoonfuls of butter; three quarters of a cupful of sugar.

Simmer the macaroni in half the milk until tender; while hot, stir in the butter, yolks well beaten up with the sugar, the lemon, and, lastly, the whipped whites; bake in a buttered mould half an hour, or until nicely browned.

Tapioca Pudding. — One cupful of tapioca; one quart of milk; five eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately; two tablespoonfuls of butter, melted; two tablespoonfuls of sugar.

Soak the tapioca in enough cold water to cover it for two hours; drain off the water; soak two hours longer in warm milk; then, when the sugar and butter are beaten to a cream, add the yolks, milk, and tapioca; last of all the beaten whites; stir long and well, and bake in a buttered dish; eat hot with sauce.

Neapolitan Pudding. — One large cupful of fine bread crumbs, soaked in milk; three quarters of a cupful of sugar; one lemon, juice, and grated rind; six eggs, yolks and whites beaten separately; half a pound of stale sponge cake; half a pound of almond macaroons; half a cupful of jelly or jam; one wineglassful of sherry; half a cupful of milk, poured on the bread crumbs; one tablespoonful of melted butter.

Rub the butter and sugar together, then add the beaten yolks, the soaked bread crumbs, lemon, and rind; beat to a smooth, light paste, and then add the beaten whites; butter your mould very well, put in the bottom a layer of light bread crumbs, then one of macaroons; wet with the wine; cover with a layer of custard, then of sponge cake, then jam, then macaroons again, and so on, until the dish is full; cover closely; steam in the oven three quarters of an hour; Uncover and brown; turn out carefully, and cat with currant-jelly sauce.

Baked Orange Pudding. — The rind of one orange, powdered finely with a pestle and mortar; three tablespoonfuls of sifted white sugar; the yolks of four eggs, and the juice of half a lemon.

Beat all together in a basin for a quarter of an hour, then put in slowly, and stirring gently all the time, the whites (which must previously have been beaten to the stiffest froth); when all is smoothly mixed together, pour into a buttered mould; bake twelve minutes in a very hot oven, and serve immediately.

Cabinet Pudding d p Anglaise. — Line a well-buttered mould with seeded Sultanas or dried cherries; then with slices of French roll; next put a layer of lady - fingers and macaroons; then bread again, sprinkling over it at times two liqueurglassfuls of brandy (one will be sufficient for a small pudding); beat up four or five eggs with a pint of milk or cream, sweeten it to taste, and add a little nutmeg, and the rind of a lemon finely grated; fill up the mould with this mixture, and boil one hour and a half.

One-Pound Plum Pudding. — One pound of beef suet; half a pound of finest white flour, sifted; half a pound of bread crumbs rolled and passed through a colander; one pound of sugar; one pound of currants, picked, washed, and dredged; two pounds of raisins, seeded and chopped; half a pound of candied peel; rind of one lemon, grated; one teaspoonful of spice; one tiny pinch of salt; eight eggs; one wineglassful of brandy; enough milk to mix it (about a pint).

Chop the suet well, and then roll it smooth, and mix it with the flour; next add the bread crumbs, then the currants, sugar, raisins, salt, candied peel, and spice; then the eggs, which should be beaten to their utmost capacity, yolks and whites separately, and the milk; stir steadily and long, until the batter is perfectly smooth; then pour into a buttered tin mould, cover closely, and tie a cloth round it to prevent the cover from budging; when the water boils furiously put the pudding into the pot, and let it boil steadily for six or seven hours, adding boiling water as it boils away. This pudding may be served either with egg sauce, or hard sauce; it should have brandy poured round it and lighted, and a sprig of holly stuck in the middle.

Poor-Marts Rice Pudding, No. 1. — Butter a deep earthenware dish, and pour into it one quart of the best fresh milk, one tablespoonful of raw rice, sugar to taste, a piece of butter half the size of an egg, a stick of cinnamon, and a piece of lemon peel; simmer three hours in a good oven; eat ice cold.

Poor - Man! s Rice Pudding, No. 2. — Two quarts of milk; one teacupful of rice; four tablespoonfuls of best brown sugar; one small stick of cinnamon; dried peel of half an orange.

Put into an oven, and bake slowly from two and a half to three hours.

Beetor Us Unrivalled Plum Pudding. — One and a half pounds of Muscatel raisins, seeded and cut up ; one pound of Sultana raisins, seeded and cut up; two pounds of rolled bread crumbs; two pounds of finest moist sugar; two pounds of suet, freed from strings and powdered; six ounces of mixed candied peel; grated rind of two lemons; one ounce of ground nutmeg; one ounce of ground cinnamon; half an ounce of pounded bitter almonds; a quarter of a pint of the best brandy; sixteen eggs well beaten.

Stone and cut up the raisins; wash, dry, and dredge the currants; cut the candied peel into the thinnest possible slices; sift the sugar, and beat the eggs well; mix all the dry ingredients well and thoroughly together, then add little by little the beaten eggs and the brandy. When all the ingredients are well mixed together, beat long and hard; then well bntter and flour a stout new puddingcloth, put the pudding in, tie it closely, and boil from six to eight hours; stick a sprig of holly in the middle when you serve it; dot it thickly with blanched almonds, and serve with brandy on fire.

William Penn's Plum Pudding. — Yolks of twelve eggs, and whites of six, beaten separately and well; one pound of best Sultana raisins, stoned; one pound of best currants, picked, washed, dried, and rubbed on a towel; one pound of beef suet, chopped and shredded; one pound of flour, sifted; half a pound of loaf sugar, grated; a quarter of a pound of citron, snipped very fine; half a nutmeg, grated; one teaspoonf ul of powdered ginger; half a pint of rich, fresh cream; one wineglassful of the best brandy; one wineglassful of rose water.

Mix the flour with the fruit; stir in the whipped eggs; add the cream, spices, citron, and suet; then the sugar, brandy, and rose water; beat well all the time it is being mixed, then tie tight in a pudding-bag well dusted with flour; let it boil for six hours, turning it in the pot from time to time; when done, plunge for a second in cold water to prevent its sticking to the bag. Admirable, and will keep for weeks.

Plain Plum Pudding. — One and a half cupfuls of milk; one cupful of suet, freed from strings, and chopped to powder; four scant cupfuls of sifted flour; one pinch of salt; two thirds of a cupful of molasses; one teaspoonfnl of soda; one cupful and a half of raisins, seeded and dredged; one cupful and a half of currants, picked, washed, and dregded; half a cupful of finely snipped candied orange peel; one teaspoonf ul of ground cloves; one grated nutmeg.

Mix as usual, and boil four hours.

Half-hour Pudding. — Half a pound of beef suet, shredded finely and chopped to powder; half a pound of grated and browned bread crumbs; one tablespoonful of sifted flour; half a cupful of sugar; one nutmeg, grated; three eggs beaten light.

Mix as usual, and, after flouring your hands, form the pudding into large round balls, tie each in a cup, then in a floured cloth; boil half an hour, and serve with wine sauce.

Queen's Pudding. — One and a half cupfuls of white sugar, powdered; three cupfuls of fine dry bread crumbs soaked in sweet cream; five eggs; one tablespoonful of butter; vanilla, or rose water, or bitter-almond seasoning; one quart of fresh, rich milk; one cupful of preserve.

Cream the butter and sugar; beat the yolks light, and stir to a cream; then add the soaked bread crumbs; pour into a buttered pudding-dish, and bake; when the pudding is "set," spread with preserve, and then with a meringue made of the whites of the eggs whipped up with half a cupful of sugar.

Cheap Suet Rolypcly. — One pound of fine white flour; two teaspoonfuls of salt; one teaspoonful of baking-powder; two ounces of sweet beef drippings; two gills of milk; two gills of water; one egg.

Sift flour, salt, and baking-powder together; rub in the drippings, milk, water, and egg; roll out half an inch thick; spread with a quarter of a pound of chopped suet, one pinch of salt, two heaping tablespoonfuls of sugar, and spice or nutmeg to taste; roll up, tie tightly in a floured cloth, and boil steadily for two hours in a large covered pot half-full of water.

Molasses Rolypoly. — Make up as " Suet Kolypoly," using half a pint of molasses instead of the suet.

Currant Rolypoly. — Make up as " Suet Holy poly," using a quarter of a pound of washed and dried currants with the suet.

Shelford Pudding. — Half a pound of suet, freed from shreds, and chopped to powder; one pound of flour, sifted; six eggs well beaten, whites and yolks separately; one ounce of candied lemon peel, chopped fine; one pinch of salt; one pound of raisins, seeded and chopped; one pint of warm milk.

Mix all the ingredients well together, pour into a melon-shape form, cover, and boil six hours.

Plain Suet Pudding. — One coffeecupful of suet, freed from shreds, and chopped to a fine powder; three coffeecupfuls of sifted flour; one coffeecupful of raisins, seeded and chopped; one coffeecupful of molasses; one cupful of sweet milk, warm; half a teaspoonful of soda dissolved in the milk; one teaspoonful of salt.

This pudding should boil from four and a half to five hours. If boiled in a bag, allow very little room for swelling; serve with Edinburgh sauce, which is composed of one cupful of sugar, two thirds of a cupful of butter beaten to a cream, half a pint of brown sherry heated to boiling, and two eggs well beaten; add the eggs to the butter and sugar, then the wine, put the saucepan on the fire, and stir steadily.

Plain Treacle Pudding. — Three quarters of a pound of sifted flour; a quarter of a pound of suet, freed from strings and powdered; half a pound of black treacle or molasses; one egg, well beaten; one teaspoonful of baking-powder; one teaspoonful of ground ginger; four ta blespoonfuls of milk.

Sift the flour into a bowl, add the baking-powder and ginger, mix well, then add the suet, pour the treacle into the middle of the flour, and add the beaten egg and milk; stir all quickly to a smooth, soft paste, put into a greased mould, and cover with a piece of greased paper; set the mould into a pan of boiling water — the water should reach to about an inch from the top of the mould — and watch closely to see that the water does not boil into the pudding.

Poor-Man's Fruit Pudding. — Four ounces of rolled bread crumbs; eight ounces of sifted flour; one teaspoonful of baking-powder; a quarter of a pound of suet; a quarter of a pound of Sultana raisins, seeded and chopped; a quarter of a pound of currants, picked, washed, and dredged; two ounces of citron; the juice and grated rind of a lemon; half a pound of treacle; one egg, well beaten; enough milk to bind all together; a pinch of salt, and a teaspoonful of allspice.

Mix as usual, pour into two buttered moulds, of equal size, and steam or boil each for two hours.

Sir Watkyn Wynnes Pudding. — Four ounces of ground rice; half a pound of suet; half a pound of browned bread crumbs; four yolks and two whites of eggs; four tablespoonfuls of orange marmalade.

Shred the suet into the finest possible strips, and mix it thoroughly with the flour and bread; then add the yolks, which should previously have been beaten very light; then the whites, which must be previously beaten as light as possible; then, drop by drop, the marmalade; then beat all well together, put into a buttered mould which will hold a quart, taking care not to press it too tightly; let it boil four hours; serve with butter sauce.

Farina Pudding. — Put two ounces of Hecker's farina into three quarters of a pint of new milk, and let both boil up together; when done enough, stir in a quarter of a pound of butter, two ounces of loaf sugar, five eggs (omitting the whites of two), the rind of a lemon, grated, a little orange-flower water, and some small slices of citron; beat the yolks and whites separately, adding the whites last of all; when mixed, beat hard and long, then bake in small cups, and serve with sauce.

Iced Almond Pudding a la Russe. — Half a quart of almond milk, well sweetened, and flavored with bitter almond; two tumblerfuls of whipped cream; six leaves of gelatine dissolved previously in water.

Whip the gelatine into the almond milk, and then add the whipped cream, stirring and beating until yon have a smooth mass; then pour into a dome-shaped form which has previously been placed on pounded ice and rock salt; put on the cover of the form; stop the joint (between the cover and the form) with a paste made of flour and water; cover with ice and salt; in an hour's time plunge the form into warm water, dry quickly, and turn out the pudding on a napkin.

Iced Apricot Pudding. — Take some fresh, ripe apricots, peel and stone them, and press through a sieve; sugar well, and add the juice of two oranges, several spoonfuls of almond milk, and seven or eight leaves of dissolved gelatine; strain carefully, then put a little in a cup and place it on the ice to judge of its consistency; if it be of the proper consistency pour into a bowl, put the bowl into a pan filled with ice, and beat hard and long, until the pudding is smooth and light; then pour into a mould and proceed as above.

Iced Peach Pudding. — Proceed as above, omitting the orange juice, and using rich, sweet cream instead of the almond milk; Blanch and pound the peach kernels, and add for flavoring.

Iced Rice Pudding d la Bearnaise. — Blanch half a pound of rice for six or seven minutes; then drain, put into a porcelain-lined saucepan, and cover with milk; cook slowly, and when the rice is tender and the milk absorbed, sweeten it; when the sugar is melted, withdraw the saucepan from the fire, cover it, and let it stand until the rice is cold; then add half a glassful of Maraschino, and a few teaspoonfuls of orange syrup. Pack an ice pudding-mould in ice and salt; when it has stood for ten minutes, fill with alternate layers of rice and preserve; cover, seal, and pack as usual, and leave for an hour.

Iced Rice Pudding d VEspagnole. — Pick about a pound of good rice, wash it carefully, plunge into boiling water, and parboil it; then drain, put into an earthen saucepan, and finish cooking it with milk; when tender take from the fire, and when almost cold sweeten with powdered sugar; add half 'a quart of orange syrup, and a tumblerful of rich cream; pour into a mould packed on ice, and stir for some minutes; then cover, seal, and pack as usual. It will be iced in twenty minutes.

Iced Banana Pudding, or Plombiere du Cavie. — Three cupf uls of vanilla custard, very sweet; fifteen ripe bananas; two cupfuls of whipped cream.

Peel and mash the bananas, and press through a sieve; stir in the custard, strain through a coarse sieve, and proceed as above; when it has been stirred on the ice for some minutes, add the whipped cream, and a wineglassfnl of Maraschino; then cover, seal, and ice.

Charlotte de Frankfort Iced Pudding. — Make a little clear jelly, using for the purpose either Coxe's or Nelson's gelatine; clarify, flavor with bitter almond, and sweeten it well; while the jelly is still warm, rinse an ice pudding-mould with cold water, and pack it on ice and salt; when it is freezing-cold put a layer of jelly on the bottom and sides; it should be an inch thick; then pack in alternate layers of apricot marmalade and of lady-fingers soaked in Maraschino; proceed in this way until the mould is full; cover closely, seal with a paste of flour and water, cover with ice and salt, and leave for'an hour.

Muscovite Iced Pudding. — Take different varieties of preserved fruits, immerse for an instant in boiling water, drain, and cut into dice ; put into a bowl, pour over them a quarter of a tumblerful of cognac, cover, and let them stand for an hour; take six leaves of clarified gelatine, dissolve, and pour into an earthen saucepan; add a quarter of it glassful of orange syrup, half a bottle of champagne, four teaspoonfuls of lemon juice, and the same quantity of syrup of pineapple; stir steadily for ten minutes; then strain into a bowl placed on ice, and beat until light; then add the chopped fruit, beat smooth, and pour into a mould which has been packed in ice for fifteen minutes; cover, seal, and pack as usual; fifteen minutes will ice it thoroughly.

Iced Farina Pudding. — Three wineglassfuls of white wine; three wineglassfuls of water; one grain of salt; Hecker's farina, a little less than half ft pound; half a pound of loaf sugar; the rind, grated, and juice of half a lemon; the whites of eight eggs beaten to the utmost.

Boil the wine and water in a saucepan; when at boiling-point, sift in the farina, a little at a time, boil seven or eight minutes, then add the lemon and sugar, stirring all the time; when well mixed and smooth withdraw from the fire, pour into a bowl, and beat in the whites of eggs; beat again, hard and long, until quite light and smooth, pour into moulds wet with cold water, and packed on ice; close and cover as above, and leave two hours on the ice; then turn out, and serve.

Iced Currant Pudding. — Several handfuls of ripe currants; the juice of two oranges; one cupful of rich, sweet cream; fifteen leaves of clarified gelatine, dissolved; sugar to taste.

Press the currants through a colander, then through a sieve; then add the sugar, orange juice, and gelatine; then taste and add more sugar if necessary, and add the cream, drop by drop, stirring steadily; beat hard and long until very light; pour into moulds wet with cold water, cover, and pack in ice and salt; one hour will suffice.

To Chop Suet. — Cut into small pieces, and remove the membrane; sprinkle with flour, and chop in a cold place to prevent its becoming soft and sticky.

To Clean Currants. — Put them in a squash strainer, and sprinkle thickly with flour; rub them well until they are separated, and the flour, grit, and fine stems have passed through the strainer; then place strainer and currants in a pan of water, and wash thoroughly; lift strainer and currants together, and change the water until clear; drain between towels, but do not harden them by putting them into the oven.

To Stone Raisins. — Pour boiling water over them; let them stand in it five or ten minutes; drain, and rub each raisin between the finger and thumb until the seeds come out clean, then cut or chop if necessary.

SWEET SAUCES FOR PUDDINGS,

ETC.

Poor-Man's Cream Sauce. — One ounce of butter; one ounce of flour; a little spice; half a pint of boiling water; half a pint of milk; two ounces of sugar.

Stir the flour, butter, and spices over the fire; add gradually the boiling milk and water, stirring into the flour and butter until quite smooth; then stir in the sugar, and let it boil up once; then set the saucepan containing it into another of hot water, so that the sauce may be kept hot until you want to use it.

Poor-Man's Apple Sauce. — Two quarts of cooking apples, pared, cored, and sliced; one cupful of water; four ounces of sugar; one ounce of butter.

Stew the apples in the water until soft; then stir in the sugar and butter.

Red Wine Sauce. — Half a cupful of currant jelly; one glassful of claret, or any other red wine; one tablespoonful of butter, melted; three tablespoonfuls of boiling water; half of a dessertspoonful of arrow-root, or corn-starch, wet with cold water.

Stir the arrow-root into the boiling water and beat, stirring constantly until it thickens; add the butter, then set aside until almost cool, when the jelly should be beaten in, a little at a time, to a smooth cream; pour in the wine, stir hard, and heat in a tin vessel set within another of boiling water.

Apple-Jelly Sauce. — Half a cupful of apple jelly; two tablespoonfuls of melted butter; the juice of one lemon, and half of the grated peel; half of a teaspoonful of nutmeg; two glassfuls of wine; one tablespoonful of powdered sugar.

Beat the jelly to a smooth batter, and add gradually the butter (which should have been previously warmed), the lemon, and nutmeg; warm almost to a boil, stirring steadily, beat hard, put in the sugar, and, lastly, the wine; cover closely, and set within a saucepan of boiling water until wanted; stir now and then, and beat up well before pouring out.

Dinah's Charming Sauce. — One small cupful of sifted sugar; half the quantity of butter; one large cupful of boiling milk; one dessertspoonful of ground cinnamon.

Stir the butter and sugar to a cream; then stir in the cinnamon and the boiling milk; stir briskly till smooth; then pour into the sauce boat; may be eaten cold or hot.

Old Humphrey's Aigre-Doux Sauce for Cold Puddings. — Two large cupfuls of sour cream; the juice and finely grated rind of a large lemon ; sugar to taste.

Beat hard and long until the sauce is very light. This is delicious with cold "Brown Betty " — a form of cold farina, corn-starch, blanc-mange, and the like.

Felicias Crime d'Amande Sauce. — Two large cupfuls of sweet cream; two ounces of sweet almonds, blanched, chopped, browned in the oven, and ground; one ounce of bitter almonds, blanched, chopped, browned in the oven, and ground; powdered sugar to taste; one teaspoonful of rose water.

Beat hard and long until the sauce is thoroughly blended and very light. It is a delicious sauce.

Custard Sauce. — One pint of milk; two eggs beaten very light; one cupful of powdered sugar stirred into the eggs; nutmeg to taste; flavoring to taste; half a wineglassful of brandy.

Heat the milk to boiling, add, by degrees, the beaten eggs and sugar, put in the flavoring and nutmeg, and set within a pan of boiling water; stir until it begins to thicken; then take it off, and stir in the brandy gradually; set, until wanted, within a pan of boiling water.

Hot Cream Sauce. — One pint of cream ; four tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar; one teaspoonf ul of extract of bitter almonds or other flavoring; one teaspoonful of grated nutmeg; the whites of two eggs beaten stiff.

Heat the cream slowly d bain-marie; when scalding hot remove from the fire, put in the sugar and nutmeg, stir three or four minutes, and add the whites: mix thoroughly and flavor, setting the vessel containing the sauce in a pan of hot water until the pudding is served.

Dinah's Pudding Sauce, No. 1 ("Every Day"). — One teacupful of sugar; two thirds of a teacupful of butter; four wineglassfuls of white wine; two eggs well beaten, whites and yolks separately; one teaspoonful of sifted flour.

Stir the butter and sugar to 'a cream, then add the eggs and flour, and, lastly, the wine, which must be stirred in boiling hot; serve immediately.

Dinah's Nonpareil Pudding Sauce, No. 2. — Two cupfuls of white powdered sugar, sifted; three quarters of a cupful of fresh butter; one cupful of white wine; one tablespoonful of brandy; one tablespoonful of fine white flour, sifted.

Stir the butter and sugar to a perfect cream; then add gradually the wine, brandy, and flour, stirring steadily all the time; then, and not till then,put the bowl containing the sauce into a kettle of boiling water. Do not stir it, but see that the water boils steadily until the sauce is thoroughly heated through; if properly made it is smooth as cream.

Hard Sauce. — Stir to a cream one cupful of butter; three cupfuls of powdered sugar; when light, beat in the juice of a lemon, and two teaspoonfuls of grated nutmeg. Set in a cold place until wanted.

Brandy Sauce. — Half a cupful of butter; two cupfuls of powdered sugar; one wineglassful of brandy; one teaspoonf ul of mixed cinnamon and mace.

Beehive Sauce. — Make a good hard sauce, according to either of the foregoing receipts; color part of it with cochineal tincture to a bright crimson or pink, and shape into a beehive; put the remainder of the sauce into a small paper funnel, and squeeze the sauce out gently through the small end of the funnel, beginning at the base of the cone, and winding about it to the top, filling the funnel as it is emptied. The effect is very pretty, and may be varied as to color to suit your taste.

Madeira-Wine Sauce. — Yolks of four eggs, whipped very light; one lemon, juice and half the grated peel; one glassful of Madeira or pale sherry; one cupful of sugar; one tablespoonf ul of butter.

Rub the butter and sugar together, add the yolks, lemon, and spices; beat ten minutes, and put in the wine, still stirring hard; set within a saucepan of boiling water, and beat while it heats, but do not let it boil. Serve hot.

Delicious Pudding Sauce. — Half a pint of sweet milk; yolks of two eggs well beaten; one teacupful of pulverized sugar beaten into the whites of the eggs, flavoring to taste; whites of two eggs beaten stiff.

Scald the milk; while still in the saucepan pour in the yolks, and boil till as thick as custard ; take from the fire, and, when cold, add the flavoring and the whites; beat hard and long.

Quick Sauce for Cold Puddings. — One pint of rich fresh cream; some stale macaroons dried in the oven and rolled fine; one teaspoonful of brandy; one teaspoonful of rose water.

Beat the crumbs into the cream, then the rose water, last of all the brandy. This is delicious with claret jelly.

Milk Sauce. — Five tablespoonfuls of boiling milk; half a teaspoonful of arrow-root or corn-starch, wet with cold milk; one teaspoonful of grated nutmeg; one tablespoonf ul of butter; two eggs beaten stiff; one large cupful of sugar.

Cream the butter and sugar, add the eggs, and beat again; add next the corn-starch and spice, then the milk, beating hard ; set within a saucepan of boiling water five minutes, stirring hard. Do not let it boil.

Lemon Sauce. — One large cupful of sugar; half a large cupful of butter; one egg, beaten light; one lemon, all the juice and half the grated peel; one teaspoonful of nutmeg; three tablespoonf uls of boiling water.

Cream the butter and sugar; and beat in the egg whipped light, also the lemon and nutmeg.

Orange or Raisin Wine Sauce. — Half a cupful of butter; two and a half cupfuls of sugar; one lemon, juice and half the grated peel; one glassful of orange brandy or raisin wine; one cupful of boiling water; one dessertspoonful of corn starch, wet in cold milk.

Cream the butter and sugar well; pour the cornstarch into the boiling water, and stir over a close fire until it is well thickened; put all together in a bowl, and beat five minutes before returning it to the saucepan. Heat once, almost to boiling-point, add the wine, and serve.

SAUCES FOR MEAT AND FISH.

Browning for Gravies and Sauces, No. 1. — Put four ounces of lump sugar, a gill of water, and half an ounce of the finest butter into a small porcelain saucepan, and set it over a gentle fire; stir it with a wooden spoon until it is a bright brown, then add half a pint of water, boil, skim, and, when cold, bottle and cork it close.

Browning for Gravy, No. 2. — Four ounces of pounded loaf sugar; one ounce of best butter; one third of a pint of port wine; three spoonfuls of mushroom catsup; six cloves; one onion chopped fine; grated rind of half a lemon; salt and allspice to taste.

Put the butter and sugar together into a frying-pan over a clear fire ; stir it constantly; when it froths and the sugar dissolves, hold it higher; when it becomes a deep brown, pour in by degrees the other ingredients in the above order; boil all slowly for ten minutes, skim, strain, and, when cold, bottle.

On the Use of Wine in Sauces. — It may be laid down as an invariable rule that, in making wine sauces, it is safe to use at first only half the quantity of wine indicated in the receipt, adding the remainder just in time to boil up once. In this way the flavor of the sauce is better preserved.

Browned Flour for Sauces. — Sift the flour, spread it on a tin plate on the stove, and stir continually until it begins to brown all through.

Mushroom Sauce. — One teacupful of young mushrooms; four tablespoonfuls of melted butter; one teacupful of cream; one teaspoonful of corn flour; nutmeg, mace, and salt to taste, wet in cold milk.

Stew the mushrooms in enough water to cover them until tender; drain, add the cream, butter, and seasoning, and stew over a clear fire until it begins to thicken; add the flour, boil up, and serve in a sauceboat with boiled poultry, game, etc.

Asparagus Sauce. — Twelve heads of asparagus; two teacupfuls of drawn butter; two eggs; the juice of half a lemon; salt and white pepper.

Boil the tender heads in a little salt and water; drain and chop them ; have ready the drawn butter boiling hot, with two raw eggs beaten in; add the asparagus heads and season, putting in the lemon juice last; pour into a hot sauceboat, and serve. It is excellent with boiled poultry, stewed fillet of veal, or boiled mutton.

Anchovy Sauce. — Skin and bone the anchovies, and simmer in enough cold water to cover them; strain the liquor into a teacupful of drawn butter, add a wineglassful of pale sherry, beat gradually to a boil, and stew five minutes longer. Serve with boiled fish.

Oyster Sauce. — One pint of oysters; half a lemon, juice only; two tablespoonfuls of butter; one teaspoonful of flour, mixed with cold water; one teacupful of milk or cream; cayenne and nutmeg to taste.

Stew the oysters in their own liquor five minutes, and add the cream; when this boils, strain the liquor and return to the saucepan; thicken with the flour, stir well, then add the butter and salt, and season to taste; boil one minute, add the lemon juice, stir well, and dish.

For boiled fish and boiled poultry.

Mint Sauce for Roast Lamb. — Two tablespoonfuls of green mint chopped fine; one tablespoonful of powdered sugar; half a teacupf ul of cider or wine vinegar.

Put the sugar and vinegar into a sauceboat, and stir in the mint. Let it stand fifteen minutes before sending it to table.

Sauce Espagnole (Brown Sauce). — Butter the bottom of the saucepan ; put in pieces of cold chicken, game, ham, veal, etc., in fact whatever cold meats you have; add an onion, a clove, and a carrot cut in pieces; place the saucepan, covered, on a slow fire to let the meat steam, and until the sauce begins to color; add one or two spoonfuls of flour, mix it well, moisten with hot bouillon so that the sauce will be the proper consistency; add a soup bunch, and salt; let it simmer slowly four hours on the back of the stove; then skim off the grease; press it through a sieve, and keep it on hand for adding to all other sauces.

Sauce Veloute (White Sauce). — Put in a saucepan a little butter, carrots, onions, slices of lean ham, and scraps of cold meat, or fowls — in fact a whole chicken, if you wish — a soup bunch, a clove of garlic (for a few moments), a quart of water; cut up the chicken, and let it steam on a good fire; the sauce being reduced, prick the pieces of chicken and meat to let the juice escape; fill the saucepan with cold water; season with salt, one or two cloves of garlic, and twelve or fifteen mushrooms, without vinegar; skim it well when it comes to a boil, and let it simmer four hours; strain it then into a saucepan; the moment it begins to boil add some roux blanc with one hand, and stir with the other hand, until you make the sauce the thickness desired; let it simmer slowly one hour more on the back of the stove; then skim, strain, and keep for further use.

Sauce AUemande. — Pour a little of the sauce veloute in a saucepan in which you have already beaten up four or five yolks of eggs, with a little butter, and a pinch of grated nutmeg; put it on the fire for a moment, stirring it all the time, that the eggs may be well cooked and the sauce well mixed. This is a good sauce for vegetables, or fish.

Sauce Supreme. — Make a little consomme of chicken, with all the trimmings; strain and clarify it; make a little roux Mane, moisten it with this consomme, and reduce it to the proper consistency; at the moment of serving, add the juice of a good lemon, and a piece of butter; stir your sauce well with a wooden spoon; if you like, add a little chopped parsley which has been well washed.

Egg Sauce. — Yolks of three hard-boiled eggs chopped fine; a good teacupful of drawn butter; salt to taste.

Stir the chopped yolks of the eggs into the hot drawn butter, and add, for fowls, a little minced parsley ; for fish, some chopped capers, pickles, or nasturtium seed; for boiled beef, a shallot minced fine.

Bechamel Sauce. — Put nine ounces of sifted white flour into an earthen dish; add three glasses of cold milk, stirring vigorously; put it into a saucepan, and when it begins to thicken, withdraw it from the pan, beat smooth, and add one pint of boiled milk, two small onions minced fine, a bunch of parsley, a little salt, some whole peppercorns, and, lastly, four to five ounces of raw ham, chopped fine; let it come to a boil, then draw to the back of the stove, and simmer twenty minutes, stirring often; then strain carefully.

Bread Sauce, No. 1. — Slice some white bread very thin, and remove the crust; boil it in milk with a small onion, and some whole white pepper; take out the onion, rub the sauce through a coarse sieve, warm it up again, and stir in a small piece of fresh butter before serving. A little cream is an improvement, and this, too, should be stirred in before serving.

Bread Sauce, No. 2. — Roll some stale bread crumbs, very fine, brown them thoroughly, and put aside; put equal quantities of milk and cream in a casserole, together with a small onion and some peppercorns; when the onion is boiled, take it out, strain the sauce through a sieve, and replace it on the fire with a piece of fresh butter; add now, a little at a time, the brown bread crumbs, stirring all the time, and, when all are put in, heat the sauce for a moment, put into a hot sauceboat, and serve. It is very good.

Beurre de Montpellier. — Blanch in boiling water a large handful of sweet herbs, such as chives, chervil, tarragon, parsley, etc., drain, pound in a mortar to a fine paste, together with four anchovies, boned and skinned, the yolks of eight hard-boiled eggs, two or three cucumbers, a soup con of garlic, capers, a little salt, pepper, and grated nutmeg, and enough fine, fresh butter to work all into a smooth, hard paste; add also some lemon juice and a little olive-oil; color pale olive green with essence of spinach, and put in a cool place. Use to garnish cold dishes.

Beurre aV&revisses (Crabs or Shrimp). — Wash and cook the fish with salt and water; pound the shells (which should be bright pink or red in color) and the flesh together in a mortar; when you have reduced them to a smooth paste, mix them with an equal quantity of the finest fresh butter; work smooth in the mortar, then put on the fire with a little water, and boil for half an hour; put some clear cold water in the bottom of a jar or pan, spread over a coarse muslin, and pour on the butter; it will filter through the muslin, and must be pressed through if necessary; it will float on the water below, from which you must skim it, working it again into shape, and using it for flavoring sauces, etc.

Beurre d'Ail, or Garlic Butter. — Pound two large cloves of garlic to a smooth paste, then work in a piece of butter the size of an egg. This also may be used, in very small quantities, to flavor sauces.

Anchovy Butter. — Bone and skin two anchovies, pound to a paste, and mix with an equal quantity of fresh butter.

Melted Butter, d la Francaise, for Salmon. — Melt in a saucepan four to five ounces of butter, and add, little by little, an equal quantity of the finest sifted flour, stirring steadily until the sauce is smooth as cream; then add two glasses of the water in which the salmon was boiled; this water must be strained, and cool before using it; allow the sauce just to come to a boil; then take the saucepan from the fire, and add the yolks of two eggs, and four and a half ounces of melted butter, never ceasing to stir it for an instant; finish with the juice of a lemon, and a pinch of roasted powdered parsley.

Butter Browned. — Put a lump of butter in a fryingpan, and toss and stir it over a clear fire until it browns; then dredge with browned flour, and stir into a thick batter until it begins to boil.

Maitre d' Hotel Sauce. — One teacupful of melted butter, prepared as for Dutch sauce; one teaspoonful of minced parsley; juice of one lemon; cayenne and salt to taste.

Draw the butter; stir in the roasted parsley; add the lemon juice; then the pepper and salt; beat hard with an egg whip; return to the pan, and boil up once.

Old-fashioned Drawn Butter, No. 1. — Two teaspoonf uls of sifted flour; one and a half ounces of butter; one teacupful of water or milk; salt to taste.

Put the flour and salt in a bowl, and add the milk, a little at a time, working it as smooth as velvet; put into a saucepan, and beat in a vessel of boiling water; stir steadily, and when it has boiled a minute or more add the butter by degrees, stirring until entirely melted and quite smooth; boil one minute.

Old-fashioned Drawn Butter, No. 2. — One and a half teaspoonfuls of flour wet to a paste with cold water; two ounces of butter; one small teacupful of hot water.

Mix and cook as above.

Onion Sauce. — Four white onions; one teacupful of hot milk, or, better still, cream; one teacupful of drawn butter; salt and pepper to taste.

Peel the onions, boil tender, drain, press, and mince fine; have ready the hot milk in a saucepan, stir in the onions, then the butter, salt, and pepper; boil up once, and serve.

Celery Sauce. — Two large heads of celery; one teacupful of white bouillon or stock; one teacupful of cream or milk; salt and nutmeg to taste; heaping tablespoonful of flour, and the same of butter.

Boil the celery in salted water until tender, drain, and chop into small bits; thicken the stock with the flour; add the butter, seasoning, and milk; stir or beat until smooth; put in the celery; heat almost to boiling, stirring steadily; serve in a sauce-tureen.

Dutch Sauce. — Put one and a half tablespoonfuls of vinegar in a saucepan, and reduce it on the fire to one third; add two ounces of butter, and the yolk of one egg; place the saucepan on a slow fire, stir the contents continually with a silver or wooden spoon, and as fast as the butter melts add more, until half a pound is used; if the sauce becomes too thick at any time during the process, add a tablespoonful of cold water, and continue stirring; then put in pepper and salt to taste, and take great care not to let the sauce boil; when it is made, and that is when the butter is all consumed, and the sauce is of the proper thickness, put the saucepan containing it into another filled with warm (not boiling) water until the time of serving.

Cold Sauce for Fish. — Blanch and pound parsley, chervil, tarragon, pimpernel, and chives; when reduced to a smooth paste press through a sieve, and add the yolks of two hard-boiled eggs rubbed smooth; mix well, and add, drop by drop, four spoonfuls of oil, two of vinegar, and two of made mustard; serve in a sauceboat.

Cold Ravigote. — Take watercresses, tarragon, chives, chervil, pimpernel, shallots, a clove (tiny) of garlic, the tender leaves of celery, basil, capers, and a few anchovies; chop fine, then rub to a paste; add the yolk of a raw egg, a little oil, salt, and pepper, and, lastly, a little vinegar; work to a smooth sauce; you may add mustard if you wish a very piquant ravigote.

Indian or Kari Sauce. — Put in a saucepan a lump of butter the size of an egg; a coffeespoonful of cayenne pepper mixed with saffron (or kari); a soupcon of grated nutmeg; two teaspoonfuls of flour; salt to taste; add some strong bouillon; boil up once; strain; stir in a little melted butter, and serve.

Hot Mayonnaise Sauce for Boiled Salmon. — For a sauceboatful, take the yolks of three eggs, salt to taste, and a sufficient quantity of the finest oil of Lucca and of vinegar to work it smooth; when of the proper consistency, put it into a small earthenware casserole, and stir constantly until it begins to disintegrate; then take it quickly from the fire, and beat it smooth, adding a few drops of cold water; then return to the fire and heat, stirring steadily; do not allow it to boil; at the last moment, after you have taken it from the fire, add a teaspoonful of mustard moistened with vinegar, and a pinch of roasted powdered parsley.

Sauce Poivrade. — Chop fine a large onion and four shallots; put them into a saucepan with some lean, raw ham, a little butter, a clove of garlic, a handful of chopped mushrooms, some sprigs of parsley, laurel, and thyme, three or four peppercorns, and some spices; cook all together for eight minutes; then add a glassful of good vinegar; cook again until the vinegar is reduced to one half; add two glassfuls of Sauce Espagnole; let all come to a boil; then place the saucepan where its contents can only simmer; a quarter of an hour afterwards skim it; add cayenne pepper to taste, and serve.

Sauce Ravigote. — Put into a saucepan two or three teaspoonfuls of chopped shallots, and six tablespoonfuls of vinegar; cook until the liquid is reduced to one half ; then add six tablespoonfuls of white sauce, rather thick; let all boil for a few seconds; then withdraw the saucepan from the fire, and mix with the sauce, drop by drop, the quarter of a tumblerful of oil of Lucca, stirring steadily one way; when smooth add a teaspoonful of made mustard, and a pinch each of tarragon and pimpernel chopped fine.

Sauce Verte d la Venitienne. — Make a white sauce as usual, using fish stock instead of other stock, and also a glass of white wine; pound in a mortar a handful of fresh parsley, and an equal quantity of chives blanched; add two pickled gherkins chopped fine; two teaspoonfuls of capers; four anchovies boned and pounded to a pulp; bind with a little melted butter, pass through a sieve, and mix with the sauce at the last moment.

Sauce Hollandaise. — Use for this sauce only the freshest butter and eggs; put one and a half tablespoonfuls of vinegar into a saucepan, with a pinch of salt, and a still smaller pinch of white pepper; reduce this on the fire to one third; withdraw the sauce from the fire; add two tablespoonfuls of cold water, and the yolks of two eggs, from which you have carefully removed every particle of white; replace the saucepan on a slow fire, and stir with a wooden spoon, until the eggs thicken, then remove from the fire, add two ounces of butter, stir till it dissolves; then replace on the fire for one minute, and add two ounces of butter; stir until it dissolves, then remove from the fire, and stir in two more ounces of butter; proceed in this order, stirring steadily, until you have used up all the butter; when you add butter for the third time put in also a tablespoouful of cold water; the quantity of butter used should be half a pound; stir smoothly and unceasingly; should the sauce be too thick, add another tablespoonful of cold water. Under no circumstances be induced to thicken this sauce with flour. The principle of Hollandaise sauce is to be composed solely of eggs and butter. "To my mind Sauce Hollandaise is the king of sauces" (Gouffe").

Roux (Gouffe"). — Rouse is made with flour and butter; it should be cooked on a very slow fire until it becomes pale brown in color.

Put the saucepan containing the roux on the fire, moisten with a little water, stir continually with a wooden spoon, and cook over a quick fire until it begins to boil; then set it back on the stove, simmer for an hour, strain, and put into an earthen jar.

Green Mayonnaise. — Make a mayonnaise as usual, but work into it gradually a tableapoonful of powdered herbs, as for Sauce Ravigote and a few drops of essence of spinach.

Sorrel Sauce. — Pick from the stalks and wash carefully two handfuls of sorrel, and drain, then chop it somewhat coarsely; melt in a saucepan a pat of butter, mix with it a small tablespoonful of flour; add the sorrel, and a halfpint of cream, a little stock, salt, and grated nutmeg; let it come to a boil, and it is ready.

Parsley-and-Lemon Sauce. — Wash a handful of parsley, and mince it finely with the pulp and grated rind of a lemon; melt a pat of butter in a saucepan, mix with it a tablespoonful of flour, add the parsley and lemon, enough stock to make a sauce, a little pounded mace, and a few capers; stir over the fire, and when partly cooked withdraw from the fire a moment, and add the yolks of two eggs beaten up; heat to a boil, salt, dish, and serve.

Shrimp Sauce. — Take half a pint of boiled shrimps, pick out the meat from the tails, pound the rest in a mortar with the juice of half a lemon and a piece of butter, and pass it through a sieve; make a pint of melted butter, put the meat from the tails into it, add a dust of cayenne, and when the sauce boils stir into it the shrimp butter which has come through the sieve, with a tablespoonful of cream. Crab and lobster sauce can be made in the same way.

Sardine Sauce. — Skin, bone, and tail twelve sardines, and pull them into very small pieces; chop up with them a shallot, a small quantity of parsley, and the grated rind of half a large lemon; melt in a saucepan a pat of butter; mix with it a small tablespoonful of browned flour; when it has taken color add the mince with enough stock to make good sauce; let it boil, add salt to taste, and a soupcon of grated nutmeg, and serve.

Tartare Sauce. — Put the yolks of four eggs into a plate, then salt and mustard to taste, and a tiny pinch of white sugar; work in, drop by drop, the oil, which should be of the finest quality; or use thick, fresh cream instead of oil; then work in the tarragon vinegar, add white pepper, a soupcon of cayenne, a button onion minced and mashed fine, and a little pickled cucumber cut fine; rub the dish in which it is served with garlic.

Italian Sauce. — Mince a couple of shallots finely, and fry them in a little salad oil to a pale straw color; add two or three mushrooms and a little parsley, both finely minced; moisten with enough stock and white wine, in equal parts, to make the sauce; put in, tied up together, some sweet herbs and a bay leaf, add pepper and salt to taste, and let the sauce boil for half an hour; remove the herbs and bay leaf, melt a large piece of butter in a saucepan, add a little flour to it, stir well, and then add the sauce.

White Lemon Sauce for Boiled Fowls. — Put the peel of a fresh lemon into one pint of rich, sweet cream, together with a sprig of lemon thyme and ten white peppercorns; simmer gently until the cream tastes of the lemon; then strain, and thicken it with a quarter of a pound of butter and one tablespoonful of sifted flour; allow it to boil up once, and pour the juice of one lemon into it, stirring it well; salt to taste.

Sauce for Hot or Cold Roast Beef. — Grate some horseradish very fine, and add a little made mustard, as much powdered white sugar, and four large tablespoonfuls of sugar, also a pinch of salt.

Yarmouth Fish Sauce. — One pint of port wine; one gill of mountain wine; half a pint of fine walnut catsup; one gill of walnut pickle with the liquor; the juice and the grated rind of a large lemon; four red-pepper pods; three ounces of grated horseradish; three blades of mace; two teaspoonfuls of made mustard; two teaspoonfuls of sifted sugar.

Put all the ingredients into a porcelain-lined saucepan, stir steadily, and simmer gently till all rawness of taste disappears; then withdraw from the fire, allow it to cool, and put into small, wide-necked bottles; cork tightly.

Apple Sauce. — Pare, core, and slice some ripe, tart apples; stew in water enough to cover them until they break to pieces; add brown sugar to taste, and a pinch of nutmeg; beat to a smooth pulp, and stir in a good lump of butter.

Cranberry Sauce. — Wash and pick a quart of ripe cranberries, and put into a saucepan with a teacupful of water; stew slowly, stirring often, until they are as thick as marmalade; they require at least an hour and a half to cook; when you take them from the fire, sweeten abundantly with white sugar; then pulp through a coarse mosquito-net into a mould wet with cold water.

Peach Sauce (Old Marie's). — Soak a quart of dried peaches in water four hours; wash them carefully, changing the water two or three times; drain and put into a stewpan with just water enough to cover them; stew till they break to pieces, putting in, also, a little dried orange peel for flavoring; rub to a soft pulp, sweeten to taste with white sugar, and just before taking from the fire stir in a tablespoonf ul of cornstarch moistened with cold water.

CUSTARDS, CREAMS, JELLIES, AND BLANC-MANGES.

RULES FOR MAKING CUSTARD.

1. Always boil custard by bain-marie — that is, by putting the vessel containing the custard inside of another partly filled with hot water, taking care that the water in the outer vessel is not deep enough to float the custard-kettle, or to boil over into it.

2. Do not let the milk quite boil before adding the yolks; take the scalding milk from the fire and beat it gradually into the yolks, then return to the fire and boil gently until it thickens, stirring constantly. Allow ten or fifteen minutes for thickening a quart.

3. Allow five eggs to a quart of milk, and a tablespoonful of sugar to each egg. For a very plain custard allow four tablespoonfuls of sugar to the quart, and an egg for each cupful of milk. Custards, creams, and trifles that are to be frozen should have one third more sugar. "Floating Island" is made like plain custard,reserving, however, all the whites for the meringue. Proceed according to the foregoing receipt, taking care that the meringue is whipped up with colored fruit jelly.

Plain Custard. — One quart of milk; the yolks and whites of five eggs; six tablespoonfuls of sugar; flavoring to taste.

Heat the milk almost to boiling, beat the yolks light, and stir in the sugar; add the scalding milk to the eggs, in the manner directed above, stir in next the five whites whipped very stiff, return to the fire, and stir until thick, but be careful not to let it break; flavor, stir, and pour into cups. If you wish to make this more effective, you may whip the whites of two- eggs to a meringue, with a heaping tablespoonful of powdered sugar, and drop a little of this on the top of each cup.

Pistachio Custard. — Make a custard as usual, and add one tenth of a pound of pistachio nuts, which should be prepared as follows: Scald them in boiling water, and then peel them and pound them to a smooth paste in a mortar. This paste should be added to the custard before it is put on the fire, and just before taking it from the fire add enough essence of spinach to give it a fine green color.

German Custard. — Make a custard as usual, adding half an ounce of sweet almonds, blanched, roasted, and pounded to a paste, and half an ounce of pinenuts or peanuts, blanched, roasted, and pounded; also a small quantity of candied citron cut into the thinnest possible slips; cook the custard as usual, and set it on the ice for some hours before using.

Polish Custard. — Take six Naples biscuits, or small sponge cakes; dry them in the oven, then crumble them fine, and roll with the rolling-pin until they are reduced to a powder; moisten them with half a glassful of fresh cream, then add the yolks of eight eggs well beaten, and sweeten to taste with powdered sugar, sifted, and lastly four glassfuls of fresh cream, and a few drops of essence of bitter almond.

Cook d bain-marie, stirring continually with a wooden or silver spoon until the cream thickens, but do not let it boil; when of the proper consistency remove the casserole from the fire, pour the cream into a dish, and set it aside to cool; when quite-cold, sift some fine sugar on the top of the custard, taking care to do so very evenly, so that the custard is, as it were, iced; then burn this sugar by passing a red-hot iron spatula very lightly over it, without touching the custard; if properly done, the sugar forms a brown, glazed crust on top of the custard. The effect is admirable.

Lemon Creams. — Pare four lemons very thinly, and throw into twelve tablespoonfuls of water; squeeze juice over eight ounces of finely powdered sugar; well beat the yolks of ten eggs, add peel, water, and juice gradually, and strain through muslin into a stewpan.

Stir it one way over a gentle fire until it becomes pretty thick, but do not let it boil. Serve cold in custard cups.

Nesselrode Cream d la Russe. — One pint of syrup of loaf sugar, flavored with vanilla; fifty fine large chestnuts, boiled, peeled, pounded, and pressed through a sieve; one quart of fresh cream; the yolks of twelve eggs well beaten.

Moisten the strained chestnuts with the syrup, adding little by little the cream and the beaten yolks; when all these ingredients are smoothly mixed together, cook d bain-marie, stirring continually until the cream begins to thicken; add then a piece of candied citron, sliced fine, one tenth of a pound of Sultana raisins, seeded and dredged, and a glassful of Maraschino; add also, and lastly, a quart of whipped cream, and the yolks of three eggs well beaten; stir continually until the cream is as-smooth as velvet, and very thick; then pour into a dish, and set on the ice for some hours before serving.

Strawberry Cream. — Press through a sieve five ounces of ripe strawberries; put the pulp in a casserole with five ounces of sifted sugar, one-quarter ounce of powdered gum arabic, and a pint of good, fresh cream.

Mix all the ingredients smoothly together, then put the casserole on the tire, stirring continually with a wooden spoon until cooked. This cream may be allowed to boil, and is, indeed, better if allowed to boil for five minutes. Eat ice-cold.

Peach Cream. — is made in exactly the same way, omitting the gum arabic, and using enough cream to prevent the mixture from being too thick.

Whipped Cream with Chestnuts. — Choose large, fine chestnuts, boil until tender, then drain, peel (removing outer and inner skin), and press through a colander; arrange the light, feathery mass thus obtained in a pile in the centre of a round dish, and pour round it some whipped cream, sweetened and flavored with bitter almonds.

Caramel Cream. — Make a custard as usual, using burned sugar instead of white sugar; sweeten to taste.

It is impossible to measure the sugar otherwise, as burned sugar has less sweetening power than ordinary sugar. The custard so made should be of a delicate brown color. It is delicious.

Solid Snow or Rahm Sultz. — Bring to the boiling-point one quart of fresh, rich cream or milk; pour this quickly over two spoonfuls of corn-flour, blended with some cold cream; sweeten to taste, and allow it to boil gently, stirring for two or three minutes; add quickly the whites of six eggs, beaten to a stiff froth; do not allow it to boil up more than once after adding the egg; flavor with lemon, vanilla, bitter almond, ratifia, or grated lemon peel; lay the snow thus formed quickly in rocky heaps on silver or glass dishes, or in shapes. Iced, it will turn out well.

Rose Cream. — Flavor one pint and a half of milk with essence of rose, sugar to taste; beat up the yolks of eight eggs, pour the flavored milk on them, and keep on stirring in bain-marie until the custard thickens; melt nine sheets of best French gelatine in a little milk, and add this to the custard, together with half a pint of whipped cream, colored a deep pink with cochineal; pour into a mould and set on ice. Eat cold.

Fried Cream. — Half a pound of butter; four ounces of flour; half a pound of sugar; one quart of sweet, rich milk or cream; the yolks of four eggs.

Melt the butter in a saucepan, stir in the flour, add the milk, stirring always with a wooden spoon; set it on the fire twenty minutes, stirring all the time; add a little vanilla, and when you take it off the fire stir in the yolks of four eggs; grease a dish, and pour the cream in it, and let it cool; cut in little squares, dip it in beaten egg, sprinkle with powdered bread crumbs, and fry it in a saucepan of boiling olive-oil; drain on brown paper, sprinkle with powdered sugar, and serve.

Bavarian Cream. — One quart of sweet cream; yolks only of four eggs; half an ounce of gelatine or isinglass; one small cupful of sugar; two teaspoonfuls of vanilla, bitter-almond extract or other flavoring.

Soak the gelatine, in enough cold water to cover it, for one hour; drain, and stir into a pint of the cream made boiling hot; beat the yolks smooth with the sugar, and add the boiling mixture, beating in a little at a time; heat again until the mixture begins to thicken, then remove it from the fire; flavor it, and stir in the other pint of cream, which should previously have been whipped to a stiff froth; beat in this, a spoonful at a time, until it is of the consistency of a sponge-cake batter; dip a mould in cold water, pour in the mixture, and set on ice to form.

Dutch Cream. — Six tablespoonfuls of sifted sugar; six tablespoonfuls of water; six tablespoonfuls of thin vin ordinaire or other red wine; six whole eggs well beaten; juice and grated rind of one lemon.

Beat all well together, cook d bain-marie, and serve icecold.

Spanish Cream. — One quart of milk; yolks of three eggs; one small cupful of sugar, sifted; half a box of gelatine; bitter-almond flavoring to taste.

Soak the gelatine an hour in the milk, put on the fire, and stir well as it warms; beat the yolks very light with the sugar, add to the scalding milk, and heat to the boilingpoint, stirring all the time; strain through thin muslin: pour into moulds wet with cold water.

Almond Cream. — A quarter of a pound of almonds, blanched, pounded to a paste in a mortar, and moistened with two tablespoonfuls of rose water; yolks of three eggs, and whites of four (two for meringue); four tablespoonfuls of sifted sugar, heaping.

Scald the milk, add the beaten yolks, the sugar,, the almond paste, and whites of two eggs; boil, stirring constantly until it thickens; stir up well when almost cold, and pour into cups, putting on each cup a meringue made of the whites of two eggs, and two tablespoonfuls of powdered sugar, flavored with bitter almond.

Tapioca Cream Custard. — Three eggs; one pint of cold water; one quart of milk; five dessertspoonfuls of tapioca; one heaping cupful of sugar; a pinch of salt; flavoring to taste.

Soak the tapioca in water five hours; let the milk come to a boil, add the tapioca, the water in which it was boiled, and a good pinch of salt; stir until boiling hot, and add gradually to the beaten yolks and sugar; boil again (stirring constantly) for five minutes; pour into a bowl, and stir gently into the mixture the whites of the eggs, beaten to a stiff froth; flavor, stir, and set on the ice.

Swiss Cream. — Boil a pint of thick cream with a little lemon peel, finely grated; when quite cool add the juice of two lemons, and sugar to taste; pour over a quarter of a pound of macaroons, soaked in sherry, brandy, or red wine.

Velvet Cream. — Put into a pan one ounce of isinglass; half a pint of sherry, with the juice of one lemon, and half the rind, finely grated.

Let all boil together until the isinglass is dissolved; strain through a piece of muslin into a pint and a half of cream, and stir altogether one way, until nearly cold; then pour into moulds which have been previously wet with cold water.

Orange Fool. — Mix the juice of three Seville oranges with three whole eggs well beaten; half a pint of cream, and cinnamon, nutmeg, and finely sifted sugar to taste.

Set this over a slow fire, and stir one way until it becomes of the consistency of melted butter. Serve ice-cold.

Gooseberry Fool. — One quart of ripe gooseberries; one large tablespoonful of butter; one cupful of sugar, sifted; yolks of four eggs, whipped to the utmost; meringue of whites, and three tablespoonfuls of sugar.

Stew the gooseberries in just enough water to cover them ; when soft and broken, rub through a sieve to remove skins and seeds; while boiling hot, whip in the butter, sugar, and yolks of the eggs; pour into custard cups, drop the meringue on top, and set on ice.

Currant Fool. — is made as above, omitting the butter.

Flummery. — Dissolve half an ounce of gelatine in one pint of water; add one pint of sherry; yolks of three eggs, and sugar to taste.

Stir over the fire until the rawness of the egg is gone; when nearly cold, add a little lemon juice.

Lemon Snow. — Dissolve half an ounce of gelatine in one pint of water; add one pint of lemon juice, sugar to taste, and the whites of four eggs, beaten to their utmost capacity.

Stir over the fire a moment or two, then, when well amalgamated, withdraw from the fire, beat hard, and pour into moulds wet with cold water.

Frumety. — Boil a quarter of a pint of wheat for three or four hours; add one quart of milk, with two spoonfuls of flour mixed with it, two eggs, three parts of a small teacupful of raisins and currants (both washed, seeded, chopped and dredg -d), a little lemon peel and cinnamon.

Boil for a quarter of an hour, and serve.

Cream Meringues. — Whites of four eggs, whipped stiff, with one pound of powdered sugar; vanilla flavoring.

Line the bottom of your baking-pan with stiff white paper, buttered on both sides; place on this oval tin rings (buttered) the size you want your meringues; when the meringue is very stiff, drop into the rings, which should be very narrow, so as just to keep the foundation of the meringue in shape; have them half an inch apart; do not shut the oven door closely, but leave a space through which you can watch them; when they are a light yellowbrown, take them out and cool quickly; slip a thin-bladed knife under each, scoop out the soft inside and fill with whipped cream.

Apple Trifle. — Peel, core, and quarter some good tart apples of nice flavor, and stew them with a strip of orange and a strip of quince peel, sufficient water to cover the bottom of the stewpan, and sugar in the proportion of half a pound to one pound of fruit; when cooked press the pulp through a sieve; and when cold, dish, and cover with one pint of whipped cream, flavored with lemon peel.

Quince Trifle. — Proceed exactly as for "Apple Trifle."

Pineapple Trifle. — For this take a tin of preserved pine, and pound the fruit to a paste, with loaf sugar to taste; add the juice, press the whole through a sieve, arrange in a trifle dish, and cover with whipped cream as before.

Apricot Trifle. — Use tinned or preserved apricots, and proceed as above, flavoring the cream with bitter almond.

Peach Trifle. — This is best made of fresh peaches, peeled, cored, and cut in quarters; they should be well sugared, arranged in a trifle dish with a few of their own blanched kernels among them, then heaped with whipped cream, as above; the cream should not be flavored; this trifle should be set on the ice for at least an hour before serving; home-made sponge cake should be served with it.

Orange Trifle. — Peel the outside rind very thin from a dozen oranges, and put to steep in a wide-mouthed bottle; cover it with good cognac, and let it stand twenty-four hours; skin and seed the oranges, and reduce to a pulp; press this through a sieve, sugar to taste, arrange in a dish, and heap with whipped cream flavored with the orange brandy; ice two hours before serving.

Grape Trifle. — Take two pounds of nicely flavored grapes, crush, sugar to taste, and let them stand two hours; pulp through a sieve fine enough to keep back the stones, put into a trifle dish, and cover with whipped cream flavored with curacoa; ice before serving.

Raspberry Trifle. — Use fresh raspberries, and proceed as with peaches; ice, of course.

Coffee Blanc-mange. — One quart of sweet, rich cream; one ounce of Cooper's gelatine, soaked in a cup of milk one hour; four tablespoonfuls of very strong coffee; three eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately; three quarters of a cup of sugar, or sugar to taste.

Heat the milk to boiling, pour in the gelatine and milk, and stir until dissolved, add the sugar to the beaten yolks, and stir until smooth, then beat in the coffee, and add the scalding milk very gradually, stirring all the time; return to the inner saucepan (all blanc-mange should be cooked d bain-marie) and heat gently, stirring until it almost boils; remove from the fire, turn into a bowl, and whip in lightly and briskly the beaten whites; pour into moulds wet with cold water.

Chocolate Blanc-mange. — Proceed as above, substituting milk for cream, and chocolate for coffee.

Almond Blanc-mange. — One quart of milk; one ounce of Cooper's gelatine soaked in boiling milk for an hour; three quarters of a cup of sugar; three ounces of almonds, blanched and pounded in a mortar with one tablespoonful of rose water; there must be at least four bitter almondsHeat the milk to boiling, then add the soaked gelatine and the almond paste, and stir all together ten minutes before putting in the sugar; when the gelatine has dissolved, strain the blanc-mange through a thin muslin bag, pressing it hard; turn into moulds wet with cold water, and set in a cold place.

Ribbon Blanc-mange. — Make according to the foregoing receipt, and, after straining, divide into five portions, coloring one green with essence of spinach, one pink with cochineal, one yellow with yolk of egg, and one brown with chocolate; leave the fifth uncolored; when quite cold pour into a mould the pink first, then the green, then the white, then the yellow, and lastly the chocolate; set in a cold place.

Farina Blanc-mange. — One quart "of rich milk; three eggs, well beaten, whites and yolks separately; four tablespoonfuls of farina wet with cold water; one cupful of sugar; flavoring to taste; one saltspoonful of salt.

Heat the milk to boiling, stir in the farina and salt, and boil fifteen minutes before adding the yolks beaten with the sugar; boil two minutes longer, stirring steadily; remove from the fire, beat in the whites, then the flavoring; pour into moulds, and set away to cool; eat with sugar and cream; the eggs and flavoring may be omitted.

Corn-starch Blancmange. — Is made as above, but only boiled five minutes before adding the yolks.

Tapioca Blanc-mange. — One pint of rich, fresh milk; three quarters of a cupful of sugar; half a pound of tapioca soaked in cold water four hours; two teaspoonfuls of bitter almonds or other flavoring; a pinch of salt.

Heat the milk, and stir in the soaked tapioca; when it has dissolved, add the sugar; boil slowly fifteen minutes, stirring all the time; take off the fire, and beat well until nearly cold; flavor and pour into moulds.

Sago Blanc-mange. — Make as above.

Arrow-root Blanc-mange. — Three cupfuls of new milk; two and a half tablespoonfuls of arrow-root wet with cold milk; half a cupful of sugar; flavoring to taste, and a little white wine.

Mix the arrow-root to a smooth batter, with one cupful of the milk; heat the rest to boiling; add the arrow-root, stirring constantly; when it begins to thicken put in the sugar, and cook two minutes longer; remove, beat five minutes, flavor, and pour into moulds.

Jaune-mange. — One ounce of Coxe's gelatine, soaked in half a cupful of cold water one hour; yolks of four eggs, beaten very light; one cupful of boiling water; one cupful of white wine or pale sherry; one cupful of powdered sugar; one pinch of ground cinnamon; one orange, juice, and half the grated peel; one lemon, juice, and one third the grated peel.

Stir the soaked gelatine into the boiling water until dissolved, take from the fire, and beat gradually into the yolks; return to the inner saucepan with the sugar, orange, lemon, and cinnamon; stir over a clear fire until boiling hot, put in the wine, and strain through a piece of tarlatan; put into moulds wet with cold water, and set in a cold place.

Calf's-foot Jelly. — Four calf's feet, cleaned carefully; four quarts of water; one pint of wine; sugar (loaf) to taste; whites of three eggs, well beaten; juice of one lemon, and half the grated peel.

Boil the calf's feet in the water until it is reduced to one half; strain, and let the liquor stand for twelve hours; skim off the fat carefully, and remove the dregs; melt slowly in a porcelain or bell-metal kettle; add the seasoning, sugar, and whipped whites; boil fast for twelve minutes, skimming well; strain through a double flannel jellybag (i. e., conical in shape), which must be suspended in some way above a deep bowl; do not squeeze the bag, the slower the jelly strains the clearer it will be.

Claret Jelly. — One bottle of ordinary red wine; the juice and grated rind of one lemon; one small jar of red-currant jelly; half a pound of loaf sugar; One ounce of isinglass (more will be required in hot weather); one wineglassful of brandy.

Boil together a few minutes, taking care that the redcurrant jelly is perfectly dissolved, and thoroughly mixed with the other ingredients ; usually ten minutes is enough for this; strain it into a mould, and let it get cold; serve with cream sauce, made as follows: To one pint of cream add a little grated lemon peel; a tablespoonful of lemon juice; a teaspoonful of brandy (burned); and a sufficient quantity of grated and browned cake crumbs; lady-fingers are best; this sauce should be rather thick, and if properly made is delicious.

Ribbon Jelly. — One quart of clear calf's-foot jelly; half a teaspoonful of prepared cochineal; half a teaspoonful of essence of spinach; one cupful of white blanc-mange.

Divide the jelly into three equal portions, coloring one green, the second red, and leaving the third of its natural pale amber; wet a mould with cold water, pour in some red jelly, set on the ice to harden, then pour in the amber, then green, and finally the white blanc-mange, which should form, a broad base; set the mould on the ice between each layer, so that the "ribbons" may be distinctly set and separated; then put on the ice, cover, and leave until firm.

Orange Jelly. — Two oranges, juice of both, and grated rind of one; one lemon, juice and peel; one pint of boiling water; one and a half cupfuls of loaf sugar; one small cupful of white wine; one good pinch of cinnamon.

Squeeze the juice of the fruit into a bowl, and put with it the grated peel and cinnamon; pour over the boiling water, cover closely, and let it stand half an hour; strain, add the sugar, let it come to a boil, stir in the gelatine, and when this is well dissolved, take the saucepan from the fire; strain through a double flannel jelly-bag into moulds.'

Wine Jelly. — Two pounds of loaf sugar; one pint of wine, pale sherry or white wine; one pint of cold water; one pint of Coxe's gelatine; juice of two lemons, and grated peel of one; one quart of boiling water; one pinch of cinnamon.

Soak the gelatine in the water one hour, add to this the sugar, lemon, and cinnamon, pour over all a quart of boiling water, and stir until the gelatine is thoroughly dis- solved; put in the wine, strain through a double flannel bag, pour into moulds, and set in a cool place.

Cider Jelly. — Is made as above, substituting cider for wine.

Bird's-Nest in Jelly ("Common-Sense in the Household"). — One quart of clear jelly; three cupfuls of white blancmange ; fresh rinds of four oranges; one cupful of loaf sugar; nine empty egg-shells, or, better still, tin moulds exactly the shape and size of eggs.

Make the blanc-mange and pour into the egg-shells or moulds; set away in a cold place; cut the rind from the oranges in long narrow strips, and stew in enough water to cover them until they are tender; add a cupful of loaf sugar and stew fifteen or twenty minutes longer; lay them out upon a dish to cool, taking care not to break them; the next morning fill a round glass dish two thirds full of jelly, reserving a cupful; take the blanc-mange out of the shells, and pile in the middle; lay the orange peel round them in the form of the nest; pour the remaining jelly over the straw and eggs, and set away in a cold place to form; when quite firm, turn out on a round dish. Very pretty.

Prune Mould, No. 1. — Take one and a quarter pounds of good prunes (Provencal are the best); put them on the fire covered with cold water; let them boil for a minute, then take them off, drain them, and take out the stones; crack the stones, take out the kernels, and blanch them in boilins: water a minute to take off the brown skin: dissolve half a packet of gelatine in cold water; put it on the fire with four ounces of sugar; let it boil five minutes; color with cochineal and two glassfuls of red wine; place the plums with a kernel on the outside of each in a mould, and pour in the liquid; when set turn it out, and fill up the hole in the middle with whipped cream.

Prune Mould, No. 2. — Half a pound of good prunes, two ounces of white sugar, a piece of lemon, and water enough to cover all.

Stew in a saucepan till tender; remove stones; strain the pulp through a sieve; put back the kernels (blanched); add half an ounce of dissolved gelatine, a wineglassful of red wine, and boil all together; ornament a mould with blanched almonds; pour in the jelly and set on ice; turn out, and serve cold.

PRESERVES AND FRUIT JELLIES.

RULES FOR PRESERVES AND FRUIT JELLIES.

Use none but porcelain-lined preserving-kettles. Select fine, fresh fruit; pick it over carefully, and be sure that it is quite dry. Use the best loaf sugar.

Put up the preserves in rather small jars, of glass or stone china; cover with brandied tissue paper pressed closely to the preserve; then put on a cover of thick paper.

Keep all preserves in a cool, dry, dark closet; watch them carefully for several weeks after making them, and if they show signs of fermentation boil them over, adding more sugar.

Fill all preserve and jelly jars to the very top.

If jellies are not very firm, after six or eight hours' standing, set the jars in the sun with bits of glass to cover them. This may be done day after day until the jelly is properly firm.

If absolutely obliged to use a bell-metal kettle for preserving, scour it with sand just before using it; then set it over the fire with a cupful of vinegar and a handful of salt in it; let this come to a boil, and scour the whole of the inside of the kettle with it; then rinse out the kettle, wipe carefully,and put in the preserves; the instant they are cooked, remove them from the kettle, and wash it clean, even though you intend to return the syrup to it in five minutes.

Apricot Glacees. — Prepare exactly like peach glacees (page 427). They are very good.

Apricot Paste (Cuisiniere Parisienne). — Peel and stone the apricots, and cook in a little water until they are quite tender and transparent; then mash and pass through a hair sieve, drain dry, weigh, and pound them in a mortar with an equal weight of powdered sugar; spread the paste upon flat dishes to dry; after several days cut it into rounds, powder with sugar, dry again, and preserve in boxes.

Apricot Marmalade. — Take firm, ripe apricots, stone and cut out the bad parts of the skin, cut in two, and put into a preserving-kettle in alternate layers of fruit and loaf sugar, allowing half a pound of sugar to each pound of fruit; cook slowly three quarters of an hour, and a little before removing the kettle from the fire add one half of the kernels, blanched; stir well, pack in pots, and when cold close and tie up as usual.

Apricot Cheese. — Is made precisely as you make " Quince Cheese" (page 420).

Apple Ginger. — Take two pounds of pippins or other hard apples; pare, core, and cut them into eight pieces, dropping them into cold water as they are cut; make a syrup of three pounds of white sugar, a little water, and four ounces of ginger (or some piece ginger); stew the apples slowly until transparent, put them into a jar, and strain the juice over them.

Apple Jelly. — Pare, core, and quarter the apples, and put them, together with the skins and cores, in a jar in a slow oven; when quite soft, strain through a coarse mus lin bag, pressing hard to extract all the flavor; then add some lemon juice and set on the fire again, allowing to every pint of liquor a pound of loaf sugar, prepared as in the receipt for " Fruit Jellies " (page 433); let the jelly come to a boil; then take the kettle from the fire, roll the glasses in hot water, and fill with the scalding liquid; cover with brandied tissue paper, and put in a cool place.

Preserved Chestnuts. — Parboil fifty fine, large chestnuts until you can prick them easily with a fork; then take them from the fire, peel and cleanse them thoroughly, and throw them into ice-cold water in which you have previously squeezed the juice of one large lemon; after they have remained in the water long enough to become slightly hardened, throw them into a syrup made of sugar, adding, at the same time, the juice of another lemon, and two or three teaspoonfuls of orange-flower syrup; let all cook together slowly until the mixture has acquired a certain stiffness, when it may be removed from the fire and put into jars.

Preserved Cherries. — Stone the cherries, preserving every drop of juice; weigh the fruit, allowing pound for pound of sugar; put a layer of fruit for one of sugar until all is used up; pour over the juice, and boil gently until the syrup begins to thicken. The short-stem red cherries are best for this preserve. Sweet cherries will not do.

Preserved Strawberries. — Pound for pound; put them into a preserving kettle, over a slow fire, until the sugar melts; boil fast twenty-five minutes; take out the fruit in perforated skimmers, and fill small jars three quarters full; boil and skim the syrup five minutes longer, fill up the jars, and seal while hot; keep in a cool, dry place.

Preserved Pears. — Pare, leaving the stems on, and preserve as you preserve peaches (receipt No. 1, page 426).

Preserved Crab Apples. — Choose for preserving the red Siberian crab; pick over carefully, selecting the perfect ones, leaving the stems, and put into a preserve ket tle with enough warm water to cover them; heat this to boiling slowly, and simmer until the skins break; drain, and skim them, then extract the cores through the blossom ends; weigh them, allow a pound and a quarter of sugar and a teacupful of water to every pound of fruit; boil the water and sugar together until the scum ceases to rise; put in the fruit, cover the kettle, and simmer until the apples are a clear red and tender; take out with a skimmer, spread upon dishes to cool, add to the syrup the juice of one lemon to three pounds of fruit, and boil until clear and rich; fill your jars three quarters full of the apples, pour the syrup in, and when cold tie up.

Preserved Ginger. — Pare the roots of green ginger, and lay in cold water fifteen minutes; boil in three waters, changing the hot for cold every time until very tender; drain, and lay in ice-water. Allow for the syrup a pound and a quarter of loaf sugar to every pound of ginger, and a cupful of water for each pound of sugar; boil and skim until the scum ceases to rise; when the syrup is cold, wipe the ginger dry, and drop it in; let it stand twenty-four hours; drain off, and reheat the syrup; this time put the ginger in when it is blood-warm; do not look at it again for two days; then reboil the syrup, and pour over the ginger scalding hot; in a week drain off once more, boil, and add again, while hot, to the ginger; cover closely. It will be fit for use in a fortnight.

Preserved Figs a la Louisiana. — The weight of ripe figs in sugar; the peel of one lemon and juice of two; a little ginger.

Cover the figs with cold water for twelve hours; then simmer, in water enough to cover them, until tender, and spread out upon a sieve to cool and harden; make a syrup of the sugar and a cupful of cold water to every pound; boil until free from scum, put in the figs, and simmer ten minutes; take them out, and spread upon dishes in the sun ; add the lemons and ginger, boil the syrup thick, give the figs another boil of fifteen minutes, and fill the jars three quarters of the way to the top; fill up with the boiling syrup, cover, and when cold tie up.

Preserved Green Gages. — Wipe the fruit with a cloth, and boil one pound of gages in a syrup made of water and half a pound of sugar; when the fruit is quite cooked make a fresh syrup, allowing a pound of sugar to a pound of fruit, and in it boil the fruit until clear; after putting the fruit into the jars boil the syrup once more, and pour over the gages.

Preserved Egg Plums. — Four pounds of fine egg plums with their stems; four pounds of loaf sugar.

Wash the plums in cold water, and wipe dry, carefully; put the sugar on a slow fire in the preserving-kettle, with as much water as will melt the sugar, and let it simmer slowly, then prick each plum thoroughly with a needle, or a fork with fine prongs, and place a layer of them in the syrup; let them cook until they lose their color a little and the skins begin to break, then lift them out with a perforated skimmer, and place them singly in a large dish to cool; then put another layer of plums in the syrup, and let them cook and cool in the same manner, until the whole are done; as they cool, carefully replace the broken skins so as not to spoil the appearance of the plums; when the last layer is finished return the first to the kettle and boil until transparent; do the same with each layer; while the latest cooked are cooling place the first in glass jars; when all are done pour the hot syrup over them ; when they are cold close as usual; the jelly should be of the color and consistency of rich wine jelly.

Preserved Damsons. — Four pounds of damsons carefully picked over and wiped; four pounds of loaf sugar.

Put on the sugar first with a little water; when it is hot add the fruit and let it boil until quite red; take out the damsons, and put them on a dish in the sun while the syrup boils twenty minutes longer, then fill your jars nearly full with fruit, and pour in the syrup.

Preserved Quinces (Cuisiniere Parisienne), No. 1. — Pound for pound of peeled, cored, and quartered quinces, and loaf sugar.

Put the fruit (before paring or cutting) into cold water, and let it remain on the fire until scalded; when soft, remove from the fire, and let the quinces cool, then quarter, core, and lastly pare them; prepare the syrup, pound for pound, and boil it quickly that it may not turn dark; the syrup must not be allowed to jelly.

Preserved Quinces, No. 2. — Wash and wipe the quinces, then weigh, peel, core, and quarter them; put the parings and seeds on to boil in a little water, then put the cut-up quinces into a preserving-kettle with enough water to cover them, and let them boil until you can pierce them with a fork; then take them from the kettle, strain into the water in the kettle the water in which the parings and seeds have been boiled, put the parboiled quinces into another preserving-kettle, and to every pound (equal quantities) of fruit and sugar add one pint of the quince water; boil the quinces until clear, then take out with a skimmer, and put upon clean dishes to drain; boil the syrup until it jellies; if there is more quince water than is needed for the weight of fruit and sugar it should be added in the beginning, allowing a pound more of sugar for each pint of water; put the quinces into jars,pour the boiling hot jelly over them, and, when cold, close as usual; if there be more jelly than suffices to cover the fruit, put it into separate jars; it is very good.

Quince Marmalade. — Pare, core, and slice the quinces, stewing skins, cores, and seeds in a vessel by themselves, with barely enough water to cover them; when these have simmered long enough, strain this water through a thick cloth; then put the quinces into a preserving-kettle, pour over them the quince water when almost cold, and boil, stirring the quinces, and mashing them with a wooden spoon as they become soft; to every three pounds of fruit you may allow the juice of three oranges; when all is reduced to a smooth paste stir in a scant three quarters of a pound of sugar to every pound of fruit; boil ten minutes more, stirring constantly; take off, and when cool put into small jars; when cold, cover and seal as usual.

Quince Cheese. — Is quince marmalade boiled down very thick, and packed tightly into jars; it will turn out firm as cheese.

Preserved Apples. — Choose firm, well-flavored pippins, and preserve exactly as you do quinces, adding, however, the juice of three lemons to every three pounds of fruit.

Preserved Fox Grapes. — Split each grape, and take out the seeds, pour boiling water upon them, add a pinch of alum, scatter a few grape leaves among them, and cover close; let them stand until they become yellow, then make a syrup, allowing one pound of sugar to one pound of grapes; drain the fruit, and put into it the boiling syrup, keep the kettle covered while boiling; put into jars, and, when cold, close and tie up as usual.

Oranges, Whole, in Syrup. — Take six ounces of white sugar, one gill of water, the juice of two lemons, and the rind of one, and of half an orange, peeled thin.

Boil until the syrup clarifies, and pour hot over eight oranges peeled to the pulp; a little cochineal makes them prettier.

Florida Lemon Preserve. — Grate the lemons to break the oil-vessels, soak them for two days in salt and water, and after this for one day in fresh water; drain them well, and weigh them, allowing each pound of fruit one pound and a quarter of sugar, and one pint of water to every pound of sugar.

Ogeechee Limes. — Boil the limes until soft, and push out quickly the head of each while hot; then make a syrup of one pound of sugar to three pints of water, and boil it until clear; then throw in the limes, and let them boil until transparent.

Green Sweetmeat, No. 1. — Lay as many mangoes as you require in strong salt water for ten days, slit them, take out the seeds, throw them into fresh water, and let them remain one or two days, then boil them in vinegar for several hours, after which soak them for a day or two in fresh water, changing the water every day, or until no vinegar remains; make a syrup of ginger tea and loaf sugar, allowing three pounds of sugar to one of melon; boil for several hours, or until quite clear.

Green Sweetmeat, No. 2. — Take a thick watermelon rind, pare off the outer rind, cut it into any funny shape, and throw into a bell-metal skillet with cold water and a piece of alum the size of an egg to every three pounds of rind; let it boil until tender, and the rind becomes of a pale green color, then pour off the alum, and let it stand in cold water twelve hours, or longer if the alum is not soaked out; then weigh the rind, and to every pound of rind add a pound and a half of loaf sugar, and throw them into fresh ginger tea, a pint to the pound; let it settle, and when clear add mace and lemon peel; boil it until sufficiently done, of which you may judge by observing if the sugar has penetrated the rind, taking care always to have syrup enough to cover the rind; let it stand some weeks before using it.

Beaufort Green - Orange Preserve. — Green oranges, plucked from the trees in September or October; grate (with a medium grater) all over lightly but thoroughly; throw each orange, after grating it, into salt and water until all are grated, then, with a sharp penknife, cut a hole in the stem end of the orange, and cut out all the pulp in the centre which contains the seeds; then scoop out with a small silver spoon as much of the pulp as possible, without injuring the orange, which must keep its shape intact. Weigh the oranges, and to every pound allow two pounds of the best sugar; measure a pint of water to a pound of sugar; stir it well, and put it on the fire to boil until it forms a thin syrup; put the oranges in the syrup carefully, one by one, and let them boil steadily but slowly all day; if they boil rapidly they break; to ascertain if they are done, take up one in a ladle and look at it in a strong light; if there are no opaque spots in it, it is done; then pierce with a straw; if the straw passes through them easily there is no doubt. Shaddocks are preserved in the same manner.

Florida-Orange Marmalade. — The large, thick-skinned, sour orange is the best for this marmalade. Grate the oranges slightly to break the oil-vessels; then peel, cutting the peel into long, very thin strips; then put the peel on to boil, changing the water four times; meanwhile prepare the pulp; this is done by slitting down each fig or compartment of the orange with a sharp knife, and scraping out the pulp free from skin or seeds; after the peel has boiled sufficiently, strain off the water, and pound one half of it in a mortar; cut the other half into fine shreds; mix these with the pulp, and measure it; allow one pound of loaf sugar to every pint of pulp and peel mixed; put it over a slow fire, stirring it constantly until done.

Orange Marmalade, Dundee. — To every pound of grated orange peel add one and a quarter pounds of sugar; cut and squeeze the oranges over a strainer, and put the seeds into a pitcher, with a pint and a half of water, to stand all night; boil the peel in several waters until clear and almost free from bitter taste; let all stand for twenty-four hours, then cut the peel into long, thin strips; add the sugar, with a small tumbler of water, to the jelly made by the seeds and juice, and boil for one hour, taking off the scum as fast as it rises.

Orange Marmalade, Sorrento. — Weigh the oranges, then grate them to break the oil-vessels; cut them lengthwise, taking out the seeds and pulp; put the skins on to boil, changing the water once; when boiled tender, pound two thirds in a mortar, and cut the rest into narrow strips; put in the same quantity of sugar that the oranges weighed before grating; wet the sugar with a little water, and let it come to a boil; then put into it the juice and scraped pulp, the pounded skin and the chipped skin, and boil it, stirring constantly towards the last.

St. Martinis Orange Marmalade. — Take sour Sicily oranges, twelve pounds; twelve pounds of sugar.

Pare the oranges down like apples, and soak the peel in five or six quarts of water, until tender; throw the water away, after skimming it off; cut the peel into small strips; put the sugar in a kettle, and cut the oranges in half, and take a small, strong spoon, and take out the juice and pulp, and pour it over the sugar, carefully taking out all the seeds; take the white skins and throw over them two quarts of warm water; soak until they are soft, mash it through a sieve, and you will have about one and three quarter pounds; then take the strained pulp,the peel,the sugar, and the juice, and boil all together; after it commences to boil hard, it should boil for twenty minutes or half an hour, until quite thick; put into glasses.

Orange-and-Apple Marmalade. — Two dozen oranges, weighed, peeled, freed from seeds and all the tough white pulp; boil the peel for half an hour, then take off all the white inside skin, leaving only the thin yellow rind; cut this into chips the thickness of a straw, and put them into cold water to extract the bitterness; change the water several times; then add to the oranges one pound of grated apples, and the weight of the oranges in sugar, with another pound for the apples; put them over a moderate fire in a preserving-kettle, throw in the rind chips, and let the whole cook until clear and thick.

Preserved Sour-Orange Peel. — Rasp the peel with a coarse grater to break the oil-vessels, then cut the orange into quarters, taking out all of the inside; put the peel in brine for several days, then extract the salt by soaking it in fresh water several days, changing it twice a day; make a thin syrup and boil it down; put in the peel, and boil it until you can pierce it with a straw; when done,put the pieces in glass jars, with plenty of syrup; allow one pound and a quarter of loaf sugar to every pound of peel.

Preserved Orange Blossoms. — Clean fresh orange blossoms, and cut them up, mincing them rather finely; sprinkle them well with lemon juice, and cook with finely sifted white sugar and a sufficient quantity of water, taking care not to throw in the orange blossoms until the syrup begins to froth; then let all boil together, beating smartly the while with a wooden spatula, and withdraw the casserole from the fire the moment the mixture begins to swell into bubbles; it should then be placed in small pretty paper or porcelain boxes, or in small tin forms, shaped like tiny oranges, or large orange blossoms. From these forms it can be removed when cold.

Preserved Roses. — Take fresh rose petals, dip them in rose water, mash them, and boil the juice with a sufficient quantity of crystallized sugar; color this syrup with cochineal or extract of crimson roses, and just before taking it from the fire dip into it, one by one, some large, firm, fresh rose petals; they will candy beautifully; when cold, they should be lightly dusted with finely sifted crystallized sugar. The conserve may be put into jars with brandied paper on the top.

Preserved Violets. — Take the freshest and most fragrant violets, and pound them in a mortar in order to extract the color and savor; have ready a syrup of finely clarified sugar; add to this when tepid the juice of the violets, and a few drops of lemon juice, together with a very few fresh violets; put all again on the fire and cook for some moments, beating or stirring hard all the time with a wooden spatula; it should be withdrawn from the fire the moment the syrup begins to swell into bubbles.

Peaches Preserved Whole. — Fifteen pounds of clingstone peaches, pared, but not cut up or stoned ; seven and a half pounds of loaf sugar.

Dissolve one half of the sugar in as little water as possible; set the kettle on the fire, and when it begins to simmer throw in a layer of peaches; let them boil from twenty to thirty minutes; then take them out, free from syrup, and lay them on a flat dish to cool; throw in another layer, and so on until all are cooked; after you have boiled two or three layers the syrup will have increased; by degrees add the rest of the sugar, and, when all are done, boil up the syrup until a little thick; then, as you take the kettle from the fire, stir in carefully and thoroughly half a pint of alcohol; put the peaches into jars; pour on the boiling syrup, and when cold cover and seal as usual.

Preserved Peaches, No. 1. — Fine yellow peaches, pared and stoned; equal weight of loaf sugar with the pared and stoned peaches.

Put a layer of loaf sugar at the bottom of a preservingkettle, then a layer of fruit, and so on until the kettle is full; put the kettle in a cool corner of the range until the sugar is dissolved; then boil the fruit until it is clear and thoroughly cooked; then take out the pieces with a perforated skimmer, and lay on dry dishes; boil the syrup in the kettle until quite thick; fill the jars half full with fruit, pour over the syrup, adding one quarter of the kernels which have been blanched and boiled until soft in enough water to barely cover them; when cold, cover and close as usual.

Preserved Peaches, No. 2. — Proceed precisely as above, only adding the water in which the kernels have been boiled to the fruit and sugar as soon as the sugar is melted.

Peach Marmalade. — Pare, stone, and weigh the fruit; heat slowly to draw out the juice, stirring up often from the bottom with a wooden spoon; after it is hot, boil up quickly, still stirring, for three quarters of an hour; add then the sugar, allowing three quarters of a pound to each pound of fruit; boil up well for five minutes, taking off every particle of scum; add the juice of a lemon for every three pounds of fruit, and the water in which one fourth of the kernels have been boiled and steeped; stew all together ten minutes, stirring to a smooth paste, and take from the fire; put up in small jars, and, when cold, cover and close as usual.

Peach Figs. — Pare the peaches, and cut them in half; weigh them, and allow half a pound of sugar to every pound of fruit; put the fruit and sugar alternately into the kettle, and heat all gradually until the sugar is dissolved; then boil until clear; take the peaches out with a perforated skimmer, lay them on dishes, without any of the syrup, in the sun, and turn them frequently until dry, putting them on dry dishes as the syrup drains away from them; when dry enough to handle, pack them in drums or boxes, with layers of sifted sugar, beginning and ending with sugar; if you have any syrup left you may boil more peaches in it.

Candied Peaches. — Four pounds of peaches, peeled and cut in quarters; one pound of loaf sugar.

Simmer sugar and peaches in a very little water, until a straw can pierce them; take them from the kettle with a perforated skimmer, roll each piece in sifted sugar, place them on dishes, the pieces to lie a little apart to dry; put the dishes in a sunny room — not in the sun, but where the air can blow over them; turn the pieces from time to time, and sift a little more sugar over them; they will take some days to dry and crystallize; use mosquito netting to keep off the flies.

Peach Jam. — For every pound of peaches allow three quarters of a pound of sugar; pare the peaches and slice fine; put them on the fire in a preserving-kettle with a little water, about a pint to a peck of fruit; boil quickly, stirring constantly to prevent burning; when it is easily mashed, add the sugar; as soon as it begins to boil again stir incessantly, and do not let the fire be too strong, or it will scorch; stir it until it is a smooth pulp, and put it in wide-mouthed jars; when cold, paste the jars up tight.

Peach Glacies (Cuisiniere Parisienne). — Take fine peaches, not quite ripe, peel, and put into an earthen pot; pour on enough boiling water to cover them; cover the pot closely, and set away for four hours; clarify some loaf sugar, allowing a pound of sugar for each pound of fruit; put your peaches into the syrup and let them cook until they are tender, but not until they break; take them out; put them carefully one by one into a jar; boil down the syrup until thick and clear, stir into^it a wineglassful of brandy, pour boiling hot over the peaches; cork, cover, and set away.

Raisine de Paisins (Cuisiniere Parisienne). — String the grapes, which should be sweet and ripe, press out the juice, put on the fire, and boil down to a fourth of the quantity, stirring constantly; when reduced so far, strain, replace on the fire, boil to a thick syrup, pour boiling hot into jars, cover with brandied paper, again with thick paper, and set away in a cool, dark place.

Pineapple Marmalade. — Pare, slice, core, and weigh the pineapple, then cut into small bits; make a syrup of a teacupful of water to two pounds of sugar; melt, and heat to a boil; heat the chopped pineapple in another vessel, set that in a vessel of boiling water, covering closely, to keep in the flavor; when it is smoking hot all through, and begins to look clear, add to the syrup; boil together half an hour, stirring all the while until it is a clear, bright paste.

Preserved Pineapple. — Pare, cut into slices, core, and weigh, allowing a pound of loaf sugar to each pound of fruit; put into alternate layers in the kettle, and pour in water, allowing a teacupful to each pound of sugar; heat to a boil, take out the pineapple, and spread upon dishes in the sun; boil and skim the syrup half an hour, return the pineapple to the kettle, and boil fifteen minutes; take it out, pack in wide-mouthed jars, pour on the scalding syrup, cover to keep in the heat, and, when cold, tie up, first putting brandied tissue paper on the top.

Pineapple Jam. — Twist off the top and bottom leaves of the pineapples, and cut them in quarters, lengthwise, leaving on the skins; grate them on a coarse grater; the skin will enable you to hold it firmly and not waste pulp or juice; to every pound of the grated pulp add three quarters of a pound of powdered sugar; boil and stir it well, until it begins to look of a clear amber color; put it into jars when hot, and paper them when cold.

Raisine de Bourgoyne (Cuisiniere Parisienne). — Take fine, sound, sweet, ripe grapes; string, and press in a coarse muslin bag to expel the juice; put it on the fire in a porcelain-lined preserving-kettle, and boil down to one half the original quantity; skim and stir constantly; when the juice is reduced one half, put into it some fine pears (the Messire Jean pear is the best for this purpose), peeled, cored, and cut into quarters; continue boiling until the juice is reduced to a third of the original quantity, the pears will then be sufficiently cooked; pour boilinghot into porcelain jars; cover each jar with a plate or saucer, and set for twelve hours (or during the night) in an oven in which you have baked during the daytime. This is, perhaps, the best of preserves, but it is only possible to make it in the South, where ripe grapes are sweet as honey; if made of Northern grapes you must add to each ten pounds of cooked juice (i. e., boiled down one half) three pounds of loaf sugar; in this case it is not boiled down to so thick a syrup in the- second boiling; small Crecy carrots cut into quarters may be substituted for pears, but must be put on at the first boiling of the juice, as they take longer to cook than pears.

Fruits Preserved in Vinegar, without Cooking (Cuisiniere Russe). — Take some of the finest cider vinegar (the quantity must depend upon the amount of preserves you wish to make), throw into this vinegar some pounded loaf sugar, enough to reduce the vinegar to a piquant syrup, which is not too sour; when this is smooth and thick, put into it fine ripe peaches, pears, plums, etc., peeled, cored, and cut in quarters; cover with brandied paper, etc., and set away in a cool, dry, dark place; they will be fit for use in a few weeks; the fruit should be perfectly ripe, and the weather dry and warm.

Watermelon Preserve. — Lay the rind of citron melon in salt water for three days, and then in fresh water for the same time; make a syrup, allowing a pound of loaf sugar to one of the rind, and let the rind lie in it all night; then boil all together until clear, adding green ginger, and lemon peel to flavor it.

Pink Watermelon Preserve. — Cut the pink part of the melon into squares, and remove all the seeds with a penknife; to one pound of fruit allow three quarters of a pound of loaf sugar, and let it stand for two hours; then remove the fruit, and boil the syrup, skimming it carefully, then put in the fruit; slice a lemon, and a few pieces of green ginger-root; boil them until tender in a little water, and, when they are done, add them to the syrup; boil it until the melon is tender and clear, and can be pierced with a straw; as soon as cool put into glass jars, and fasten tight; it will be fit for use in six weeks.

Bottled Plums, or any Fruit for Tarts. — Fill widemouthed bottles with the fruit, and as much cold water as they will hold, and cover them with bladder; then put them into a kettle of hot water, first wrapping cloths or haybands round the bottles to prevent their touching; let them get scalding hot, but not boil; then take the kettle from the fire, leaving the bottles in the water until it is quite cold again; then dry the bottles, and put them away in a dry, cool, dark place. When the above directions are obeyed, the bottled fruit will be found excellent. This receipt is especially good for stoned fruit. The bladder used for covering the bottles should be soaked in water for forty-four hours beforehand.

Brandied Grapes. — Choose large, close bunches of ripe grapes; wash, and dry them thoroughly with a clean cloth; remove any grape that may be in the least defective; with a needle prick each grape in three places; have ready a sufficiency of double-refined loaf sugar powdered and sifted; put some sugar in the bottom of a jar, then put in a bunch of grapes, and cover thickly with sugar; then another bunch, then more sugar, and so on until the jar is nearly full, finishing with a layer of sugar; then fill up the jar with the best white brandy, cover as closely as possible, and set them away.

Brandied Cherries. — Weigh the finest Morellos, having cut off half the stalk; prick them with a new needle, and drop them into a jar or a wide-mouthed bottle,; pound three fourths of their weight of rock candy, strew over, fill up with white brandy, and tie a bladder over.

Brandied Peaches, Pears, or Plums. — Four pounds of fruit, pared; if plums, pricked; four pounds of loaf sugar; one pint of the best white brandy.

Make a syrup of the sugar and just enough water to dissolve it; let this come to a boil, put the fruit in, and boil five minutes; having removed the fruit carefully, let the syrup boil fifteen minutes longer, or until it thickens well, add the brandy, and take the kettle from the fire; pour the hot syrup over the fruit, and seal in glass jars. If, after the fruit is taken from the fire, a reddish liquor oozes from it, drain this off before adding the clear syrup.

Brandied Berries. — Make a syrup of a pound of loaf sugar and half a gill of water for every two pounds of fruit; heat to boiling, stirring to prevent burning, and pour over the berries while warm, not hot; cover, and let them stand for an hour, put all into a preserving-kettle, and heat slowly; boil five minutes, take out the fruit with a perforated skimmer, and boil the syrup twenty minutes; add a pint of brandy for every five pounds of fruit, pour over the berries burning hot, and seal.

Brandied Cherries d la Parisienne. — Take fine, red cherries, not very ripe; cut off one half of the stem and put them into a glass jar with a small piece of cinnamon and a pinch of coriander seed; add clarified sugar in the proportion of a pound of sugar for a pound of fruit, and fill up the jar with brandy, seal, and set away. They will be fit for use in two months.

Rules for Canning. — Always use glass cans with good screw lids and gum rings.

Use none but the best, fresh, ripe fruit.

Roll each can in hot water before filling it, put the fruit or vegetable into the can scalding hot, fill to the brim, and screw the top on at once.

Canned Peaches. — Pare the peaches, stone, and cut in half; as they are cut throw them immediately into glass jars; have ready a cold syrup of one half pint of cold water to one pound of sugar; fill the jars with this syrup and fasten them up; put a large boiler over the fire, cover the bottom of it with boards, and on these set the jars of peaches; fill up the boiler with cold water nearly to the top of the jars, and let them remain until the water boils; remove them carefully, and give the lids another screwing; repeat the screwing in a day or two, as they sometimes slip; keep in a cool, dry place.

Canned Pears. — Use Seckel or Bartlett pears; prepare a syrup, allowing a pint of water and a quarter of a pound of sugar to each quart of fruit; as fast as you peel the pears, drop each into a pan of clear water; when the syrup has come to a fast boil put in the pears carefully, not to bruise them, and boil until they look clear and can be easily pierced with a fork; have the cans ready, rolled in hot water, pack with the pears, fill to the brim with scalding syrup, and seal.

Canned Damsons, Green Gages, or other Plums. — Prick the plums with a needle to prevent bursting; prepare a syrup, allowing to every three quarts of fruit a gill of pure water and a quarter of a pound of sugar; when the sugar is dissolved and the water is bloodwarm, put in the plums; heat slowly to a boil; let them boil five minutes, not fast, fill up the jars with plums, pour in the scalding syrup until it runs down the sides, and seal.

Canned Currants, Cherries, or any Berries. — Heat slowly to boiling in a large kettle; when they begin to boil add one tablespoonful of sugar to each quart of fruit; before doing this dip out enough juice to leave the berries almost dry before putting in the sugar; boil all together fifteen minutes, and can instantly.

Fruit Jellies. — Put the fruit on in a stone jar, place this in a kettle of tepid water, and set on the fire; let it boil, closely covered, until the fruit is broken to pieces; strain, pressing the bag, a stout, coarse one, hard, putting in a few handfuls each time, and between each squeezing turning it inside out to scald off the pulp and skins; to each pint of juice allow a pound of loaf sugar; set the juice on alone to boil, and while it is boiling put the sugar into shallow dishes or pans and heat it in the oven, watching and stirring the sugar to prevent burning; boil the juice just twenty minutes from the time it begins fairly to boil; by this time the sugar should be very hot; throw the sugar into the boiling juice, stirring rapidly all the time; withdraw the spoon when all is thoroughly dissolved; let the jelly come to a boil to make all certain; withdraw the kettle instantly from the fire; roll your glasses and cups in hot water, and fill with the scalding liquid; the jelly will form within an hour; when cold close and tie up as you do preserves. Currant Jelly. — Make precisely as above.

Green-Grape Jelly. — Make as above, but allow a pound and a half of sugar to a pint of juice.

Wild-Cherry-and-Currant Jelly. — Two thirds of wild cherries, crushed, stones and all; one third of red currants; a pound of sugar to a pint of juice, and make as you do plain currant jelly.

Black-Cap-and-Currant Jelly. — Two parts of black- � caps, or red raspberries, and one of currants. Proceed as above.

Cold Currant Jelly (Cuisiniere Parisienne). — String the currants and crush them in an earthen pot, taking care, however, not to crush the seeds; then place a fine wire sieve upon an earthen pot, pour currants and juice on the sieve, and let the juice filter through; when they no longer drip, put them into a coarse muslin bag, and squeeze out the remaining juice into another pot; examine the juice carefully, and if not perfectly clear strain again; then weigh the juice, and allow two pounds of clarified sugar to one pound of juice; mix and stir long and well until the amalgamation is perfect; then cover the jar, and put it into a very cold cellar for twenty-four hours, going in, however, to stir it thoroughly at least three times during this period; then pour into small jars holding about a pint, cover with brandied paper, and then with bladder, and put into a very cold cellar. They should not be touched until winter has fairly set in. This jelly is superior in flavor to any other currant jelly.

Seeded Currants (Cuisiniere Parisienne). — String large, fine currants; take up each currant carefully, and extract the seeds, being careful not to break the skin; then weigh the fruit; allow a pound and a half of the finest loaf sugar to a pound of fruit; put the sugar on the fire, allowing half a pint of water to each pound of sugar; clarify this syrup with the white of an egg beaten into half a tumblerful of water; stir, skim, and cook slowly, simmering rather than boiling; put the currants into this, boil up once, and withdraw from the fire; pour into glass jars, cover with brandied paper, then with thick, white paper, tie up and put away.

Four-fruit Jelly. — One pound of cherries, stoned; one pound of currants, strung; one pound of strawberries, strung; one pound of raspberries.

Put all the fruit into a pot with four pounds of loaf sugar, and put over a quick fire; boil steadily; when the sugar is melted, the fruits dissolved, and the preserve begins to rise to the surface, remove the pot from the fire, strain through a sieve into small jars, cover with brandied paper, seal, and set away. The fruit may be put into other jars as a marmalade.

Crab-Apple Jelly. — Siberian crab apples, cut in pieces, but not pared or seeded; put the fruit into a stone jar, set � in a pot of hot water, and let it boil eight or nine hours; leave in the jar all night, covered closely; next morning squeeze out the juice, allow pound for pint, and make as you do currant jelly.

Quince Jelly. — Pare and core the quinces, and add for every five pounds of fruit a cupful of water; put peelings, cores, and all into a stone jar; set this in a pot of boiling water, and when the fruit is soft and broken, proceed as with other jellies.

Peach Jelly. — Pare, stone, and slice the peaches, and put into a jar with one third of the kernels; heat in a pot of boiling water, stirring, from time to time, until the fruit v is well broken; strain, and to every pint of peach juice add the juice of a lemon; measure again, allowing a pound of sugar to each pint of juice; heat the sugar very hot, and add when the juice has boiled twenty minutes; let it come to a boil, and take instantly from the fire.

Ripe-Grape Jelly. — One pound of sugar to each pint of juice.

Proceed as for other fruit jellies.

Strawberry Jelly. — Dip a coarse muslin bag into cold water, wring out, put in the strawberries, and press and squeeze to expel the juice; put the juice into a pot, allowing three quarters of a pound of loaf sugar to a pint of juice; cook fifteen or twenty minutes, stirring often; skim, and pour into jars, cover with brandied tissue paper, these with thick paper, and set away.

Rose Jelly. — Make a clear, firm apple jelly; just as the jelly is about to form, color it a bright rose color with cochineal, and add a drop or two of essence of rose, enough to give it a distinct rose flavor; stir, skim, pour into jars, cover as above, and set away.

Strawberry Jam. — Three quarters of a pound of sugar to every pound of fruit; one pint of red-currant juice to every four pounds of strawberries.

Boil the currant juice and strawberries half an hour, stirring all the time; add the sugar, and boil up rapidly for twenty minutes, skimming carefully; put into small jars, and, when cold, close as usual.

Gooseberry Jam. — Make as above, omitting the currant juice, using ripe gooseberries, and boiling the fruit one hour before the sugar is put in, and another after; put up as usual.

Raspberries Preserved Whole. — Five quarts of fine raspberries; pound for pound of loaf sugar — i. e., equal weight of sugar and fruit.

Select from the raspberries three pints of the largest and finest, and set them aside; put the remainder into a preserving-kettle, and set them on a moderate fire to extract the juice; when sufficiently boiled put into a coarse muslin bag, and press out the juice; strain it; then put the sugar on to boil, with just enough water to melt it; when this syrup has boiled a few minutes, and all the scum has been removed, throw in the whole raspberries, and let them simmer slowly; as soon as they begin to look ragged, take them out with a perforated skimmer, and spread upon flat dishes to cool; throw into the syrup the strained juice, and let it boil until nearly a jelly; then throw in again the whole fruit, which has been cooling; give it a short boiling, then remove the kettle from the fire, fill up the glasses, and, when cold, close as usual. This is a beautiful preserve.

Raspberry Jam. — Three quarters of a pound of sugar to every pound of fruit; one pint of currant juice to every pound of fruit.

Boil the fruit half an hour, mashing and stirring well; add the sugar, and cook twenty minutes more; put up as you do preserves.

Blackberry Jam. — Make as above, omitting the currant juice.

Apple Jam. — Weigh equal quantities of brown sugar and good sour apples; pare, core, and chop them fine; make a syrup of the sugar, and clarify it very thoroughly, then add the apples, the grated rind of two or three lemons, and a few pieces of white ginger; boil until the apples look clear and yellow.

Apple Butter. — Boil down a kettleful of cider to two thirds the original quantity; pare, core, and slice juicy apples, and put as many into the cider as it will cover. Boil slowly, stirring with a flat stick, and when the apples are tender to breaking, take them out with a perforated skimmer, draining them well; put in more apples, as many as the cider will hold, and stew them soft; take from the fire, put all together into a large crock, cover, and leave twelve hours; then return to the fire and boil down, stirring all the while; spice to taste; keep in stone jars in a dry, cool place.

Pear Butter. — One peck of pears, peeled, cored, and chopped; five pounds of sugar (soft); half a pint of vinegar; stir as for apple butter.

Peach Butter. — Half a bushel of uupared peaches; two quarts of best molasses.

Stew in water first, and mash with a potato - masher; stir as for apple butter.

Tomato Butter. — Ten pounds of tomatoes, pared and cut up; four pounds of brown sugar; one quart of vinegar.

Put the tomatoes into a preserving-kettle, add the sugar and the vinegar, stir all together until they become as thick as apple butter, stirring often to prevent burning.

PICKLES.

GENERAL RULES FOR MAKING PICKLES.

Use none but the very best vinegar; boil in porcelainlined pots; keep in hard stoneware or glass jars; examine them every month, throwing away the soft ones, and, if they are not keeping well, drain off and scald the vinegar, adding a cupful of sugar for each gallon, and pour boiling hot over the pickles; if, on the contrary, the pickles are keeping well, throw in a liberal handful of sugar for every gallon; keep the pickles always covered with vinegar.

Pickled Cabbage, White. — Two gallons of vinegar; one pint of white mustard seed; four ounces of ginger; three ounces of peppercorns; one ounce of allspice; two ounces of cloves; one ounce of mace; one ounce of nutmeg; two ounces of turmeric; one large handful of chopped garlic; one large handful of scraped horseradish; four pounds of sugar; two ounces of celery seed; three lemons sliced fine.

Mix all and set in the sun for three days; peel off the outer leaves of the cabbage, cut in quarters, and put in a kettle of boiling brine; cook three minutes; take out, drain, and cover thickly with salt; spread it out in the sun to dry, then shake off the salt, and cover with cold vinegar in which has been steeped enough turmeric to color it well; leave it in this two weeks; then pack in jars, pouring over them the seasoned vinegar; this pickle must stand two months.

Sliced- Cucumber Pickle (" Common-Sense in the Household "). — Two dozen large cucumbers, sliced, and boiled, in vinegar enough to cover them, one hour; set aside in the hot vinegar. For each gallon of cold vinegar allow: One pound of sugar; one tablespoonful of cinnamon; one tablespoonful of ginger; one tablespoonful of black pepper; one tablespoonful of celery seed; one teaspoonful of mace; one teaspoonful of allspice; one teaspoonful of cloves; one tablespoonful of turmeric; one tablespoonful of scraped horseradish; one tablespoonful of sliced garlic; half a teaspoonful of cayenne pepper.

Put in the encumbers and stew two hours. This pickle is ready for use when cold.

Pickled Cauliflower (" Common-Sense in the Household "). — Take firm, white cauliflowers, and cut into sprays; drop into a kettle of boiling brine, and boil three minutes; take them out, lay on a sieve or cloth, sprinkle thickly with salt, and, when dry, brush this off; cover with cold vinegar for two days, setting the jar in the sun; then pack carefully in glass jars, and pour over it scalding vinegar seasoned as follows: For each gallon of vinegar allow — one cupful of white sugar; a dozen blades of mace; one tablespoonful of celery seed; two dozen white peppercorns; two small red-pepper pods chopped fine; a tablespoonful of coriander seed; the same of whole mustard.

Boil five minutes; repeat the scalding once a week for five weeks; then tie up and set away; cover closely from first to last.

Pickled Purple Cabbage. — Shred the cabbage, lay in a wooden tray, sprinkle thickly with salt, and set in the cellar until the next day; drain off the brine, wipe dry, lay in the sun two hours, and cover with cold vinegar for twelve; to enough vinegar to cover the cabbage add a cupful of sugar for every gallon, a teaspoonful of celery seed for every pint, and equal quantities of mace, cloves, and whole white peppers; pack the cabbage in a stone jar, boil the vinegar and spice five minutes and pour on hot; cover, and set away in a cool, dry place; it must stand six weeks.

Gherkin Pickle. — Choose small, firm, fresh gherkins; pack in a stone jar in layers, strewing each layer thickly with salt; pack the top layer out of sight in salt, and pour enough cold water over to cover all; cover the jar, adding a weight to keep the cover down; leave in the brine — if it be strong enough to bear up an egg — for a month, stirring up every other day from the bottom; when ready to pickle them, throw away the brine and the softened gherkins if there are any, and soak the rest in cold, fresh water for twenty-four hours; change the water and leave for the same length of time; line the pickle kettle with green vine leaves, and lay the pickles evenly within it, scattering a very little powdered alum (in the proportion of a pigeon's egg to a two-gallon kettlefnl) over each layer; cover the last layer of pickles with three layers of vine leaves; cover closely, and steam over a slow fire five or six hours; when the pickles are a fine green, remove the leaves and throw the gherkins into ice-cold water, in which they must remain while you prepare the vinegar; to each gallon of vinegar allow a cupful of sugar, three dozen of whole black peppers, the same of cloves, half as much allspice, and one dozen blades of mace; boil five minutes; put the gherkins into a stone jar, and pour over the vinegar, scalding hot; cover closely, and after two days scald the vinegar, and return to the pickles; repeat this process three times more, at intervals of two, four, and six days; cover with a stoneware or wooden top, tie a strong cloth over this, and set away for two months in a cool, dry place.

Cucumber Pickles. — Are made and treated in precisely the same way as above.

Stuffed Bell-Pepper Mangoes. — Are made as in the receipt for Louisiana mangoes.

String Beans and Radish Pods. — Take them just before they change color, and treat exactly as you treat gherkins and cucumbers.

Gooseberry Chutnee, or PidcocFs Pickle. — Two quarts of uuripe gooseberries, boiled in a quart of vinegar; one pound of brown sugar boiled to a syrup with a pint of vinegar; one pound of salt; half a pound of button onions chopped fine; three quarters of a pound of garlic, bruised and chopped; one pound of powdered ginger; half a pound of cayenne pods, chopped; one pound of mustard seed, bruised; one pound of raisins, seeded; two quarts of the best vinegar.

When the gooseberries have been boiled allow them to get quite cold; then put them into a large bowl, and gradually mix in the other ingredients and the remainder of the vinegar, stirring continually with a wooden spoon until all the ingredients are well blended together, and the chutney is as smooth as velvet; put into wide-mouthed jars or bottles, and tie down with bladder.

Indian Pickle, Bombay. — Take one pound of ginger, let it lie in water one night, then scrape, and cut it in slices; put it in a pot with dry salt, and let it stand until the other ingredients are ready; peel and cut in pieces one clove of garlic, and salt it for three days, putting it into the sun to dry; then throw it into a gallon of the best vinegar placed in a strong jar, which must not be more than three parts full; add to it a pound of bruised mustard seed, some salt dried in the sun, half an ounce of powdered turmeric, half an ounce of long pepper, half a pound of flour of mustard, half a pound of shallots, a few cloves, a quarter of a pound of sugar, and a little mace; stir all together; whatever articles are to be pickled must be dried in the sun; the cauliflowers must be scalded in strong brine, and then peeled, cabbage cut in, celery and radishes scraped, French beans and asparagus salted, and then scalded in salt and water, and dried in the sun; in this way all sorts of fruits or greens, as they come in season, may be added; as the vinegar wastes add fresh.

Indian Pickle, Calcutta. — Four ounces of curry-powder; four ounces of mustard seed; four large roots of garlic; half a pint of finest oil of Lucca; one ounce of chilies; three ounces of long pepper; three ounces of cloves; half an ounce of allspice; two quarts of boiling vinegar; mix.

The cauliflowers, cabbages, and onions are to be prepared as in the above receipt, and then to be put in a Dutch oven before the fire for five minutes, after which they are to be added, and they will be fit to eat in a month.

Pickled Beets. — Boil some beets until tender, and pare and slice them; then boil as much vinegar as will cover them, with some mace, cloves, and peppercorns; pour this over while boiling, salt to taste, and cover closely; they will be fit for use in twenty-four hours.

Indian Pickle, Delhi. — Two ounces of celery seed; four ounces of peppercorns; six ounces of mustard seed; eight ounces of saffron; six ounces of pounded ginger; one ounce of cayenne pepper.

Put this to steep eight days in a gallon of vinegar; take any garden vegetables, cucumbers, turnips, carrots, beets, white or red radishes, little melons just formed, snap beans, little heads of cauliflower, nasturtium seeds, little lemons, oranges, apples, peaches, green walnuts, blanched almonds, or any peeled ripe nuts, and plenty of red-pepper pods; cut all the vegetables you can into pretty shapes; pour boiling water over them; drain them well and throw them into a jar of strong vinegar, and let them stand twenty-four hours; drain them again; strain your vinegar in which you have steeped your celery, mustard seed, pepper, ginger, or saffron through a cloth, pressing it hard, then filter it through a paper; add a bottle of sweet oil for every three quarts of vinegar; throw in your pickles, which must be carefully covered; expose your jar several days to the sun, and they will be fit for use.

To Prepare French Mustard. — Pound a quart of black mustard seed; mix with it equal parts of chopped parsley, chevril, celery, tarragon, garlic, allspice, and cloves, six pounded anchovies, and salt to taste; make this into a liquid paste, and let it stand three or four days; then strain it, and put it in little earthen jars; heat a little iron rod red-hot, and plunge it into each jar, and let it remain until it becomes cold; this is necessary to remove the bitterness and dampness of the mustard; fill in this hole with vinegar; cork and seal up your jars.

Pickled Lemons. — Scrape twelve lemons with a silver knife, cut them across in quarters, not quite through, give them as much salt as they will hold, also rub and strew it over them, and let them lie in an earthen dish three or four days, turning them every day; then take twelve cloves of garlic, parboil and salt them three days, a large spoonful of flour of mustard, and a pinch of cayenne to every lemon; take the lemons out of the salt, and put them into a jar with the spice, covering them with the best vinegar; cover the jar very closely. They will be fit for use in a month. Oranges may be pickled in the same way.

Pickled Mushrooms. — Take a quart of the best button mushrooms; wash them in vinegar with a flannel; then take three anchovies, bone, skin, and chop them small; then put them into a porcelain-lined saucepan with the mushrooms, a few blades of mace, a little pepper and ginger, a spoonful of salt, three cloves of shallots, and as much vinegar as will half cover them; stew until they shrink considerably; when cold put into bottles, pour the vinegar over them, and cork tightly.

Stuffed Mangoes d la Creole (Old Dominion style). — Gather the small green cantelopes when they are about as large as your fist; cut a little slice lengthwise out of each one, and take out all the seed; then put the slice back and tie your mango up carefully with a thread; throw your cantelopes in a strong brine, in which you throw, also, all manner of vegetables fit for pickles — cucumbers, ground artichokes, little ears of corn, snap beans, green tomatoes, asparagus points, etc.; leave them in this brine a month or six weeks; watch carefully to see that they do not become too soft; when you are ready to make your mangoes, take them out of the brine, and lay them two or three days in fresh water to remove the salt; make a stuffing of grated horseradish, white and black mustard seed and celery seed, ground mustard mixed with vinegar, green tomatoes, cucumbers, in fact any of the vegetables you have had in pickle. It is best to prepare your onions a day or two in advance; slice them and pack them in salt to draw out all the water, then lay them in cold water to take out the salt; chop them up with the stuffing, add a teaspoonful of turmeric, and mix all well together with sweet oil and powdered black pepper, and red-pepper pods, chopped; stuff your mangoes with this; be careful to sew in the slices you have taken out; pack them in a two-gallon stone jar, pour a quart bottle of sweet oil over them, and fill up the jar with the best vinegar; throw in a handful of allspice and cloves, and whole red pepper; put a weight on your pickles to keep them under; cover your jar with a cotton cloth dipped in melted beeswax and rosin; let them stand six weeks before using.

Ever-ready Pickle. — Three quarts of the best cider or malt vinegar; a quarter of a pound of ground mustard; half a pound of black peppercorns; two small red-pepper pods; one ounce of cloves, whole; a quarter of an ounce of allspice, whole; one ounce of brown sugar; a handful of salt; a stick of horseradish, grated.

Put all the ingredients in a porcelain-lined preservingkettle, put on the fire, and allow the pickle to come to a boil; remove from the fire and let the pickle cool; when quite cold pour into a stone crock, and add the vegetables, which must be wiped dry. The vegetables need no further preparation, and can be put in whenever they are in season; the jar should be kept closely covered.

Easy-mixed Pickle (Old Humphrey's). — Pack into medium-sized glass jars some freshly shredded cabbage, raw cauliflower cut up, button onions, peeled, small red-pepper pods, and small encumbers (which have lain in brine ready for pickling); sprinkle each layer with salt; add plenty of mustard seed, cloves, peppercorns, and a little allspice, all whole; then make a pickle as above, omitting, however, the spices, and putting half the quantity of salt; pour boiling hot, or as hot as the glass will bear, into the jars; cork and keep in a cool, dark place. They are fit for use in six weeks.

Pickled Onions (Meg Dodd's). — Take small button onions, peel them, and throw them into salt and water for twenty-four hours; then put them on the fire in a porcelain-lined preserving-kettle, with fresh salt and water, and let them come to a boil; remove from the fire, pour off the water, put the onions in a large crock, and pour over them the scalding hot vinegar, which must have been scalded with mace, whole peppercorns, red-pepper pods, spices (all unground), a tablespoonful of sugar, and salt to taste^ cover the crock and set away until cold, then bottle.

Picklette ("Common-Sense in the Household "). — Four large, crisp cabbage, chopped fine; one quart of button onions, chopped fine; two quarts of vinegar, or enough to cover the cabbage; two pounds of brown sugar; two tablespoonfuls of ground mustard; two tablespoonfuls of black pepper; two tablespoonfuls of cinnamon; two tablespoonfuls of turmeric; two tablespoonfuls of celery seed; one tablespoonf ul of allspice, one of mace, and one of alum, pulverized.

Pack the cabbage and onions in alternate layers with a little salt between them; let them stand twenty-four hours; then scald vinegar, sugar, and spices together, and pour over the cabbage and onions; repeat this for three successive mornings; on the fourth boil all together five minutes; when cold, bottle.

Tomato-and-Onion Pickle. — One peck of tomatoes, medium size, sliced thin; twenty-four shallots, chopped fine; a quarter of a pound of white mustard seed; four tablespoonfuls of ground ginger; three tablespoonfuls of mustard; one ounce of whole allspice; half an ounce of cloves; two tablespoonfuls of black pepper; two tablespoonfuls of loaf sugar.

When the tomatoes are sliced, pack them in an earthenware jar, putting a thick layer of salt between each layer of tomatoes; cover, and let them stand for twenty-four hours; then pour off the liquor, and put the tomatoes, onions, and spice into a large kettle in alternate layers; cover the pickle well with vinegar, put the cover on the kettle, and cook gently; let the pickle cook for three quarters of an hour after it has come to a boil; if the pickle seems too thick, add from a quarter of a pint to a pint of vinegar.

Tomato Mustard. — One peck of ripe tomatoes, peeled and sliced; six red-pepper pods; a quarter of a pound of salt; three tablespoonfuls of black pepper, whole; three tablespoonfuls of white sugar; one ounce of allspice, unground; half an ounce of mace, unground; half an ounce of cloves, unground; two onions, peeled and chopped fine.

Boil the tomatoes for an hour with the red-pepper pods; then strain through a colander, and add the other ingredients; put on the fire again, and boil until quite thick; strain again, and set away to cool; when quite cold stir in carefully, a little at a time, a quarter of a pound of the best mustard, one teaspoonful of cayenne pepper, and half a pint of vinegar; bottle, and keep in a cool, dark place.

Ripe-Tomato Pickle. — Two gallons of tomatoes, peeled and sliced; one pint of vinegar; two pounds of sugar; mace, cinnamon, and nutmeg to taste.

Put on all together, heat slowly to a boil, and simmer one hour; put up in glass jars.

Green-Tomato Soy. — Two gallons of tomatoes, peeled and sliced; one dozen of good-sized onions, sliced; two quarts of vinegar; one pound of sugar; two tablespoonf uls of salt; two tablespoon fuls of ground mustard; two black peppers, ground; one tablespoonful of allspice; one tablespoonful of cloves.

Mix all together and stew until tender, stirring often lest they should scorch; put up in small glass jars.

Pickled Peaches, Whole. — Ten pounds of fruit, pared; four and a half pounds of sugar, white loaf; one quart of vinegar; mace, cinnamon, and cloves to taste.

Lay the peaches in the sugar for an hour, drain off every drop of juice, and put over the fire with a cupful of water; boil until the scum ceases to rise; skim, put in the fruit, and boil five minutes; take out the peaches with a perforated skimmer, and spread upon dishes to cool; add the vinegar and spices to the syrup, boil fifteen minutes longer, and pour over the fruit in glass jars.

Pickled Peaches, Unpeeled. — Seven pounds of fruit; three pounds of sugar; three pints of vinegar; one tablespoonful each of allspice, mace, and cinnamon; one tablespoonful of celery seed; one tablespoonful of cloves.

Rub the fur off with a coarse cloth, and prick each peach with a fork; heat in just enough water to cover them until they almost boil, take them out, and add the vinegar, sugar, and spices to the water; boil ten minutes, then put in the fruit and boil until tender; remove the fruit with a skimmer, and spread upon dishes to cool; boil the syrup until thick, pack the peaches in glass jars, and pour over them scalding hot. Uupeeled pears may be pickled in the same manner.

Pickled Cherries. — Take large, tart, red cherries, as fresh as you can get them; to every quart of cherries allow a large cupful of vinegar, two tablespoonfuls of sugar, a dozen whole cloves, and half a dozen blades of mace; put the vinegar and sugar on to heat with the spices; boil five minutes, turn out into a covered stoneware vessel, cover, and let it get perfectly cold; pack the cherries into jars, and pour the vinegar over them when cold; cork tightly and set away; they are fit for use almost immediately.

Sweet Tomato Pickle. — Seven pounds of ripe tomatoes, peeled and sliced; three and a half pounds of sugar; one ounce of mixed mace and cinnamon; one ounce of cloves; one quart of vinegar.

Mix all together, and stew one hour.

Sweet Pickled Damsons, Plums, Pears, Peaches, or Husk Tomatoes. — Pare peaches and pears, prick plums and damsons, or husk tomatoes; put into a porcelain-lined kettle with alternate layers of sugar; heat slowly to a boil; add the vinegar and spices; boil five minutes; then take out the fruit with a perforated skimmer, and spread upon dishes to cool; boil the syrup thick, pack the fruit in glass jars, and pour the syrup on boiling hot. To seven pounds of fruit allow four pounds of white sugar, one pint of strong vinegar, mace, cinnamon, and cloves to taste. Always use whole spices for sweet pickle. Examine sweet pickle every other day for the first month, and if they do not keep well, set the uncovered jars in a kettle of boiling water, and heat the pickles to scalding-point.

ICE-CREAM AND WATER-ICES.

GENERAL RULES FOR ICE-CREAM MAKING.

Good ice-cream should be made of pure cream. If this be unattainable, thicken the milk with arrow-root or corn-starch; or make a custard (not too thick,and freeze it).

The best ice cream is made of the best, rich, undiluted cream, and the best sugar. Three quarters of a pound of sugar to a quart of cream is the average.

Pack the freezer in lumps of ice and rock salt. Never allow the salt to come up to the level of the freezer, lest it should get into the cream. After the cream has been in long enough to become completely chilled, turn the can rapidly to and fro. From time to time remove the top, and beat and stir the cream vigorously with a long wooden paddle, scraping it off the sides; pursue this course until the cream becomes thick; when too stiff to beat or stir, cover the can securely to keep out the salt, and fill the top with broken ice.

These directions apply to the old-fashioned freezer. But it is better to get always the latest invention. The present freezers beat, stir, scrape, and freeze, all at once, well and quickly.

Almond Ice-cream. — Three pints of fresh, rich cream; sugar to taste; one tablespoonful of corn-starch, wet with cold water; three ounces of sweet almonds, and one ounce of bitter, blanched and pounded to a paste; two tablespoonfuls of orange-flower water.

Heat one pint of the cream almost to boiling, add the sugar, and, when this is melted, the almonds; simmer ten minutes, remove from the fire, and let it all stand ten minutes in a covered jar; strain, return to the fire, and stir in the arrow-root for five minutes; when cold, beat light with an egg-whip, adding gradually the rest of the cream; then freeze.

Custard Ice-cream. — Make a rich custard, flavor to taste; make it sweeter than usual, and freeze.

Pistachio Ice-cream. — Make a pistachio custard, sweeter than usual, and freeze.

Caramel Ice-cream. — Make a caramel custard, very sweet, and freeze.

Nesselrode Ice-cream. — Is made precisely according to the receipt for Nesselrode cream d la Russe, but with one third more sugar, and frozen.

Chocolate Ice-cream. — Two quarts of sweet cream ; half a pint of milk; sugar to taste; one third of a cake of chocolate, grated; a little vanilla.

Beat the cream until stiff, then add the milk, sugar, flavoring, and chocolate; then beat again hard and long, and freeze, stirring until so hard that you can do so no longer; the more rapidly it is stirred the finer will be its grain.

Coffee in Cream. — Three pints of cream ; one cupful of' black coffee, very strong and clear; two cups uls of sugar; two tablespoonfuls of arrow-root moistened with cold milk.

Heat one half the cream to boiling, then stir in the sugar, and, when this is nearly melted, the coffee, then the arrow-root; boil five minutes, stirring constantly; when cold, whip as light as possible, whipping in the rest of the cream by degrees; then freeze.

Ice-cream made of Milk. — Two quarts of good, rich, fresh milk; two tablespoonfuls of corn flour; sugar to taste; flavoring to taste.

Mix the corn flour to a smooth paste with a little of the milk, then stir in half a pint of boiling milk; set this on the fire, and let the flour cook a little while; when done, dilute with cold milk, stir until smooth, strain through a fine sieve, sweeten and flavor to taste, and freeze.

Tutti-frutti Ice-cream. — Make a very rich custard — a caramel custard is best for the purpose, following the usual rule of making it one third sweeter than if it were not to be frozen — and stir in some candied fruit, chopped fine, regulating the quantity by the quantity of custard; freeze as usual.

Pineapple Ice-cream. — Three quarts of rich, fresh cream; one pineapple ; sugar to taste ; a very little candied pineapple cut into thin shreds.

Cut the pineapple into quarters, but do not peel it; take each quarter by the skin, and grate it down to a fine pulp; then press out the juice, mix it with the sweetened cream, add also a little of the pulp and the candied pineapple, sweeten again to taste, beat and stir smooth, and freeze.

Lemon Ice-cream. — Grate the rinds into a bowl, and put a tablespoonful or two of water upon the pulp; stir and mash it well, then strain it into the cream; then squeeze the lemons, and add a portion of the sugar to the juice, and stir it into the cream; one lemon suffices for each quart of cream; sugar to taste.

Orange-Fool Ice-cream. — Make a cream as for orange fool, but sweeter, and freeze.

Vanilla Ice-cream. — Cut the bean into small pieces, and boil it in half a teacupful of water until the flavor is extracted; then strain the water into the already sweetened cream, and mix it well; flavor, and sweeten to taste.

Racahout Ice-cream. — Rub the racahout smooth in a little cold water, stir it into one half of the cream, and boil it, stirring constantly; then stir into it the remainder of the cream, sweeten to taste, and allow a tablespoonf ul of racahout to each quart of cream; freeze as usual.

Strawberry Ice-cream. — Two quarts of rich, fresh cream; juice of one quart of fresh strawberries; sugar to taste.

Sweeten the cream, put it into the freezing-can, then mash the strawberries through a coarse sieve, strain the juice thus obtained through a finer sieve, and stir the juice into the cream; taste, and, if not sweet enough, stir in more sugar.

Raspberry Ice-cream. — Is made in the same manner as strawberry.

Peach Ice-cream. — Use rich, fresh cream, and the finest and ripest peaches; when the cream is sweetened, the peaches should be mashed into a pulp, sweetened, and stirred into the cream; the quantity of peach is a matter of taste.

Crime au The (Cuisiniere Parisienne). — Boil a quart of rich, fresh cream, and pour boiling hot upon a dessertspoonful of tea (half black and half green) and upon a doublehandful of loaf sugar; cover closely, set in a warm place, and, when the tea has drawn, strain the cream and beat into it the yolks of five eggs; sweeten again to taste, beat smooth, and freeze.

Crime a la Rose (Cuisiniere Parisienne). — Two quarts of rich, fresh cream; sugar to taste; rose water to taste; cochineal in sufficient quantity to give a fine rose-color; yolks of twelve eggs.

Heat the cream boiling hot, stir in the sugar, flavoring, and coloring; have ready the yolks well beaten; add the cream to the yolks, little by little, stirring continually; strain, cook d bain-marie until it thickens, and, when cold, freeze.

Cherry Ice. — One quart of cherries, and one half the stones, pounded; the juice of two lemons; onepint of water; sugar to taste, dissolved in the water; one claretglassful of finest brandy.

Squeeze out the bruised cherries and stones over the sugar, add the water, then the brandy; stir, beat, and freeze.

Currant and Raspberry Ice. — One quart of red currants; one pint of water; one pint of red raspberries; one and a half pounds of loaf sugar.

Squeeze out the juice, mix in the sugar and water, and freeze.

Champagne Water-ice. — Rasp six lemons on a piece of sugar, and squeeze the lemon juice into a basin; make it very sweet, then add a bottle of champagne; dilute it with water, but do not make it too weak; put it into a freezer, and freeze like ice-cream, beating and stirring to make it smooth.

Roman Punch. — One gallon of water; one pint of champagne; half a pint of French brandy; one pint of old rum; juice of two lemons; rind of four lemons,rubbed on sugar.

Sweeten to taste; if weak, add more brandy; freeze as usual.

Concord Frozen Punch. — Squeeze the juice of six lemons into three quarts of water; to each quart of water add three quarters of a pound of loaf sugar; beat the whites of four eggs very light, and stir them into the lemonade; then add a wineglassful of the best brandy and a wineglassful of the best Jamaica rum to each quart of water; freeze as you freeze ice-cream.

Lemon Water-ice. — Juice of six lemons to each quart of water; the rind of the lemon grated and steeped in a little water; the water strained, and a little of this added to the juice, improves the flavor; sugar to taste, always bearing in mind that freezing diminishes the strength of sugar, and that water requires more sugar than either cream or milk; then heat, stir, and freeze as for ice-cream.

Orange Water-ice. — Make precisely as above.

Strawberry, Raspberry, and Pineapple Water-ice. — Sweeten the water, put it into the freezing-can, then mash and stir the berries, or grate the pineapple; press the juice out through muslin, add to the water in the can, sweeten again to taste, and freeze; allow a quart and a half of berries to each quart of water, and a large pineapple to two quarts.

Genuine Italian Tutti-frutti Ice. — Take a large form for ice-cream; have ready as great a variety of ripe fruit as possible, watermelon included; seed the watermelon, cut it into lozenges or squares; put a layer of it into the form, sugaring it well with granulated sugar; then a layer of varied fruit; sugar abundantly, and proceed in this way until the form is packed full of fruit and sugar; cover it, set in bain-marie just long enough for the sugar to dissolve and the juices to be started; then let it cool, and, when cold, freeze. This is delicious, and is the genuine tutti-frutti.

Vanilla Sugar. — One pound of lump sugar, and one ounce of Mexican vanilla beans.

Cut the beans in small pieces, and pound in a mortar with the sugar until fine as flour; sift through a fine strainer, pound the remainder again, and sift until all is fine; keep in a tightly corked bottle; use a tablespoonful for a quart of ice-cream.

TEA, COFFEE, AND MADE DRINKS.

Tea. — One teaspoonful for each person, and one for the pot; Scald the teapot well, put in the tea, cover the pot closely, and set by the fire for ten minutes or more in order to heat the leaves; pour on them just enough boiling water to cover the tea, cover the pot closely, and let it stand five minutes longer. Then fill up and serve.

A more economical method is to boil the tea for a minute, not more; half the quantity of tea leaves will then suffice.

Coffee (Soyer). — Put one ounce of ground coffee in a pan, which place over the fire; keep stirring until quite hot, but take care that it does not burn; then pour over it quickly one quart of boiling water, close it immediately, keep it near the fire, and fill your cup without shaking the grounds.

Or, have the coffee-pot heated, put the hot coffee into a strainer fitted into the coffee-pot, pour over the boiling water, and serve at once. Coffee so made is delicious.

Russian Tea. — Is made like ordinary tea, but served in small glasses, with thin slices of lemon floating in them. It is to be sugared to taste, and may be taken hot or icecold.

Cambric Tea. — One pint of fresh milk, and the same of boiling water; sweeten to taste.

Cocoa Nihs. — One quart of boiling water; two ounces of cocoa nibs; one quart of fresh milk.

Wet the nibs with a little cold water, add to the boiling water, cook one hour and a half, strain, add the milk, heat to boiling, and take from the fire.

Prepared Cocoa. — One quart of boiling water; two ounces of prepared cocoa; one quart of milk.

Make as you do chocolate, only boil nearly an hour before you add the milk, afterwards heating almost to boiling; sweeten to taste.

Revolenta. — Cook as you do racahout. It can be bought at any pharmacy.

Cafe, Om Lait. — One pint of strong-made coffee, hot; one pint of boiling milk. Mix both boiling hot.

Arab Racahout. — One pound of ground rice; one pound of arrow-root; half a pound of the best chocolate, ground fine.

Mix thoroughly, and keep in a jar for use; take a tablespoonful of racahout, and make into a paste with cold water or milk; stir this paste into half a pint of boiling milk, and let it boil up for a minute or two; add sugar, if desired, and take hot like chocolate.

Chocolate. — Six tablespoonfuls of grated chocolate to each pint of water; an equal quantity of milk; sweeten to taste.

Put on the water boiling hot; rub the chocolate smooth in a little cold water, and stir into the boiling water; boil twenty minutes, add the milk, and boil ten minutes more, stirring frequently; froth with a little milling-machine just before you serve.

Vienna Coffee. — The secret of preparing Vienna coffee consists in roasting and grinding fresh coffee every time it is used, then in making it in a Vienna coffee machine, in the regular way, and, lastly, in heating up with it fresh, rich cream already whipped light.

Almond Milk. — Three dozen fresh almonds, blanched, and pounded to paste; two bitter almonds, blanched, and pounded to paste; two lumps of loaf sugar; one pint of water.

Mix one gill of boiling water with the almonds when you have pounded them in a mortar; strain, return to the mortar, and pound with more water until you have used a pint in all; sweeten to taste. A delicious beverage, but it does not keep long.

Eggnogg. — One tumblerful of cream and milk, half and half; one tablespoonful of Jamaica rum; one tablespoonful of brandy; one tablespoonful of powdered sugar.

Beat the yolks of the eggs very light — first with the sugar, then with the whites, which must previously have been beaten light; add, by degrees, the spirits and brandy, stirring all the time; lastly, add the milk and cream, and grate nutmeg over the top.

Fresh-milk Punch. — One glassful of rich, fresh milk; loaf sugar to taste; one or two tablespoonf uls of the best brandy. Mix and stir well, and grate nutmeg on top.

Lemonade. — Three dozen lemons; four pounds of sugar; the rind of two lemons shaved thin.

Mix and stir well together, and add water and pounded ice in proportion. This quantity is for a large party.

Orangeade. — Three dozen sour oranges; two pounds of loaf sugar; the peel of two oranges shaved thin. Mix, and add water and ice as above.

Claret Punch. — One bottle of claret; a quarter of the quantity of ice-water; two lemons sliced fine; half a teacupful of powdered sugar; half a teacupful of grated pineapple; half a teacupf ul of ripe strawberries mashed fine; one tablespoonful of brandy.

Mix all the fruit together, then the sugar, then the claret, lastly the ice-water; put a large lump of ice in the bowl, and pounded ice in the glasses.

Regent's Punch. — One pound of rock candy; one large cupful of strong black tea (made); three wineglassfuls of brandy; three wineglassfuls of rum; one bottle of champagne; two oranges, the juice only; three lemons, the juice only; one large lump of ice.

Roman Punch. — Three coffeecupfuls of lemonade, strong and sweet; one glassful of champagne; one glassful of rum; two oranges, the juice only; two eggs, whites only, well whipped; half a pound of powdered sugar beaten into the whipped whites.

It is best always to freeze a Roman punch.

Mulled Cider. — One quart of cider; eight eggs; a few grains of allspice.

If the cider is hard reduce it with water, and put it to boil with the allspice; meanwhile beat the eggs light in a large pitcher, pour the cider on the eggs, and pour from one pitcher to another until it has a fine froth on it; grate a little nutmeg on each glass as it is poured out.

Beer Flip. — Put as much ale, porter, or beer as you require into a tin can, and sweeten to taste; heat the thick end of a poker, or any other piece of iron that is clean and convenient, red-hot, and stir the mixture with it until it ceases to bubble; drink it hot.

Sangaree. — One glassful of port wine; one tablespoonful of powdered sugar; half a pint of porter; grated nutmeg to taste.

Sherry Cobbler. — One gill of sherry wine; one tablespoonful of pulverized sugar.

Add a small quantity of any fruit in season, such as a small slice of pineapple, a few strawberries or cherries, or half a ripe peach; then fill up the tumbler with small pieces of ice; invert an empty tumbler of exactly the same size and put the rims together; then shake hard and long, and fill up the tumbler with more ice, beaten to the size of hailstones; drink through a straw. If you use champagne, use less sugar.

Fruit Sherbets. — Mash any ripe fruit, and pass it first through a coarse, then through a fine, sieve; to every quart of juice add a quart of water, and sweeten with powdered sugar; when the sugar is dissolved strain again, and keep in the refrigerator until wanted.

Mulled Wine. — One pint of Madeira wine; one pint of hot water; the yolks of six eggs beaten very light; a teacupful of sweet cream; sugar and spice to taste.

Boil the wine and water quickly, take it from the fire, and stir in the eggs, sugar, spices, and cream.

Spiced Wine (Florentine fashion). — One pint of ordinary red wine; one pint of hot water; stick cinnamon to taste; one grated nutmeg; cloves and other spices to taste; sugar to taste; a quarter of an ounce of candied orange peel, snipped fine.

Boil the wine and water as above, take it from the fire, stir in the sugar, spices, and orange peel, and return it to the fire, stirring all the time; allow it to boil up once, and then strain and serve. Strips of toast should be served with it.

DIETARY FOR INFANTS AND INVALIDS.

Food for Infants, No. 1. — Cut thin slices of bread into a basin; cover the bread with cold water; place it in the oven for two hours to bake; take it out; beat the bread up with a fork, and slightly sweeten it.

Food for Infants, No. 2. — Boil the crumbs of white bread for two hours in water, taking care that it does not burn; then add milk; allow it to boil up once, and sweeten to taste.

Food for Infants, No. 3. — Take a pound of sifted white flour; put it in a cloth, tie it tightly, and let it boil for four or five hours; then take off the cloth; peel off the outer rind; the inside will be found quite dry, which grate, and mix with boiled milk when required.

Food for Infants, No. 4. — Bake some fine white sifted flour in a slow oven until it is of a delicate fawn color. This preparation of flour, made into gruel, is an excellent food for an infant.

Food for Infants, No. 5. — Crumb some bread on a plate; dry it near the fire, then roll fine, and pass through a sieve; then put it in a slow oven, and bake until of a light fawn color; make into gruel.

Food for Infants, No. 6. — Two parts of baked flour; one part of prepared oatmeal.

Mix thoroughly, and sift; one tablespoonful of this, mixed with a quarter of a pint of milk, or milk and water, when well boiled and sweetened with white sugar, makes a thick, nourishing, and delicious food for infants and invalids.

Food for Infants, No. 7. — Farinaceous food for infants, prepared by Herds, of Dartford, England — sold in pharmacies and druggists' shops; one tablespoonf ul to a quarter of a pint of milk, or milk and water, and well boiled; if found too constipating, let it be mixed with equal parts of Robertson's patent groats.

Food for Infants, No. 8. — Soak for an hour some rice in cold water; strain, and add fresh water; then let it simmer until it will pulp through a sieve; put the pulp and the water into a saucepan, with a lump or two of sugar, and again let it simmer for a quarter of an hour; a portion of this to be mixed with one third of fresh milk, so as to make it of the consistency of good cream.

Food for Infants, No. 9. — Excellent for relaxed bowels. Into five large spoonfuls of the purest filtered water rub smooth one dessertspoonful of fine flour; set over the tire five spoonfuls of new milk, and put two bits of lump sugar into it; the moment it boils, pour it into the flour and water, and stir over a slow fire twenty minutes.

Food for Infants, No. 10. — In cases of great emaciation genuine arrow-root (to be bought at first-class druggists') is an excellent food; it should be made with fresh milk, and sweetened with loaf sugar; a small pinch of table salt should be added.

Flour Ball (for teething children). — One cupful of flour tied in a stout muslin bag, and dropped into cold water, then set over the fire; boil three hours steadily; turn out the flour ball, and dry in the hot sun all day, or, if you need it at once, dry in a moderate oven without shutting the door.

To cook it, grate one tablespoonful of the flour for a cupful of boiling milk and water; wet the flour with a little cold water, stir in, and boil five minutes; add a pinch of salt.

Bread and Milk. — Two tablespoonfuls of stale bread crumbled finely; half a cupful of boiling milk; a pinch of sugar.

Milk Porridge. — One tablespoonful of Indian meal, moistened with cold water; one tablespoonful of white flour, also mixed with cold water; two cupfuls of boiling water; two cupfuls of boiling milk; a pinch of salt.

Boil the paste in the hot water twenty minutes, add the milk, and boil ten minutes more, stirring often.

Mush and Milk. — One cupful of Indian meal, wet with cold water; two quarts of cold water; salt to taste.

Boil two hours, stirring often with a wooden spoon; eat hot with milk and sugar.

Hominy and Milk. — Half a cupf u^ of small hominy; one scant quart of cold water; a pinch of salt.

Boil one hour, stirring often; mix in new milk, and sweeten while hot. This, is a good food to correct constipation.

Hecker's Farina (or Semolina) and Milk. — One cupful of boiling water; one cupful of fresh milk; one large tablespoonful of Hecker's farina, moistened with cold water; two teaspoonfuls of white sugar; a pinch of salt.

Stir the farina into the boiling water (salted) in the bainmarie, or farina kettle; i. e., one boiler set in another full of hot water; boil fifteen minutes, stirring constantly until it is well thickened; then add the milk, stirring it gradually, and boil fifteen minutes longer; sweeten to taste. This is a digestible, palatable, and nourishing food for children.

Wheaten Grits and Milk. — Four tablespoonf uls of grits (cracked wheat) soaked in cold water an hour; one quart of boiling water; one cupful of milk; one pinch of salt.

Boil the soaked grits in the water an hour, stirring constantly; add the milk and boil half an hour longer; sweeten to taste, and eat with cream. Good for constipation in children over a year old.

Arrow-root and Milk. — One cupful of boiling water; one cupful of fresh milk; two teaspoonfuls of best Bermuda arrow-root, wet with cold water; one pinch of salt; two teaspoonfuls of white sugar, dissolved in the milk.

Stir the arrow-root paste into the boiling water, stir and boil until clear; add the sweetened milk, and boil ten minutes, slowly stirring. You may omit the milk if necessary.

Barley Bouillie. — Two cupfuls of boiling water; two tablespoonf uls of prepared barley, wet with cold water; one pinch of salt; two teaspoonfuls of white sugar.

Make as above. It can also be made with milk. This is astringent.

Graham Hasty Pudding. — One cupful of Graham flour, wet with cold water; one cupful of milk; one cupful of boiling water; one pinch of salt.

Stir the wet flour into the boiling water; boil ten minutes, stirring constantly; add the milk and cook, after it has come to a boil, ten minutes; eat with sugar and milk, or nutmeg, cream, and sugar.

Rice-flour Hasty Pudding. — Make as above, but with rice flour.

Panada, No. 1. — One ounce of bread crumbs; one blade of mace; one pint of water.

Boil, without stirring, till they mix and turn smooth, then add 'a grate of nutmeg, a small piece of butter, a tablespoonful of sherry, and sugar to taste.

Panada, No. 2. — Six hard biscuits split; two tablespoonfuls of white sugar; a pinch of salt; a little grated nutmeg; boiling water, enough to cover them.

Split the biscuits, and pile in a bowl in layers, salt and sugar scattered among them; cover with boiling water, and set on the hearth, with a close top over the bowl, for at least one hour; the biscuits should be as clear and soft as jelly, but not broken; eat from the bowl.

Porridge. — Two tablespoonfuls of coarsely ground oatmeal, mixed smoothly with a small teacupf ul of cold water; one pint of boiling water poured on; boil and stir for forty minutes; eat with milk.

Oatmeal Flummery. — Crushed Embden grits in any proportion required; put into a broad pan, cover with water, stir up together and let stand thirty-six hours, changing the water, and stirring up the oatmeal, however, every twelve hours; then strain through a hair sieve, and boil, stirring vigorously until it is quite thick; pour it to cool into a dish, and eat cold with milk, or wine and sugar.

Rice Milk (Gouffe'). — Two and a half ounces of best Carolina rice blanched in plenty of water; three pints of milk boiled in a two-quart stewpan.

Cool the rice with plenty of cold water, and drain; then mix the rice in the milk, and stir on the fire till boiling; add a quarter of an ounce of sugar, and the same of salt; boil for an hour; serve.

Other milk soups, such as vermicelli, farina, tapioca, etc., are prepared in the same way.

Rice, Boiled. — Half a cupful of whole rice boiled in just enough water to cover it; one cupful of milk; a little salt; one egg beaten light.

When the rice is nearly done, turn off the water, add the milk, and simmer, taking care that it does not scorch, until the milk boils up well; salt, and beat in the egg; eat warm, with cream, sugar, and nutmeg.

Biscuit and Milk. — One hard sailor's biscuit, soaked eight hours in milk; pour off what milk is not absorbed, and mix it up in a pint of new milk.

Rice Pudding. — Two ounces of rice; one pint of milk.

Boil the rice in the milk, stirring until it thickens; take it off and mix in well two ounces of butter, a quarter of a nutmeg, grated, and a moderate quantity of sugar; pour into a buttered dish and bake.

Batter Pudding. — Three teaspoonfuls of flour; one pint of milk; a pinch of salt; of powdered ginger, nutmeg, and tincture of saffron, each a teaspoonful.

Boil and serve with powdered sugar.

Unleavened Biscuit. — Mix good, dry, sifted flour with milk; salt, and roll out thin as letter-paper; cut into round cakes, and bake quickly. They may also be mixed with water.

Arrow-root Blanc-mange. — One cupful of boiling milk; two dessertspoonfuls of best arrow-root rubbed smooth in cold water; two teaspoonfuls of white sugar; flavor to taste.

Boil until it thickens well, stirring all the while; eat cold with cream.

Tapioca Blanc-mange. — One cupful of tapioca, washed well, soaked in water four hours; three cupfuls of boiling milk; three tablespoonf uls of white sugar; flavor to taste.

When soaked, stir the tapioca, with the water in which it was soaked, into the boiling milk; sweeten and boil slowly, stirring constantly; take off, flavor, and pour into moulds.

Sea-moss Blanc-mange. — Is made as you make sea-moss jelly, using boiling milk instead of water, and leaving out the lemons and wine.

Beefsteak, or Mutton Chops, Broiled. — Choose the tenderest cuts, and broil carefully over a clear, fierce fire; salt and pepper (if agreeable to the invalid); lay between two hot plates three minutes, and serve.

Cold Beef Tea. — Half a pound of fine lean beef cut into small pieces; half a pint of cold spring water.

Pour the water on the beef, and add one teaspoonful of diluted hydrochloric acid; let it stand four hours, strain through a sieve, and keep in a cold place; the whole process must be cold ; never warm it; take a wineglassful three times a day; a little wine can be added. This is sustaining and digestible, when all the other beef teas fail.

Whole-Beef Tea. — For every pint of beef tea required take half a pound of fresh-killed beef, and remove all fat, sinew, veins, and bone; let it be cut up into pieces under half an inch square, and soak for twelve hours in one third of the water; let it then be taken out, and simmered for two hours in the remaining two thirds of the water, the quantity lost by evaporation being replaced from time to time; the boiling liquor is then to be poured on the cold liquor in which the meat was soaked; the solid meat is to be dried, pounded in a mortar, freed from all stringy parts, and mixed with the rest.

When the beef tea is made daily it is convenient to use one day's boiled meat for the next day's tea, as thus it has time to dry, and is easier pounded. If agreeable to the invalid, a piece of green celery stalk or a small onion, a piece of fresh tomato or a few cloves, may be boiled in the beef tea.

Quick Beef Tea. — To each pound of minced raw beef, one pint of water; stir up cold, and let it stand one hour; then heat d bain-marie up to 180� Fahrenheit for another hour over a slow fire; strain, skim, and flavor at discretion.

Beef-and-Hen Broth. — One pound of lean beef; half a hen, boned ; pound together in a mortar, add a quarter of an ounce of salt; put in a stewpan with two and a half pints of water, and stir over the fire till boiling; then add carrots, onions, and celery at discretion; boil for half an hour, strain, and serve.

Nutrient Beef Enema (in cases where the stomach rejects food). — Half a pint of good beef tea, thiokened with a teaspoonf ul of tapioca.

Or, reduce one and three quarter ounces of raw beef to a fine pulp, pass it through a fine colander, and mix the whole up with twenty grains of acid pepsine (Wow. douttfs Poudre Digestive), and four grains of diastase, or a dessertspoonful of malt flour. It should have a bright rose tint, and a rich, meaty odor; not more than a quarter of a pint should be given at once, and that slowly.

Eel Broth. — Skin, clean, and chop into small pieces six small eels; boil in a pint and a half of water, skim, and then cover and stew for forty minutes; season, strain, and serve.

Beef-amd-Sago Broth. — Two pounds of lean beef cut into dice; one cupful of sago soaked soft in a little lukewarm water; two quarts of water; yolks of three eggs; salt to taste.

Stew the beef to rags, strain, salt, and stir in the sage ; simmer gently one hour, stirring often; add the beaten yolks, boil up well, and serve.

Beef Tea. — One pound of lean beef cut into dice; put into a jar without a drop of water, cover tightly, and set in a pot of cold water; heat gradually to a boil, and continue this steadily for three or four hours.

Pennington's Old Virginia Beef-Tea Tonic. — One pound of lean, juicy beef; half a pint of cold water; half a pint of old bourbon whiskey.

Cut the beef into pieces about half an inch square; pour over it half a pint of cold water, cover, and let it stand twelve hours; then add half a pint of old bourbon whiskey, and let it stand six hours; then strain three or four times until quite clear; keep (closely covered) in a cool place, and take a small wineglassful two or three times a day. This is a capital tonic.

Calf's-feet Broth. — Two calf' s feet; two quarts of cold water; one egg, beaten up with two tablespoonf uls of milk for each cupful of broth; pepper (white) and salt to taste.

Boil the feet to shreds, strain through a thick muslin bag, season, and set by for use, warming up as you need it, and adding to each cupful a beaten egg and two tablespoonfuls of milk; boil up once with these a teaspoonful of wine; or a little lemon juice may be added if agreeable to the patient.

Chicken Jelly (" Common-Sense in the Household "). — Half a raw chicken pounded with a mallet, bones and meat; a quart of cold water; heat slowly in a covered jar until the meat is like white rags, and the liquid reduced to one half; strain and press through a sieve and coarse cloth; salt to taste, return to the fire, and simmer five minutes longer; when cold, skim; keep on the ice, and serve cold with unleavened wafers, or make into sandwiches with thin bread and butter.

Mutton Broth, No. 1. — Lean loin of mutton, one pound, exclusive of bone; three pints of water.

Boil gently until tender, throwing in a little salt and onion to taste; pour the broth into a basin, and, when cold, skim off the fat; warm up as wanted; if barley or rice are added, they must be boiled separately until soft, and added when the broth is heated for use.

Mutton Broth, No. 2. — One pound of lean mutton, cut into dice; one quart of cold water; one tablespoonful of rice (soaked in warm water); four tablespoonfuls of milk; salt, and a little chopped parsley; boil the meat, unsalted, in the water, keeping it closely covered until it falls to pieces; strain, add the. barley and rice, simmer half an hour, stirring often; stir in the seasoning and milk, simmer five minutes, and serve hot.

Chicken Broth, No. 1. — Skin, and chop up fine, a small chicken or half a large fowl, and boil it, bones and all, with a blade of mace, a sprig of parsley, and a crust of bread, in a quart of water for an hour, skimming it from time to time; strain, season, and serve. Chicken broth poured on sippets laid on the bottom of the dish makes a good sauce for boiled chicken or partridge, when the invalid is well enough to be allowed solid food.

Chicken Broth, No. 2. — Make exactly as you do mutton broth, cracking the bones well.

Veal-and-Sago Broth. — Two pounds of knuckle of veal cracked all to pieces; two quarts of cold water; two tablespoonfuls of best pearl sago soaked in a cupful of water; one cupful of cream heated to boiling; yolks of two eggs beaten light.

Boil the veal water in a covered saucepan very slowly until reduced to one quart of liquid; strain, season with salt, and stir in the soaked sago, having previously warmed it by setting it half an hour in a saucepan of boiling water, and stirring it; simmer half an hour, taking care it does not burn; beat in the cream and eggs, boil up, and serve.

Arrow-root Custard. — Two cupfuls of boiling milk; three heaping teaspoonfuls of arrow-root moistened with a little cold milk; two tablespoonfuls of white sugar beaten with the egg; one egg, well beaten.

Mix the arrow-root paste with the boiling milk, stir three minutes, take from the fire, and whip in the egg and sugar; boil two minutes longer, flavor to taste, and pour into moulds.

Rice-flour Milk. — Two cupfuls of boiling milk; two tablespoonfuls of rice flour wet with cold water; two tablespoonfuls of white sugar.

Boil ten minutes, stirring all the while, and flavor to taste.

Sago Milk. — Three tablespoonfuls of sago, soaked in a large cupful of water one hour; three cupfuls of boiling milk; sweeten and flavor to taste.

Simmer half an hour.

Tapioca Milk. — Is made in the same way.

Water Gruel. — One large tablespoonful of oatmeal mixed to a paste with cold water. Pour on, stirring all the time, a pint of boiling water; boil for ten minutes, stirring steadily, and strain; eat with salt or sugar.

Children's Gruel. — Half an ounce of grits; two thirds of a pint of water; one third of a pint of milk; half an ounce of sugar.

Mix and cook as above.

Rice Gruel (somewhat astringent, in cases of diarrhea). — Two ounces of ground rice; a quarter of an ounce of cinnamon; four pints of water.

Boil for forty minutes, then add a tablespoonful of orange marmalade.

Sago Gruel. — Two tablespoonfuls of sago; three tablespoonfuls of white sugar; one wineglassf ul of white wine; two cupfuls of water; one tablespoonful of lemon juice; nutmeg to taste; a pinch of salt.

Put the sago in the water while cold, and warm by setting in a saucepan of boiling water; stir often, and let it soften and heat for one hour; then boil ten minutes, stirring all the time, and add the seasoning.

Or, you may omit the wine and lemon, and eat the sago with a little cream.

Milk-and-Rice-flour Gruel (astringent). — Two heaping tablespoonf uls of rice flour wet with cold milk; one quart of boiling milk; one saltspoonf ul of salt.

Stir in the rice paste, and boil ten minutes, stirring all the while; season with sugar and nutmeg, and eat warm with cream.

White Indian-meal Gruel. — Make as above, but boil half an hour.

Indian-meal Gruel. — One cupful of Indian meal, sifted; two quarts of boiling water; a pinch of salt.

Wet the meal to a smooth paste, and stir into the boiling water; boil slowly half an hour, stirring constantly from the bottom. A handful of Sultana raisins, stoned, is an improvement to this gruel if the patient can digest them.

Tapioca Jelly. — One cupful of tapioca; three cupfuls of cold water; the juice of a lemon, and a pinch of the grated peel; sugar to taste.

Soak the tapioca in water four hours; set within a saucepan of boiling water, and heat, stirring frequently; if too thick, add a little boiling water as it begins to clear; when clear, strain through coarse lace and add the sugar — or, better still, rock candy — and the lemon; pour into moulds, and eat with cream flavored and sweetened to taste.

Arrow-root Jelly. — One cupful of boiling water; two heaping teaspoonfuls of the best Bermuda arrow-root; two teaspoonf uls of white sugar.

Wet the arrow-root in a little cold water, and rub smooth; then stir into the already boiling water, in which the sugar must first have been melted; stir till clear, boiling steadily, and add the flavoring.

Arrow-root Wine Jelly. — Make as above, but add one tablespoonful of burned brandy or three tablespoonfuls of burned sherry.

Iceland or Irish Moss Jelly. — One handful of moss, washed in five waters, and soaked an hour; one quart of boiling water; two lemons (or oranges), the juice only; a pinch of cinnamon; sugar to taste — rock candy is better.

Soak the washed moss in a very little cold water; stir into the boiling, and simmer until dissolved; sweeten, flavor, and strain into moulds. Wine may be added if desired.

Rice Jelly (excellent for children with weak bowels). — Half a cupful of whole rice, well washed, and soaked two hours in a little warm water; then add to the rice and water in the kettle three pints of cold water; one small pinch of salt put in the cold water; sweeten to taste with rock candy when strained; strain through double tarlatan.

Isinglass Jelly. — One ounce of isinglass; twelve cloves; two ounces of rock candy; one quart of water.

Boil the isinglass and cloves in the water down to a pint; strain hot through a flannel bag on the rock candy, and flavor with angelica root, or two or three tablespoonf uls of liqueur de la grande Chartreuse if gloves are not relished.

Hartshorn or Ivory Jelly. — Half a pound of hartshorn shavings (not raspings, which are adulterated); three pints of water; three ounces of white sugar candy; one ounce of lemon juice.

Boil the shavings in the water down to a pint, strain on the sugar candy, and add the lemon juice; heat up again to boiling-point. Ivory jelly may be made in the same way, substituting ivory for hartshorn shavings.

Bread Jelly. — Pare some slices of stale white bread, and toast them to an even light brown; pile in a bowl, sprinkling sugar and a little salt between; cover well with boiling water, fit on a tight lid, and set in a pan of boiling water; simmer gently until the contents are like jelly; eat warm with powdered sugar and nutmeg.

Dry Toast. — Pare off the crust from stale light bread, slice half an inch thick, and toast quickly on both sides; serve hot.

Milk Toast. — Toast as above; dip each slice, as fast as toasted, in boiling water; butter, salt slightly, and lay in a deep covered dish; have ready in a saucepan enough boiling milk to cover all well; when the toast is packed in the dish, salt the milk slightly, melt in a bit of butter, and pour over them; cover closely, and let it stand five minutes before using it.

Stewed Fruit for Young Children. — Put sliced and peeled apples, or plums, currants, and gooseberries, into a stone jar, and sprinkle among them as much brown sugar as is necessary; put in a large teacupful of water to keep the fruit from burning; slices of bread or some rice may be put in the jar to eat with the fruit. This is a very good and simple way of preparing food for children.

Bread Collops for Children or Invalids. — Make the bread collops the day you roast beef; when the beef is ready for the spit cut out of it at intervals some thick slices; in the gaps made by these slices fit closely some thick slices of stale white bread; fasten them by means of skewers, and leave them there while the beef roasts. They will be thoroughly soaked through with beef juice, and the cut slices may be broiled on a gridiron and served with them.

Bread Pudding with Egg. — Two ounces of crumbs of bread; half a pint of fresh milk, boiling hot.

Pour the hot milk on the bread, cover, and leave for an hour; then add the yolk of an egg well beaten, a teaspoonful of rose or orange flower water, a little nutmeg, and half an ounce of sugar; beat all together, tie up, and boil, steam, or bake three quarters of an hour.

Bread Pudding without Egg. — Pour half a pint of boiling milk over two ounces of bread crumbs, cover, and leave for an hour; then flavor to taste, beat light, tie in a cloth, and boil twenty minutes.

Bread Sauce. — The crumbs of one French roll; half a pint of water; six or eight black peppercorns; a small piece of onion; salt to taste.

Boil till smooth; then add a piece of butter the size of a walnut, and mix for use. It is good hot with hot birds, cold with cold birds, and is an excellent food for the sick.

Brown-Bread Sauce. — Same quantity of brown-bread crumb as above; half a pint of water; six peppercorns; one tomato (or more), peeled and sliced; a small piece of onion; salt to taste.

Cook as above.

Duke of York's Universal Sauce for Invalids. — Harddried toast pounded fine in a mortar; one tablespoonful of peppercorns pounded fine in a mortar; one teacupful of water; one teaspoonful of salt; one dessertspoonful of vinegar; a pinch of parsley chopped fine.

Boil the pounded toast, peppercorns, parsley, and salt in the water; then add the vinegar, or tarragon vinegar, or lemon juice.

Sauce au Naturel for Fish. — All fish is made more digestible by having a few drops of lemon juice squeezed over it.

White Mayonnaise Sauce for Invalids. — The yolk of a hard-boiled egg; a pinch of salt; a pinch of pepper; twelve teaspoonfuls of olive-oil; two teaspoonfuls of white vinegar.

Rub the yolk to a powder with a wooden spoon; then add the oil, drop by drop, stirring steadily all the time; then the vinegar and salt.

Egg Soup. — Yolks of two eggs; one pint of water; butter, a lump as large as a walnut; sugar to taste.

Beat up over a slow fire, gradually adding the water; when it begins to boil, pour it backwards and forwards between the vessels, until it is smooth and frothy.

Soup Meagre. — Half a pound of butter; six mediumsized onions peeled and cut small; one bunch of celery cut in pieces an inch long; one handful of spinach cut small; one bundle of parsley chopped fine; a very little flour; two quarts of boiling water; a handful of dry bread crust broken fine; a teaspoonful of pepper; salt to taste; three blades of mace beaten fine; yolks of two eggs beaten light; one teaspoonful of vinegar.

When the butter is melted throw in the onions, stir and shake well; then sprinkle in the celery, spinach, and parsley, and shake for a quarter of an hour; then sprinkle in the flour, and stir well; pour on the boiling water, add the bread crust, salt, pepper, and mace; boil gently another half-hour; then beat up the eggs and vinegar, stir in, and the soup is ready.

Bread Soup. — Take the crust of a stale roll, cut it in pieces, and boil well in a pint of water with a piece of butter the size of a walnut, stirring and beating until the bread is mixed; season with celery and salt.

Spinach Soup. — One and a half pounds of fresh spinach, picked, washed, and chopped; four ounces of fresh butter; one ounce of sifted flour; two quarts of chicken broth; one teaspoonful of cream.

Put the spinach and butter into a three-quart stewpan, stir over the fire for five minutes, add the flour, and stir again three or four minutes; then stir in two quarts of chicken broth, till it boils; simmer on a cool stove for half an hour, and add the cream. Endive or lettuce soup may be prepared the same way.

Invalid's Toasted Cheese. — Quite new cheese cut into thin slices, buttered, and basted while toasting with a little cream; let it be brought up on a hot-water plate, and eaten with a little stale bread. This dish is delicious, but should never be eaten by an invalid without the doctor's permission.

Lettuce with Gravy (Gouge). — Eight round and full cabbage lettuce; three pinches of salt; one fagot, or sweet bunch, consisting of parsley, thyme, and a bay leaf; one onion, with two cloves stuck into it; enough broth to cover the lettuce; two gills of stock-pot fat.

Trim off all the outside leaves of the lettuce, wash, and blanch ten minutes, cool well, squeeze out the water, cut them in two, lay them open on a dish, and season; tie the halves together, and put in a two-quart saucepan; cover with broth, and add the other ingredients as above; place a round of paper on top, and simmer for two hours; when cooked, drain on a cloth until dry, and open the lettuce, cut the stalks out, and fold the leaves round, and dish them in a circle; reduce one pint of household gravy to half the quantity, pour over the lettuce, and serve; thin slices of crumb of bread, cut in the shape of lettuce, can be put in at intervals.

Invalids Mashed Potato. — Boil one pound of potatoes in their jackets, until they are tender; peel them, rub them through a fine sieve; when cool, add a small teacupf ul of cream and a little salt, beating the puree up lightly until it is quite smooth, and warm again before eating.

Invalid's Potato Surprise. — Scoop out the inside of a sound potato, leaving the skin attached on one side to the hole, as a lid; mince up fine the lean of a juicy mutton chop, with a little salt and pepper; put into the potato, fasten the lid, and bake or roast; before serving add a little hot gravy if the mince seems too dry.

Boiled Pigeon or Partridge. — Clean and season the bird, enclose it in puff paste, and boil; serve in its own gravy, supplemented by the liver rubbed up with some stock, and do not forget the bread sauce.

Boiled Flounders. — Put the flounders in a stewpan, with a moderate quantity of boiling water, seasoned with a little salt; take off the scum, and continue the boiling ten minutes; drain the fish, squeeze some lemon juice over, and serve.

DRINKS FOR INVALIDS.

Invalid's Eggnog. — Best French brandy, four ounces; cinnamon water, four ounces; yolks of two eggs; sugar, half an ounce.

Rub the sugar and egg yolk together, then add the rest.

Malt Tea (nutrient in cases where the mouth is very dry). — Boil three ounces of malt in a quart of water.

Alkaline Drink (good in cases of inflammation). — The thin rind of a lemon ; one tablespoonful of powdered rock candy; enough boiling water to dissolve the sugar; half a pint of Vichy water, and half a pint of common water.

White Drink (Pecoction Blanche"). — Good in cases of inflammation. Burnt hartshorn, powdered, two ounces; gum arabic, an ounce and a half; water, three pints.

Boil down to a pint, strain, and sugar.

Barley Water. — Wash two ounces of pearl barley with cold water, then boil it for five minutes in some fresh water, and throw both waters away; then pour on two quarts of boiling water, and boil it down to a quart; flavor with thinly cut lemon rind, and sugar to taste, but do not strain except at the patient's special request.

Bael Drink (good in dysentery and diarrhoea). — The liquid extract of unripe bael fruit (liquor belac), one or two tablespoonfuls to a pint of water.

Alum Whey (good in diarrhoea). — One quart of new milk; quarter of an ounce of alum. Make as rennet whey.

Almond Drink (softening and nutritive to the lungs). — Two ounces of compound powder of almonds (can be bought at any druggist's); one pint of water.

Rub the almond powder well into the water.

Claret Cup for Invalids. — Six drops of sweet spirits of nitre, put into the jug first; half a bottle of claret; one bottle of soda water.

Slippery-Elm-Bark Tea. — Break the bark into bits, pour boiling water over it, cover, and let it infuse until cold; sweeten and ice; good for summer disorders, and also for bad colds.

Milk Punch for Invalids. — One tumbler of milk, well sweetened; two tablespoonfuls of best brandy, well stirred in.

Egg and Milk Punch. — Is made as above, adding an egg beaten light with the sugar, and stirred in before the brandy is added.

Sangaree or Porteree. — One third wine or porter to two thirds water; sweeten to taste, and add grated nuts meg. This is better hot than cold.

A Hailstorm Julep. — Some sprigs of green mint bruised in a tumbler; a large teaspoonful of white sugar; enough water to fill the glass three quarters full.

Fill up with pounded ice; stir hard; pour into a large glass that you may shake up well, and add two tablespoons- fuls of fine brandy.

Apple Toddy. — Boil a large, juicy pippin in a quart of water, and, when broken to pieces, strain off the water; while boiling hot add a glassful of fine old whiskey, a little lemon juice, and sweeten to taste.

Eau Sucree. — Dissolve three or four lumps of loaf sugar in a glass of water.

Gum-Arabic Water. — Wash some gum arabic, put into a tumbler, pour on boiling water, and stir until it is dissolved. Excellent for a tickling cough.

Lemonade. — One lemon, juice and thin parings; one ounce of rock candy; one pint of boiling water.

Put the lemon paring into a jug with the candy, squeeze in the juice, and add a pint of boiling water; cover closely, and let it cool. Orange or pineapple drink may be made in the same way.

Linseed Tea or Water. — Whole linseed, one ounce; white sugar, one ounce; liquorice root, half an ounce; lemon juice, four tablespoonfuls.

Put the ingredients into a jug, pour over them two pints of boiling water, let them stand in a hot place four hours; then strain and use. Do not give this drink to patients taking lead, iron, or copper.

Toast Water. — Slices of toast nicely browned; enough boiling water to cover them.

Cover closely, and steep until cold; strain and ice.

Jelly Water. — One large teaspoonful of any tart fruitjelly; one goblet of ice-water. Beat up well.

Flax-seed lemonade. — Four tablespoonfuls of whole flax-seed; one quart of boiling water poured on the flaxseed; the juice of two lemons; sweeten to taste.

Steep three hours in a covered pitcher; if too thick, put in cold water with the lemon juice and sugar. Excellent for colds.

Irish-Moss Lemonade (Iceland moss is equally good). — One handful of Irish moss, washed in five waters; two quarts of boiling water, poured on the moss, and left until cold; two lemons peeled and sliced, leaving out the peel; sweeten well, and ice.

Do not strain, and if it thickens too much add cold water. Good for feverish colds and all pulmonary troubles.

Lemon Water. — Peel very carefully and thinly one large lemon, put it into a jug with a lump of sugar, pour over it one quart and a half of boiling water, let it stand till cold, strain, and it is ready for use. More lemon peel may be used. It is best to make it overnight, and let it stand until morning.

Apple Water. — Is made in the same way, but more peel, of course, is required. It is best to use the tart apples.

Quince Water. — Peel and cut up into quarters two large quinces; pour over them one quart and a half of boiling water; let it stand all night, then drain, and sweeten. This is very good for colds.

Caudle. — Take one paper of Robinson's prepared groats; make it perfectly smooth from lumps; add a large tablespoonful of ground cinnamon, half a teaspoonful of ground mace, half a nutmeg, and two large cupfuls of powdered sugar; mix all well together, and then add, gradually, water until it is smooth and rather thin; have half a gallon of water boiling on the fire with half a pound of stoned raisins; take out the raisins, and add the groats; when the whole nearly boils, add three pints of sherry wine and the juice of five or six lemons; boil all together, put the raisins in a stone jar, and strain the candle over them. Wine, sugar, or lemons may be added at any time before the final boiling; stir constantly for fear of burning; serve hot in small cups.

Clove Tea. — Six whole cloves; one tumblerful of boiling water. Cover closely and leave all night; then strain and drink.

Violet Tea (" Tisane de Violettes"). (Good to induce perspiration.) — Half an ounce of dried violets put into two pints of boiling water; let them stand near the fire half an hour; then strain and use.

Mint Tea. — Take half an ounce of green mint leaves, crush, and infuse in boiling water; sweeten, and, when cold, strain. It is healing to the stomach and bowels. Rosemary, balsam, and southernwood teas may be made in the same way.

Catnip Tea. — Make as above. Good for colds and colic.

Aniseed Tea. — Make as above. Good for colds and colic.

Fennel Seeds Steeped in Brandy. — Good for colds and colic.

Tansy-andrRue Tea. — Make in the same way as "Mint Tea." Good for colds and colic.

Chamomile and Gentian Teas. — 'Are made in the same way as "Mint Tea," and are excellent tonics, taken cold or hot.

Pennyroyal Tea. — Make in the same way as "Mint Tea." Good to induce perspiration.

Tea of Parsley Root. — Parsley root, scraped and steeped in boiling water, is good for strangury and kindred affections, as is, also, tea of dried pumpkin seeds.

Rose Tea. — Half an ounce of red rosebuds (the white heels being taken off); three tablespoonfuls of white wine vinegar; one ounce of white sugar candy.

Pour over these ingredients two pints of boiling water; . let them stand near the fire for two hours, then strain. Similar acid drinks may be made of apple jelly, guava jelly, damson cheese, currant jelly, or syrup of gooseberries, barberries, etc.

Sage Tea. — Half an ounce of fresh, green sage leaves, plucked from the stalks, and washed clean; one ounce of sugar; a quarter of an ounce of outer rind of finely pared lemon peel.

Pour over these ingredients two pints of boiling water, let them stand near the fire an hour, then strain; when the sage is dried, less than half an ounce must be used.

Oatmeal Tea. — One handful of oatmeal; one gallon of boiling water.

Mix in a deep vessel; let the oatmeal subside, which it does in half an hour; then pour off the tea. By this process hard water is made digestible.

Tea of Green Strawberry Leaves. — A good wash for a cankered mouth.

Sage Tea. — Sweetened with honey, and with a small bit of alum dissolved in it, is an excellent gargle for sore throat.

Cleansing Wash for the Mouth before Food. — One tablespoonful of Condy's solution in a pint of tepid water.

White Wine Whey, No. 1. — One quart of new milk; one gill of sherry.

Put the milk in a saucepan, and stir it over a clear fire until it is nearly boiling; then add the sherry, and simmer for a quarter of an hour, skimming off the curd as it rises; then add a tabtespoonful more of sherry, and skim again for a few minutes.

White Wine Whey, No. 2. — One pint of fresh milk; two wineglassfuls of Madeira wine.

Put on the milk, and when it boils throw in the wine and let it come again to a boil; strain without stirring it. The quantity of wine must be regulated by the advice of a physician; less than one glassful of wine will not turn a pint of milk to whey. If the wine whey must be very weak, add whey turned with rennet to dilute it.

Rennet Whey. — One quart of new milk, warm from the cow, if possible; one large tablespoonful of rennet.

Heat the milk (if it be not warm from the cow) to the same temperature, add the rennet, keep up the heat ft little higher until the curd separates, and take it off with a spoon.

Tamarind Whey. — Boil two ounces of tamarinds in two pints of milk, strain, and serve. It may be taken cold or hot.

Restorative Jelly (" Boston Cook-Book "). — Two calf'sfeet; two quarts of cold water; half a cupful of sugar; one lemon; one inch of stick cinnamon; one and a half eggs, whites and shells; one cupful of port wine; two cloves; one tablespoonful of powdered gum-arabic.

Scald the feet and clean thoroughly; split, break the bones, and put them into cold water; heat slowly, and simmer gently until reduced to a pint and a half; strain, and when cold remove the fat; add the other ingredients except the wine; put it over the fire and stir until hot; let it boil five minutes, or until a thick scum has formed; set it back on the stove, skim, and add the wine; strain through a fine napkin into a shallow dish; when cool and firm cut with a silver knife into small squares. This is good for a very weak patient or an old person.

Baked Lemon or Orange. — Bake a lemon or sour orange twenty minutes in a moderate oven; when done, cut open, take out the inside, and eat with sugar or molasses. Excellent for hoarseness.

Portable Beef Tea ("Boston Cook-Book"). — Two pounds of lean beef, cut fine; half a box of gelatine.

Soak together in one pint of cold water one hour, squeezing often; heat to nearly the boiling-point; strain, pressing all the juice from the meat; fill a glass jar with the juice, place the jar in water, and heat until the water outside the jar boils; seal while hot; dissolve two teaspoonfuls of the above preparation in half a cupful of boiling water, add a few grains of salt, and serve at once. This is a convenient form of food for travellers.

Broiled-Beef Essence. — Broil half a pound of round steak one or two minutes, or until the juice will flow; cut it into small pieces; squeeze the juice into a heated bowl placed in hot water; salt and serve.

Broiled-Beef Tea. — Proceed as above, but add half a cupful of boiling water to the essence.

Laban (" Boston Cook-Book "). — One quart of new milk; one tablespoonful of yeast stirred into the milk.

Let it stand in a cool place to harden, which will take from three to twenty-four hours; when hard take a tablespoonful of the mixture and stir it into new milk, and then set away to harden again. This is "Laban." It should be eaten with sugar and cream. If a constant supply be needed, reserve one tablespoonful each day for the next preparation. It is both palatable and digestible.

Com Tea and Rice Coffee (" Boston Cook-Book "). — Brown one cupful of dried sweet corn or rice; pound or grind it fine; add one pint of cold water and steep one hour; strain, and serve with sugar and cream. They are pleasant and nourishing beverages.

Gluten Gems ("Boston Cook-Book"). — Two cupfuls of gluten; half a teaspoon ul of salt; two teaspoonf uls of baking-powder; two tablespoonfuls of sugar; one egg; two cupfuls of water or milk.

Bake in very hot buttered gem-pans, in a hot oven, half an hour.

Raisin-Milk Porridge. — Two dozen raisins, quartered; two cupfuls of milk-; one tablespoonful of flour; salt to taste.

Boil the raisins in a little water twenty minutes; let the water boil away and add the milk; when boiling add the flour, rubbed to a thin paste with a little cold water; boil eight or ten minutes; season with salt, strain, and serve.

GENERAL HINTS FOR THE SICKROOM.

An open fireplace, and in winter an open fire, are necessary. A candle, of the best quality, is the only safe light. Lamps of all kinds should be avoided.

The bed should be placed so as to command a good view of the room, as it frequently makes a patient nervous to hear any movement going on behind the bed. Draughts must be carefully avoided, and neither sun nor candle allowed to shine full on the bed.

In visiting a sick person stand or sit near the foot of the bed, so that the patient need make no effort to see you. It is distressing to invalids to have people too close to them, or to have them sit near the head of the bed, so that the invalid is obliged to turn round and look upwards. Never wear creaking shoes or a rustling garment. Next to perfect, immaculate cleanliness, comes complete silence.

If it be necessary to replenish a coal fire, avoid noise by putting the coal into a paper bag, and putting bag and all on the fire.

Never keep soiled clothes or food of any kind in a sickroom. If two beds are used, keep the mattress and blankets of the odd bed in another room, exposed to air and sunlight, and make up the bed freshly just before you move the patient, then carry away at once the mattress, pillows, blankets, etc., and put them in another room to air; cover the palliasse or springs of the empty bed with a neat coverlet so that it may present a decent appearance. Keep all food well covered up in an adjoining room, which should be well aired.

In sweeping a sick-room envelop the broom in a cottonflannel bag wet with cold water; it should be put on with the nap side out. Always dust a sick-room with a damp cloth.

Never enter a sick-room when in a violent perspiration, or with an empty stomach, as then the system more readily receives contagion. If obliged to sit up all night, provide yourself with something to eat, if only a cake of chocolate.

TO KEEP ICE IN A SICK-ROOM (" BOSTON COOK-BOOK").

Tie a square of coarse white flannel over a pitcher, leaving a cup-shaped depression in the centre. All this with broken ice, and cover tightly with a thicker flannel; it will keep well.

HOT BANDAGES.

In applying hot bandages, dip the flannel in boiling water, place it in the centre of a coarse towel, and twist and wring the ends of the towel; or, place the flannels in a steamer over hot water until penetrated with the steam; they will then need no wringing.

CONVENIENCES IN A SICK-EOOM.

In severe sickness a glass tube is useful for feeding drinks and gruels, and little white china boats with spouts are also good; a wooden tray, with legs six or seven inches high, to stand on the bed, is useful for serving meals.

GENERAL HINTS AS TO DIET FOR INVALIDS (BOSTON COOKBOOK ").

Milk should enter largely into the diet of children and invalids; it should be used with discretion, and not drunk too fast; a large glass of milk swallowed suddenly will form in the stomach a lump of dense, cheesy curd, which may even prove fatal to a weak stomach. Under the action of the stomach this cheesy mass will turn over and over like a heavy weight, and as the gastric juice can only attack its surface it digests slowly; but this same milk, taken slowly, or with dry toast, light rolls, or soft, dry porridge, forms a porous lump through which the gastric juice can easily pass, and which breaks up every time the stomach turns it over. Milk should be very slightly salted, and eaten with breadstuffs, or sipped by the spoonful. Cow's milk produces less heat than human milk; a child will grow thin upon it unless a little sugar be added. Wheat flour has such an excess of heat-producing power as to fatten a child unduly, and should have cow's milk added to it to reduce its fattening power.

Vanilla should never be used as a flavoring for invalids. Pepper, in small quantities, is allowable, but only white or cayenne pepper, never black.

Boiled onions are soothing to the mucous membrane; in inflammation of the stomach they are healthful when a piece of white bread could not be digested. Broiled or roasted squab, venison, chicken, mutton, and beef, in the order given, are the most easily assimilated meats.

Game, being rich in phosphates, is valuable for invalids. Broiled bacon, dusted with cayenne, is an easily digested form of fat.

Tomatoes are very healthy, and are considered by many physicians a remedy for dyspepsia and indigestion. Watery, green, or diseased potatoes should never be eaten; young potatoes are indigestible.

Eggs for sick people should be taken raw, boiled very lightly, or boiled very hard; when cooked in any other manner they are indigestible.

Soups which have in them cream or milk are better for invalids than those rich in gelatine. Cream of celery and Potage a la Reine Victoire are particularly good.

Strong bouillon is adapted to those suffering from hemorrhoids, or any disease of the rectum, as there is no solid waste.

Diabetics should abstain from sugar, and anything which is converted into sugar in digestion, such as all starchy foods and vegetables.

The corpulent should abstain from fat, sugar, and starchy foods.

The bilious and gouty should eat sparingly of brown meats, cheese, eggs, beans, pease, or food which is rich in albuminoids.

The constipated should avoid fried or greasy foods, hot bread, rich cake, veal, pork, coarse oatmeal, etc.

Those people who have consumptive tendencies should eat wholesome, easily digested and assimilated food, with plenty of fat, i. e., cream, sweet butter, fat of roast or boiled meat, salads, cornmeal, oatmeal, etc.

HOUSEHOLD, TOILET, AND MEDICAL RECEIPTS.

HOUSEHOLD RECEIPTS.

To Preserve Eggs. — Slake a lump of lime, making the mixture as thick as ordinary whitewash; let it stand three weeks; pack the eggs carefully in a jar, or any vessel that will hold the liquid.

To Preserve Milk. — Bottle the milk tightly, using wine corks; place them in a kettle of cold water; heat the water gradually until it reaches boiling-point; then remove the kettle from the fire and allow it to cool; then pack the bottles for future use; milk prepared in this manner will keep for six months.

To Preserve Lime Juice. — Strain the juice, and to every pint add one pound of double-refined sugar; let it stand in the sun; as the scum rises, skim it off, and when it is quite free from scum put into pint bottles and cork it well; it will keep for months.

To Clean Wine Bottles. — -Put some shot in the bottles, fill them half full of water, and shake the shot about until the bottle is thoroughly cleaned; the water had better be changed two or three times during the process; be very careful not to leave any shot in the bottles, as the acid of the wine acts on it poisonously.

To Clean Brasses. — Grate Bath brick to a fine powder, saturate it with alcohol, and rub on the brass with a rag, until it is quite bright and clean; finish polishing with a chamois cloth.

To Clean Straw Matting. — Wash with a cloth dipped in clean salt and water; wipe dry at once, or it will turn yellow.

To Clean Paint. — Use a rather soft, flat brush, warm water, and plenty of suds; wash off the suds with a flannel cloth dipped in cold water, and dry with a clean cloth. Paint should always be washed and dried quickly.

To Remove Stains from Marble. — Make a mortar of unslacked lime and very strong lye; cover the spot thickly with it, and leave it on for six weeks; wash it off perfectly clean, and rub hard with a brush dipped in a lather of soap and water; polish with a smooth, hard brush.

To Clean a Marble Floor. — If not very dirty, the plan adopted in Italy is the best. The Italians use clean, fresh sawdust, slightly dampened. This cleans a marble floor quickly and well; if the floor be of cement, dark in color, and varnished to imitate mosaic, the Italians clean as above, and polish with flannel cloths, dipped in oil and vinegar.

Stains of Iron Mould. — Moisten with ink, and, while wet, rub in muriatic acid, diluted with five times its weight of water.

Ink Stains. — If wet, wash in skim milk, then in cold water, then again in hot. For dry ink stains use oxalic acid, or lemon juice and salt.

Mildew. — Equal parts of lemon juice, salt, powdered starch, and soft soap; rub on thickly, and lay on the grass in the hot sun ; repeat this process two or three times a day.

Stains of Acids and Alkalies. — Treat acid stains with hartshorn; alkaline with acids.

Stains on Silk or Woollen. — Moisten with the scouring spirit, and rub until the spot disappears.

To Wash Black Goods. — Rip the stuff, and select the best for cleaning; buy five cents' worth of pulverized soap bark, and let it stand in a little water until dissolved; put the black stuff in enough lukewarm water to cover it, turn in the soap bark, rinse the stuff up and down until it is quite saturated, then rinse in clear, lukewarm water. The effect upon bunting is remarkable, cleansing and restoring; but various black stuffs may be cleaned in this way.

To Clean Black Goods. — Two parts of soft water; one part of alcohol or turpentine.

Wash with a well-soaped sponge dipped in the mixture; rub both sides of the stuff, stretching it on a table; sponge off with clear hot water, and iron on the wrong side, and while damp.

To Wash Silk. — Mix well two cupfuls of cold water, one tablespoonful of strained honey, one tablespoonful of soft-soap, and one wineglassful of alcohol.

Shake up well, lay the silk on a table; sponge each breadth on both sides, rubbing well; then shake about well in a tub of cold water; flap dry, but do not wring it; hang by the edges until fit to iron, and iron on the wrong side while damp.

To Smooth Wrinkled Silk. — Sponge on the right side with very weak gum-arabic and water, and iron on the wrong side.

To Wash Woollens. — Wash in clean, hot soap suds, rinse out in clear, hot water, and shake, but do not wring.

To Wash Lawn or Thin Muslin. — Two quarts of wheat bran; six quarts of water".

Boil half an hour, strain, and mix in the water in which the muslin is to be washed; if possible, use neither soap nor starch; rinse lightly in clear water. This preparation both cleanses and stiffens.

To Wash Doubtful Calicoes. — One teaspoonful of sugar of lead; one pailful of water.

Mix, put in the calico, and soak fifteen minutes before washing.

To Wash Tidies made of Antique Lace. — Soak in borax water, then let them lie in warm suds, squeezing them in your hands; rinse, but do not blue them; instead of ironing them, pull them in shape and pin to a clean cloth on your ironing - board; let them get quite dry before removing them.

To Wash Black Lace. — Half a cupful of rain water; one teaspoonful of borax; one tablespoon ful of spirits of wine.

Squeeze the tumbled rusty lace through this four times, then rinse in a cupful of hot water, in which a black kid glove has been boiled; pull out the edges of the lace, and put under pressure for two days.

To Wash White Lace Edging. — Cover a quart bottle with linen, stitched smoothly to fit the shape; begin at the bottom and wind the lace about it, basting fast at both edges, even the minutest point, to the linen; wash on the bottle, soaping it well; rinse by plunging in a pail of fair water, and boil as you would a white handkerchief, bottle and all; set in the sun to dry; when quite dry, clip the basting threads, and use without ironing.

To Renew Wrinkled Crape. — Stretch over a basin of boiling water, holding it smooth, but not tight, over the top, until the steam fairly penetrates it; fold while damp, and put under pressure.

To Restore the Pile of Velvet. — If but slightly pressed, treat as you would crape; if badly crushed, wet on the wrong side, and pass the wet side of the velvet slowly over the flat surface of a hot iron; as the steam rises to the right side it will raise the pile with it; dry without handling.

To Curl Tumbled Feathers. — Hold over a hot fire, not hot enough to burn; shake out, and heat again until curled.

To Keep Woollens. — Beat, brush, and sun for a day; shake hard, fold neatly, and pin in papers which have been dipped in turpentine, and then" dried; put a lump of gum camphor in each bundle. Or, sew closely in muslin or linen cloths, and pack in whiskey barrels.

To Make Soft Soap. — Ten pounds of grease; six pounds of washing soda or wood ashes; eight gallons of hot water.

Let it stand until the grease is eaten up; if too thick, add more water; stir every day; if wood ashes are used, boil the mixture.

Mixture for Sponging Woollen Goods. — Two ounces of ammonia; two ounces of castile soap, white; one ounce of glycerine; one ounce of ether.

Cut the soap fine, dissolve in one pint of water over the fire; then add two quarts of water and the other ingredients; mix and stir well, and bottle. This should be mixed with water in the proportion of a teacupful to an ordinary pail of water; mix thoroughly, and wash soiled garments in it. For removing spots, use a sponge or clean flannel cloth, and with a dry cloth rub as dry as possible. Woollen goods may be made to look bright and fresh by being sponged with this.

To Prevent Lampwicks from Smoking. — Lampwicks should be soaked in good vinegar, and afterwards thoroughly dried ; they will burn perfectly well, and will never smoke if this process is adopted.

To Remove Grease from Carpets. — Take some oxgall from the butcher's, put it in water, and wash the carpets with it.

To Remove Port and Claret Stains. — Cover the stain thickly with salt, and, when dry, wet them again with sherry before washing in hot water.

To Clean a Furred Tea-kettle. — Put a few spoonfuls of ammonia in water, and boil in the tea-kettle. It will cleanse it thoroughly.

To Sweeten Bitter Yeast. — Wash a poker clean, and dry it; then heat it red-hot, and thrust it red-hot into the yeast. It will not fail to sweeten it.

To Restore Worn Steel Pens. — Heat the pen in gaslight, and dip instantly into cold water. It will make it as good as new.

Clothes Catching Fire. — Throw yourself instantly on the floor, and roll yourself in a rug or blanket, if you have one. Children should be taught this as soon as they are able to understand.

To Escape from a Burning Place. — If you have to pass by flames, muffle the mouth and nose in wet bandages or thick woollen, and creep on all fours, no matter how great the haste, as the cold air falls to the floor, and one can breathe there when it is impossible elsewhere. Children should be early taught this also.

To Draw Out a Broken Needle. — If no surgeon be at hand, and all other remedies fail, a broken needle may be drawn out of the flesh in which it has embedded itself by the action of a strong magnet, which should be applied to the skin.

Plants in a Room. — A. few plants add rather to the health of a room than otherwise, as they give out oxygen and inhale carbonic acid; but many plants produce a slight malaria. Neither plants nor cut flowers should be allowed to remain overnight in a sleeping-room.

For Staining Wooden Floors. — The best plain stainingfluid is permanganate of potash. It not only stains, but purines, being the foundation of a powerful disinfectant. Buy wholesale; dissolve one and a half ounces in a gallon of boiling water (this will make quite a dark stain); stir the.jnixtiire thoroughly with a stick, and lay it on with a painter's flat brush, a large one, working the way of the grain of the wood quickly and boldly. A small brush should be used for corners and crevices. When dry the staining can be repeated if it is not dark enough. The floor should then be rubbed over with a woollen duster, and linseed oil should be rubbed on freely with a piece of flannel, always following the grain of the wood. Two or three layers of linseed oil should be laid on, as this sets the stain; it is then ready to be polished with beeswax and turpentine. To prepare this, cut up the beeswax into small pieces, put it into a pot, and pour sufficient turpentine over it to cover it; set the pot in the oven, or on the stove, until the wax is thoroughly melted; then leave it to get cold, when it should be of the consistency of pomatum; rub on the wax, not too much of it, with a piece of flannel, and then polish with a polishing-brush. The best kind are the weighted ones with long handles, as they do not entail so much stooping; but other kinds, not so expensive, are easily to be obtained. This method of treating floors is quite the best and most wholesome for bedrooms, which should be stained uniformly all over. They can be kept very clean and bright by rubbing daily with a duster, and by a weekly application of beeswax and turpentine. After these floors are once well polished, they require but little labor — not more than scrubbing floors or washing oilcloths.

To Restore Scorched Linen. — If linen has been scorched in ironing, and the mark has not gone through so as to damage the texture, it may be removed by the following process: Take two onions, peel, slice, and pound them to extract the juice; then cut up half an ounce of white soap and two ounces of fuller's-earth; mix with them the onion juice and half a pint of vinegar; boil this composition well, then spread it; when cool cover the scorched part of the linen, and let it dry on ; afterwards wash out the linen.

To Shrink Flannel. — Dip the flannel into boiling water, taking care to saturate it thoroughly; shake, but do not wring, and at once hang it up in the sun to dry. It will never shrink again.

Your Own Mason. — Small holes in white walls can be easily repaired by mixing equal parts of plaster of Paris and white sand (scouring sand) to a paste; mix a small quantity at a time, and apply with a knife or flat piece of wood. This cement hardens at once, and is very durable.

To Extinguish Kerosene Flames. — If no cloth is at hand, throw flour on the flames. Flour rapidly absorbs the fluid, and deadens the flame.

To Prevent Horses' Feet from Scalding or Cracking. — Coat the hoofs once a week with an ointment consisting of equal parts of soap fat, yellow wax, linseed oil, Venice turpentine, and Norway tar; melt the wax separately before mixing.

To Preserve Sheepskins for Mats. — Dissolve one pound of alum and one pound of salt in a gallon of water; put the skin in soon after it is taken from the sheep, and let it soak twenty-four hours; then nail it on an old door, skin uppermost, till quite dry; line it with a piece of old carpet (after cutting it straight) to prevent the possibility of its greasing the floor.

General Scouring Spirit. — One ounce of pyroligneous ether; three drachms of the essence of lemon.

Mix, moisten the grease-spot in silk or cloth well with this mixture, and rub it until it disappears.

To Drive away Rats. — Chloride of lime is an infallible preventive, as rats flee from its odor as from a pestilence. It should be thrown down their holes, and spread about wherever they are likely to come. It should be renewed once a fortnight.

To Drive away Mosquitoes. — Some of the Venetian mosquito powder burned in the room is very effective.

Or, if the herb called pennyroyal can be obtained, a bunch of it tied at the head of the bed will drive the mosquitoes away.

To Drive away any Insect which Infests Woodwork or Iron. — The following receipt was given me by a wellknown dealer in antique furniture in Florence. He told me that it never failed, and that he had often used it on old pieces of furniture, which, to use his own expression, " walked away of themselves."

Aequa Mmtra. — For every quart of pure water one ounce of potash. Mix and stir until thoroughly dissolved, but do not boil it.

Smell of Paint. — To get rid of the smell of oil paint, put a handful of hay into a pailful of water, and let it stand in a room newly painted.

To Render Awnings Waterproof. — Plunge the awning first into a solution containing twenty per cent, of soap, and then into another solution containing the same percentage of sulphate of copper; then wash, and the operation is accomplished.

Glue for Ready Use. — To any quantity of glue use common whiskey instead of water; put both in a bottle, cork tightly, and set away for three or four days; it will then be fit for use.

To Purify Foul Water. — Where a filter is unattainable, a very little alum will purify foul water. An ounce of alum will purify a whole hogshead of foul water.

To Soften Hard Water. — Where soda is not obtainable or advisable, use wood ashes. It never fails to soften hard water, as it contains carbonate of potassa, which, uniting with the sulphate of lime, forms a substance which falls to the bottom, leaving the water soft.

Bad Drinking Water. — Wherever the drinking water is not absolutely beyond suspicion, it should invariably be boiled and filtered before using. This treatment will make almost any water safe.

To Manage a "Bain-marie." — If the bain-marie (i. a, the water in the outside kettle) does not boil as quickly as it ought, it is better to fill the outside kettle with brine, which always boils more quickly.

TOILET RECEIPTS.

Lotion for Freckles. — One teacupf nl of sour milk; a little scraped horseradish.

Let it stand from six to twelve hours, and wash the parts affected twice a day.

Almond Ball. — Put into an earthen saucepan, set in a pan of boiling water, one ounce of white wax, one ounce of pure spermaceti, and one gill of oil of almonds well stirred in; add to this, when it begins to grow cool, half a drachm of essential oil of almonds; half a drachm of expressed oil of mace, and half a drachm of balsam of Peru ; stir until smooth and perfectly amalgamated; then pour into egg-cups; turn out when hard. These balls passed over the clean and dry skin at bedtime greatly improve the softness of the complexion.

Glycerine Balsam. — Half an ounce of white wax; one ounce of spermaceti; one gill of oil of almonds.

Melt slowly in a porcelain kettle, and when melted and stirred smooth add one ounce and a half of glycerine that has been already scented by a quarter of an ounce of balsam of Peru, or by sixteen drops of attar of roses; stir constantly until cold; then pour into china jars.

Cold Cream, No. 1. — Take a quarter of an ounce of white wax, and shred it into a basin with one ounce of almond oil; place the basin by the fire until the wax is dissolved; then add very slowly one ounce of rose-water, little by little, and during this time beat smartly with 'a fork to make the water incorporate, and continue beating until it is accomplished; then pour into jars for use.

Cold Cream, No. 2. — Take one pound of the best lard and four ounces of spermaceti.

Melt the two together, and add one ounce of rose-water, beating as above directed.

Red Lip Salve. — Take four ounces of white wax, four ounces of olive-oil, half an ounce of spermaceti, twenty drops of oil of lavender, and two ounces of alkanet root.

Macerate the alkanet for three or four days in the oliveoil; then strain, and melt in it the wax and spermaceti; when nearly cold add the oil of lavender, and stir it till quite firmly set.

Hair Stimulant. — One ounce of spirits of turpentine; one ounce of trotter oil; thirty drops of acetic solution of cantharides.

To be applied three times a week.

Hair Wash for Scurf and Dandruff. — Put one ounce of flowers of sulphur into one quart of clear, cold water; agitate often for several hours; then pour off the liquid and saturate the scalp with it every morning.

Pomade Divine. — Take four pounds of mutton suet, one pound of white wax, an ounce and a half each of essence of bergamot and essence of lemon, and half an ounce each of oil of lavender and oil of origanum.

Melt the suet and the wax together, and, when tepid, stir in the other ingredients. The origanum has considerable power in stimulating the growth of the hair.

Rosemary Tea for the Hair. — Bruise a branch of rosemary, pour one pint of boiling water over it, and use it warm every morning. This will do for several times.

A Wash for the Scalp, or for Roughness of Skin. — Take one ounce of Belmont glycerine, half a drachm of oil of rosemary, one ounce of proof spirits, half an ounce of honey, and half a pint of lavender water.

Mix the oil of rosemary with the honey and spirits, and add the lavender water gradually, shaking up well; then put in the glycerine and cork.

Pomade Angelique. — Mix fresh beef marrow and carefully prepared neat's-foot or trotter's oil in equal proportions; melt in a water bath, strain (through coarse lace) and decant, leaving the dregs behind; after which, when nearly cool, add a few drops of attar of roses, and stir until the whole is set.

Hungary Water. — To one pint of proof spirits of wine put an ounce of oil of rosemary and two drachms of essence of ambergris; shake the bottle well several times, then let the cork remain out twenty-four hours; after a month, during which time shake it daily, put the water into small bottles.

Honey Water. — Take a pint of proof spirit, as above, and three drachms of essence of ambergris. Shake them well daily.

Lavender Water. — Take a pint of proof spirit, as above, one ounce of essential oil of lavender, and two drachms of essence of ambergris.

Put all into a quart bottle and shake it extremely well.

Cologne Water. — Two drachms of essence of citron; two drachms of essence of bergamot; one drachm of essence of cedrat; half a drachm of essence of lavender; ten drops of essence of orange flowers; ten drops of tincture of ambergris; half a drachm of tincture of musk; three drachms of tincture of benjamin; two drops of attar of roses; two pints of proof spirits.

Mix and filter.

Aromatic Vinegar. — Dissolve two ounces of camphor, two drachms of oil of cloves, and eight ounces of rectified spirits of wine; then add two pints and a half of strong distilled vinegar.

Thieves' Vinegar. — One ounce of dried rosemary tops; one ounce of dried sage leaves; half an ounce of dried lavender flowers; fifteen grains of cloves; one quart of distilled vinegar.

Leave for seven days, then press and filter.

Old-fashioned Scent Jar. — Gather rose leaves on a very fine day, and, if you have them, damask roses; lay them in a large earthenware jar, and throw in a little common salt to every layer of roses; then two handfuls each of rosemary leaves, lavender flowers, and knotted marjoram; add a few bay leaves; put in, also, a quarter of a pound of bag salt, pounded, one ounce of orris root, sliced, one ounce of cloves, one ounce each of cinnamon, of gum benjamin, and storax, and a quarter of a pound of angelica root, sliced; when the ingredients are mixed, cover the jar close and let it stand for a week. The scent is delicious.

MEDICAL RECEIPTS.

Antidotes to Poison. — For any poison give instantly either one teaspoonful of mustard in a tumbler of warm water, or two or three teaspoonfuls of powdered alum in the same way; use until free vomiting is excited.

Arsenic. — Give large quantities of milk, and raw eggs, lime water, or flour and water; then castor oil.

Antimony. — Plenty of strong tea, and keep up the strength.

Acids (except prussic acid). — One ounce of calcined magnesia to one pint of water; give a wineglassful every two or three minutes; if no magnesia is at hand, give soap and water; give plenty of warm water to drink.

Copper, or chloride of Zinc, or Tin. — Large quantities of milk and white of eggs; afterwards, strong tea; do not give vinegar.

Lead. — One pint of water; two ounces of Epsom salts. Mix, and give a wineglassful every ten minutes, until it operates freely.

Iodine. — Large quantities of starch and water.

Green Vitriol. — Give an emetic; afterwards magnesia and water.

Lunar Caustic. — One large teaspoonful of common salt in a glassful of water, and repeat in ten minutes; then a dose of castor oil, and barley water to drink.

Mercury. — The white of an egg in a little water, three times at intervals of five minutes; then large quantities of milk, or flour and water; then linseed tea.

Nitre. — Plenty of flour and water; then olive-oil.

Phosphorus. — An emetic; then large quantities of warm water, with magnesia, or flour stirred in; no oil or fat of any description.

Poisonous Fish. — An emetic; then a full dose of castor oil, with some warm spice; a mustard plaster on the pit of the stomach.

Poisonous Plants, Mushrooms, etc. — An emetic; when the stomach is emptied give a good dose of castor oil; stimulants, if the patient be faint.

Laudanum. — Empty the stomach by an emetic; for an adult give fifteen grains of sulphate of zinc in a little water; to a young person half the quantity; to an infant, a teaspoonful of syrup of ipecac; if no drugs are at hand, use mustard and warm water, or salt and water, and tickle the top of the throat; after vomiting, give plenty of very strong coffee; put a mustard plaster round the calf of each leg, and, if faint and cold, give spirits and water; remember to keep the patient awake, at all hazards; after an overdose of laudanum, sleep is death.

To Stop the Flow of Blood. — Bathe the cut with ordinary red wine; then cover the wound with either whiting, pipe-clay, or cobwebs and brown sugar; if you have none of these, apply the fine dust of tea, or, if all are wanting, a handful of earth held tightly .to the wound until help can be obtained; if the cut is deep, it is wise not only to bandage it tightly, but to tie another bandage above, not below, the wound.

To Treat Stings. — Extract the sting; then apply at once a little bluing, slightly moistened with water; if the inflammation is great, poultice.

Bite of a Snake. — Tie a string tightly above the wound; wash, and suck it; then burn the wound to the very bottom with lunar caustic, or iron heated to a white heat; stimulants, preferably whiskey, must be given in large quantities.

Sunstroke. — Bind the head with wet cloths; wet another cloth, fold into a small square, cover thickly with salt, and apply to the back of the neck; apply dry salt behind the ears, and mustard plasters to the calves of the legs and soles of the feet. The salt is an Arabian remedy, and is very effective.

Asthma. — Soak blotting-paper in strong saltpetre water, dry, and burn at night in the patient's bedroom.

Croup. — Give a teaspoonful of ipecacuanha wine every few minutes until free vomiting is excited.

Powerful Rubefacient (good with friction for rheumatism, sprains, etc.). — One ounce of yellow bar soap, one ounce of boiling water, and three ounces of hot olive-oil, dissolved together; half an ounce of camphor dissolved in the olive-oil; when the above ingredients are well amalgamated, add one quarter ounce of oil of origanum; half an ounce of spirits of ammonia; thrice the quantity of spirits of wine. Stir until nearly cold, then keep well corked in wide jars.

Camphorated Oil. — Best oil of Lucca; gum camphor.

Pound some gum camphor, and fill a wide-necked pint bottle one third full; fill up with olive-oil, and set away until the camphor is absorbed. Excellent lotion for sore chest, sore throat, aching limbs, etc.

Lotion for Burns. — One pint of linseed oil; one pint of lime water. Mix and shake well.

Lotion for Scalds. — Equal parts of prepared lard and spermaceti cerate; blend for an ointment. This ointment is equally good for burns.

For Cold. — There is no remedy so good as to go to bed and stay there, drinking nothing, not even water, for twenty-four hours, and eating as little as possible. Or, go to bed; put your feet in hot mustard and water; put a bran or oatmeal poultice on the chest; take ten grains of Dover's powder, and an hour afterwards a pint of hot gruel; in the morning rub the body all over with a coarse towel, and take a dose of aperient medicine.

Violet, pennyroyal, or boneset tea are excellent to promote perspiration in case of sudden chill.

Or, take white wine whey. One pint of milk; two wineglassfuls of white wine; one teaspoonfnl of vinegar. Simmer gently; then strain, sweeten, and spice; give hot.

Cholagogue (old and tried remedy for chills and fever). — Sulphate of quinine, twelve grains; sulphate of copper in powder, two grains; opium in powder, two grains; gum-arabic, in powder, a sufficient quantity.

Make into a mass, with a few drops of water, and divide the mass into twenty-four pills. The dose is two pills, taken on the day after the chill, morning, noon, and night before each meal; if the chill returns on the seventh, fourteenth, or twenty-first day, take the dose after three days; if they return the first week, the pills can be taken; but the chills will not be likely to show themselves again.

Liniment for Chilblains, No. 1. — Spirits of turpentine, three drachms; camphorated oil, nine drachms.

Mix for a liniment. For an adult four drachms of the former, and eight of the latter may be used. If the child be young, or if the skin be tender, the camphorated oil may be used without the turpentine.

Liniment for Chilblains, No. 2. — Spirits of turpentine, white wine, contents of an egg in equal proportions; bottle, and shake until thoroughly amalgamated.

For Broken Chilblains. — Spread a little spermaceti cerate on lint or old linen, and apply morning and night to the part affected.

For Chapped Skin. — Keep a muslin bag filled with bran constantly soaking in the water which you use for your ablutions; the bran should be changed twice a week; immediately after bathing rub the chapped skin with deer suet, or with glycerine and rose-water, in the proportion of three parts of glycerine to one of rose-water; do this while the skin is still wet.

Earache. — There are various ways of treating earache: the most old fashioned are the appliance of a roasted onion, or a hot bag of salt to the ear, and putting in the ear a small piece of cotton wet with camphorated oil, or simple olive-oil with a drop of chloroform; better still, to puff tobacco smoke into the ear. This remedy is very soothing and effective.

Or, take a small wax taper, pare one end quite small, envelop it in a dry linen rag, insert it into the ear; then light the taper: Odd as this remedy may seem, it is wonderfully rapid and effective; it is practised by all Italian sailors and fishermen.

In Kentucky, a cockroach is drowned in whiskey, then wrapped in hot cotton, and applied to the ear.

Excellent Enema for Constipation. — Two tablespoonf uls of table salt, two tablespoonfuls of olive-oil, and one pint of thin gruel.

Lotion for Bleeding at the Nose. — Powdered alum, one drachm; water, half a pint.

This may be snuffed or syringed up the nose.

Gargle for Sore Throat, No. 1. — One wineglassful of barm; one wineglassful of vinegar; remainder sage tea, to make a half-pint bottle of gargle.

Gargle for Sore Threat, No. 2. — A pinch of chlorate of potash in a glass of water. Gargle the throat with it twice a day, or oftener, if necessary.

Gargle for Sore Throat, No. 3. — Tar water is a very good gargle for sore throat; it is to be used twice a day.

Whooping Cough. — One ounce of powdered alum; quarter of a pound of brown sugar; dissolve in two quarts of boiling water, and bottle.

For a child one year old a teaspoonful three times a day on an empty stomach. For a child two years old two teaspoonfuls for a dose. For a child five years old a tablespoonful. The state of the bowels must be attended to, and the doses repeated accordingly. No other medicine to be taken, except an emetic, at first, if desirable. Except in the case of an infant, a milk diet to be avoided.

For Worms, No. 1. — One ounce of quassia wood; one quart of boiling water.

Infuse, strain, and bottle; give a tablespoonful three times a day to a child four years old; the quantity may be increased or diminished in proportion to the age of the child.

For Worms, No. 2. — Half an ounce of pink root; quarter of an ounce of senna; quarter of an ounce of fennel; one pint of boiling water.

One tablespoonful three times a day to a child four years old.

Injection for Pin Worms, No. 1. — Two ounces of quassia wood; one quart of boiling water.

Injection for Pin Worms, No. 2. — Lump of lime the size of an egg; one quart of water.

External Applications.

Hot Salt. — Put a pint of powdered salt (the coarse cooking salt is the best for this purpose) into the fryingpan, or into the oven ; when the salt is very hot pour instantly into a flannel bag, and when suffering with pain apply to the stomach.

Hot Flannel, Wet. — Take a yard of flannel, fold it in three widths; then dip it in very hot water; wring it tolerably dry, and apply it evenly and neatly round and round the bowels; over this put a flannel bandage four yards long, and four inches wide.

Cold-Water Bandage. — Take a yard of flannel, fold it in three widths ; then dip it in cold water; wring it tolerably dry; apply evenly and neatly round the bowels; over this put an oiled silk bandage, sufficiently long and wide to completely swathe the bowels, and over that again put the double flannel bandage as above.

Alcohol Bandage for Sore Throat. — Take a strip of flannel sufficiently long to go three times round the throat; heat it, dip it in alcohol, and, when thoroughly soaked, fold it, and apply it to the throat; put over this a strip of oiled silk, and over that tie an old silk or linen handkerchief; this is a safe, easy, and soothing remedy for a sore throat. The bandage should be moistened from time to time with alcohol as it dries.

Red-Pepper Bandage. — Prepare as above, but dust the bandage lightly with red pepper before applying it to the throat; it will prove an admirable counter-irritant.

Barm-and-Oatmeal Poultice for Sore Throat. — Put half a teacupful of barm into a saucepan, and put it on the fire to boil; as soon as it boils take it off the fire, and stir oatmeal into it until it is of the consistency of a soft poultice; then place it on a rag, and apply it to the throat; carefully fasten it on with a bandage, two or three turns of the bandage going round the throat, and two or three over the crown of the head, so as to apply the poultice where it is wanted, that is to say, over the tonsils; tack the bandage, do not pin it. In scarlet fever the poultice should be changed three times a day.

Bread-and-Milk Poultice (Dr. Abernethy). — Scald a basin, for you can never make a good poultice unless you have perfectly boiling water; then, having put in some boiling water, throw in some coarsely crumbled bread, and cover it with a plate; when the bread has soaked up as much water as it will hold, drain off the remaining water, and there will be left a light pulp; spread it a third of an inch thick on folded linen, and apply when of the temperature of a warm bath; it may be said that this poultice will be very inconvenient if there is no lard in it, for it will soon get dry; but this is the very thing you want, and it can be easily moistened by dropping warm water on it, while a greasy poultice will be moist, but not wet.

Bran Poultice. — Stir bran into a vessel containing either a pint or a quart (according to the size of the poultice required) of boiling water, until it be of the consistency of a soft poultice; then put it into a flannel bag, and apply it to the part affected; when cool, dip it from time to time in hot water.

Linseed Poultice. — Stir linseed into a vessel containing either a pint or a quart of boiling water, and continue stirring steadily, but slowly, until it comes to a boil; then take the vessel instantly from the fire; spread the poultice half an inch thick on folded linen, and apply when the temperature is of blood heat; this is an excellent poultice. In cases of inflammation of the bowels it may be improved by the addition of two tablespoonf uls of mustard powder and a tablespoonful of olive-oil; the latter in-. gredient prevents it from drying too soon.

Flaxseed Poultice. — Is made as above, omitting the mustard and olive-oil.

Yeast Poultice (Dr. Abernethy). — One pound of flour; one ounce of yeast.

Mix with very hot water; keep stirring until beaten together, and spread on soft linen or cotton.

Linseed-Meal Poultice. — Scald the basin in which you

make the poultice, and then throw in a little finely ground linseed; pour a little hot water on it, and stir carefully until the mixture is quite smooth; proceed in this way until yon have a sufficient quantity, then spread the poultice on a piece of soft linen; it should be a quarter of an inch thick, and so wide that it will cover the inflamed part; put a bit of hog's lard in the centre of it, and when it begins to melt draw the edge of the knife over, and grease the surface of the poultice; when made in this way it is smooth and soft.

Alum Poultice. — Beat up the whites of two eggs with one drachm of alum ; afterwards drain it off from the unmixed portion of alum; put it between muslin, and apply it to sore eyes.

Hemlock Poultice. — Two drachms of dried hemlock; two pints of water boiled down to one; add sufficient linseed meal to make it of a proper consistency. Excellent for cancerous and scrofulous ulcers, and malignant sores.

Mustard Poultice. — Equal parts of flour of mustard and wheaten flour mixed with warm, not boiling, water.

Mutton - Suet Poultice. — Equal parts of rolled bread .crumbs and finely chopped mutton suet.

Put them in a saucepan with boiling water, and keep stirring over the fire until quite smooth; this is a very good soft poultice.

BOTTLED SAUCES, CATSUPS, VINEGARS, AND ESSENCES.

Curry Powder, No. 1. — Two tablespoonfuls of powdered ginger; one tablespoonful of fresh turmeric; three or four cloves; a blade of mace; two or three cardamom seeds; some cayenne and black pepper, and salt to taste. This is enough for a pair of chickens or a breast of mutton. Add two onions and a dessertspoonful of flour; pound all well in a mortar, stir into the gravy, and stew with the meat.

Curry Powder, No. 2. — Twelve ounces of coriander seed; six ounces of black pepper; one ounce and a half of cummin seed; three ounces of fenugreek; six ounces of pale turmeric.

Pound these ingredients very fine, and dry them in a Dutch oven, stirring them often; when cold, put into a dry jar, and cork it lightly.

Mushroom Powder. — Take large mushrooms; peel them, and take out the gills; dry them in an oven on tins, and, when dry, pound in a mortar.

India Sauce for Chops, No. 1. — One ounce of black pepper, pounded fine; half an ounce of allspice; one ounce of salt; half an ounce of grated horseradish; half an ounce of shallots, peeled and quartered.

Put these ingredients into a jar, pour over them a pint of either mushroom or walnut catsup, steep for a fortnight, then strain and bottle. A teaspoonful of this added to thick melted butter, or strong stock, makes a most acceptable sauce.

India Sauce, No. 2. — Two wineglassfuls of port wine; two wineglassfuls of walnut pickle; four wineglassfuls of mushroom catsup; half a dozen anchovies, boned, skinned, and pounded fine; half a dozen shallots, sliced and pounded; one tablespoonful of soy; half a drachm of cayenne pepper; one tablespoonful of brown sugar.

Let all simmer together gently for ten minutes; then strain, and, when cold, bottle, cork, and seal.

Table Sauce. — A bunch of tarragon. Put the tarragon in an earthen bowl; pour over it one pint of scalding-hot vinegar; cover it, and let it stand until the next day; then strain, and cork it tightly.

Caramel for Sauces. — Take some fine dry sugar and put it into a stewpan, without a drop of water; put it on the fire and stir continually until it has assumed a fine brown color; then take it from the fire, and pour on enough water to liquefy it; put the caramel thus prepared into a porcelain jar, which should be tightly closed; it can be used to color any brown sauce or soup.

Caramel with Bordeaux Wine for Sauces and Soups. — Prepare some sugar as above, and, before putting it on the fire, put in another stewpan a bottle of Bordeaux wine with the peel of a lemon; the Bordeaux wine should heat d bain-marie while the sugar is browning; when the sugar is browned pour over it the wine instead of water; stir until the sugar is melted; then strain and bottle; a teaspoonful of this is an addition to any soup.

Tincture of Cochineal (for coloring). — Cochineal, ten grains; proof spirit, one ounce.

Mix in a glass bottle, and steep; the cochineal takes a long time to dissolve, and the bottle must be frequently shaken.

Tincture of Celery (for flavoring). — Half an ounce of bruised celery seeds; two ounces of spirits of wine.

Put it into a bottle, cork, and let it stand near the tire for three or four days; a few drops will greatly improve broth or soup. The seed, in a muslin bag, may be boiled in soup.

Walnut Catsup. — Choose young, tender walnuts, prick with a needle in several places, and lay in a jar, with a handful of salt to every twenty-five, and water enough to cover them; break them with a billet of wood, and let them lie in the pickle a fortnight, stirring twice a day; drain off the liquor into a saucepan, and cover the shells with boiling vinegar to extract the juice; then crush to a pulp, and strain through a coarse sieve into the saucepan; allow for every quart of juice one ounce of black pepper, one ounce of ginger, half an ounce of cloves, half an ounce of nutmeg, one tiny pinch of cayenne, and one tiny pinch of burned sugar, all grated fine; half a shallot, chopped fine; one coffeespoonful of celery seed tied in a bag.

Boil all together for an hour if there be a gallon of the mixture; bottle when cold, stirring up from the bottom before filling each bottle.

Butternut Catsup. — Is made in precisely the same way.

Lemon Catsup. — Twelve large, fresh lemons; four tablespoonfuls of white mustard seed; one tablespoonful of turmeric; one tablespoonful of white pepper; one teaspoonful of cloves; one teaspoonful of mace; one saltspoonful of cayenne; two tablespoonfuls of white sugar; two tablespoonfuls of grated horseradish; one shallot, minced fine; juice of the lemons; two tablespoonfuls of fine salt.

Grind the spices, grate the rind of the lemons, and put all together, adding the horseradish; strew the salt over all; pour over the lemon juice, and let it stand; boil in a porcelain kettle half an hour; pour into a stone jar, cover closely, and let it stand fourteen days, stirring daily ; then strain, bottle, and seal.

Cucumber Catsup. — Take full-grown cucumbers and a third part of their weight of onions; pare and slice them; salt them well, and, in twenty-four hours, squeeze and strain them; to a quart of juice add a quart of white wine, and to every two quarts of liquor add three quarters of a pound of anchovies, white pepper, mace, a stick of horseradish, and a little grated nutmeg.

Boil all together until the anchovies are dissolved; then strain, and cover both spice and liquid until both are cold, when the spice should again be put into the catsup and bottled; it will keep for years; a small quantity will flavor all white dishes without injuring the color.

Tomato Catsup. — One peck of ripe tomatoes; one ounce of salt; one ounce of mace; one tablespoonful of black pepper; one teaspoonful of cayenne; one tablespoonful of cloves, powdered; seven tablespoonfuls of ground mustard; one tablespoonful of celery seed, tied in a thin muslin bag.

Cut slits in the tomatoes, put into a porcelain kettle, and boil until the juice is all extracted and the pulp dissolved; strain and press through a colander, then through a hair sieve; return to the fire, add the seasoning, and boil at least five hours, stirring constantly for the last hour, and frequently during the five hours; let it stand twelve hours in a stone jar on the cellar door ; when cold add a pint of strong vinegar; take out the bag of celery seed, and bottle, sealing the corks; keep in a cool, dark place.

Oyster Catsup. — One quart of oysters; one tablespoonful of salt; one teaspoonful of cayenne pepper, and the same of mace; one teacupful of cider or wine vinegar; one teacupful of sherry.

Chop the oysters and boil in their own liquor with a teacupful of vinegar, skimming the scum as it rises; boil three minutes; strain through a hair cloth; return the liquor to the fire; add the wine, pepper, salt, and mace; boil three minutes, and when cold, bottle for use, sealing the corks.

Mushroom Catsup. — Two quarts of mushrooms; a quarter of a pound of salt.

Lay in an earthenware pan alternate layers of mushrooms and salt; let them lie six hours; then break into bits; set in a cool place for three days, stirring thoroughly every morning; measure the juice when you have strained it, and to every quart add half an ounce of allspice, the same quantity of ginger, half a teaspoonful of powdered mace, and a teaspoonful of cayenne; put into a stone jar closely covered; set this in a saucepan of boiling water, and boil steadily and hard for five hours; then pour into a porcelain-lined kettle and boil an hour longer; let it stand all night in a cool place until settled and clear; pour off carefully from the sediment and put in small bottles, filling well, corking tight, sealing, and covering the corks with bladders.

Horseradish Vinegar. — Six tablespoonfuls of grated horseradish; one tablespoonful of white sugar; one quart of vinegar.

Scald vinegar and sugar, pour boiling hot over the horseradish; steep a week; strain and bottle.

Celery Vinegar. — One bunch of fresh celery, chopped fine, or a quarter of a pound of celery seed; one quart of the best vinegar; one teaspoonful of salt; one tablespoon f ul of white sugar.

Put the celery or seed into a jar; scald the vinegar, sugar and salt, and pour boiling hot over the celery; let it cool, cover it tightly, and set away. In a fortnight strain and put in small bottles, corking tightly.

Onion Vinegar. — Six large onions; one tablespoonful of salt; one tablespoonful of white sugar; one quart of the best vinegar.

Mince the onions, strew on the salt, and let them stand five or six hours; scald the vinegar in which the sugar has been dissolved, pour over the onions, put into a jar, tie down the cover, steep a fortnight, strain, and bottle.

Mock Capers. — Gather ripe green nasturtium seed, dry a day in the sun, put into small jars or wide-mouthed bottles, pour over them boiling vinegar duly salted, but lightly spiced, and when cold cork closely. Let them stand six weeks before using them.

Spiced Vinegar. — One quart of the best vinegar; one third of an ounce of celery seed; one third of an ounce of fresh sorrel; one third of an ounce of parsley; one third of an ounce of mint; one eighth of an ounce of dried elder flowers; two tablespoonfuls of white sugar; two shallots; one clove of garlic; three or four whole peppers; two cloves; a pinch of grated nutmeg; salt to taste; a teaspoonful of the best brandy.

Steep for one month in a well-covered earthen jar; then strain, filter, and bottle.

Pepper Vinegar (" Common-Sense in the Household "). — Six red-pepper pods broken up; three dozen black peppercorns; two tablespoonf uls of white sugar; one quart of the best vinegar.

Scald the vinegar in which the sugar has been dissolved, pour over the pepper, put into a jar, and steep a fortnight; strain and bottle.

Celery Salt. — Mix dried and grated celery root with one fourth its quantity of salt. This is a nice seasoning, and keeps a long time.

Spice Salt. — Quarter of an ounce of powdered thyme, bay leaf, and pepper; one eighth of an ounce each of marjoram and cayenne pepper; half an ounce each of powdered clove and nutmeg; add an ounce of salt to every four ounces of this powder. Mix thoroughly, and keep in an air-tight vessel.

Essence of Citron. — Oil of citron, thirty drops; proof spirit, one ounce.

Mix. Useful for flavoring sweets.

Essence of Mace. — Oil of mace, twenty drops; proof spirit, one ounce.

Mix. Useful for flavoring sweets, sauces, and mulled wine.

Essence of Caraway Seeds. — Oil of Caraway, one drachm; proof spirit, four drachms.

Mix. Useful for flavoring sweets.

Essence for Sauce Piquante. — Put into an earthen stewpan one bottleful of white wine; half a bottleful of the best vinegar; the juice of four lemons; powdered pepper, cloves, and mace; six laurel leaves; a little thyme and basil; thirty button onions peeled and sliced; one ounce of dried parsley; three cloves of garlic; two tablespoonfuls of brown sugar.

Heat almost to boiling; then put the stewpan on the hot coals, and keep it hot for eight hours; it must not, however, be allowed to boil; then strain it through a sieve, pressing it hard; when cool, filter it carefully, and pour it into small bottles, which should be carefully sealed; a very few drops of this essence will serve to flavor a sauce.

Essence of Spinach (for sauces). — Wash the spinach thoroughly through several waters; then cook it in a very little water, with some parsley and a few onion tops; when cooked, throw it instantly into very cold water, allow it to remain a few moments, and then put it into a clean, coarse muslin cloth, and press out the juice; the juice will be of a beautiful green color, and can be used for coloring puree of pease, pistachio cream, or any green sauce; if you wish to preserve it, it should be cooked d bain-marie, and strained through a sieve; the green deposit which remains in the sieve should be dried, put into a jar with a closely fitting lid, and kept in a cool place; it will regain color the moment it is put into broth or sauce.

Essence of Marjoram. — Essential oil of marjoram, twenty drops; proof spirit, one ounce. Mix. Useful for flavoring gravy.

Essence of Savory Spices. — Black pepper, one ounce; powdered allspice, half an ounce; grated nutmeg, quarter of an ounce; proof spirit, one pint.

Mix, and steep for ten days; then decant. Useful for flavoring savory dishes.

Essence of Orange or Lemon Peel (i. a, Zest). — Rub the yellow peel of fresh lemons or oranges with lumps of white sugar, and, when saturated, press them into a widemouthed bottle, and cork. Infinitely superior to dried peel for flavoring.

Roast Parsley (for sauces and stuffing). — The parsley should be fresh and crisp; as soon as possible after it is gathered it should be washed in cold water, and instantly dried with a clean cloth; it should then be placed on a gridiron, and roasted before — not over — the fire, which should be clear and fierce, so that the parsley may dry as quickly as possible; it will soon curl up, and dry, but will retain its fresh, green color; it can then be crumbled fine with the fingers, and put into a jar; it is extremely useful for sauces and stuffing, and prettier than chopped parsley, because it retains the color better.

Spiced Lard. — Put into a casserole three ounces of purified lard; three ounces of beef drippings, clarified; one and a half ounces of fresh butter; the juice of a large lemon; a laurel leaf; two cloves; two carrots; two onions chopped fine; some whole peppercorns; a pinch of allspice; salt to taste; a glass of strong broth.

Boil, stirring continually, until all the ingredients are dissolved and well mixed together; then add a little water, boil again, and skim carefully; strain through a coarse muslin cloth into porcelain jars, which should be tightly covered, and kept in a cool, dry place.

Made Mustard (" Common-Sense in the Household "). — Four tablespoonfuls of the best English mustard; two teaspoonfuls of salt; two teaspoonfuls of white sugar; one teaspoonful of white pepper; two teaspoonfuls of salad oil; enough tarragon vinegar to mix to a smooth paste; one small garlic pounded to a pulp.

Put the mustard in a bowl and wet with the oil, rubbing it with a wooden spoon until absorbed; wet with vinegar to a stiff paste; add salt, pepper, sugar, and garlic, and work all together thoroughly, wetting, little by little, with the vinegar until it is of the consistency of cake batter; beat hard for five minutes, put into wide-mouthed bottles, cover with a little oil, cork tightly, and set away in a cool place. It will keep for weeks, and is fit for use in a few days.

BOTTLED DRINKS.

Small Beer. — Fifteen gallons of water; five gallons of molasses; five pounds of wheat bran; half a pound of hops.

Boil the above ingredients together for three hours; strain the mixture into 'a clean cask, and when milkwarm pour in a quart of good yeast; shake it well, stop it close, and bottle when quite clear. The excellence of the beer depends upon putting in the yeast at the proper time; if too hot or too cold it will not ferment.

Boneset Beer. — Eight ounces of race ginger; two ounces of boneset; two ounces of horehound; one ounce of sassafras bark; one ounce of hops; eight gallons of water.

Pour the water boiling hot over the other ingredients, and let it stand for half an hour, well covered, to draw; then strain and sweeten to taste; put it into a keg, and add a teacupful of yeast; bung it tight.

Spruce Beer. — Two cupfuls of sugar; one cupful of molasses; thirty drops of oil of spruce; thirty drops of oil of sassafras; four quarts of cold, and four quarts of boiling water; one quart of homemade yeast.

Let it stand twelve hours, strain, bottle, and cork tightly.

Cream Beer. — Two pounds of loaf sugar; three pints of water; the whites of three eggs; cream tartar; half an ounce of wintergreen; the juice of one lemon; half a cupful of sifted flour, beaten smooth in water.

Boil the sugar, acid, and flour in the water for five minutes; when nearly cold add the whites of the eggs, essence, and lemon; bottle and keep in a cool place; use two tablespoonfuls in half a tumbler of water and a little soda.

Cream Ginger Beer. — One ounce of race ginger, bruised and boiled in one pint of water fifteen minutes; one handful of hops boiled as above; three large lemons, sliced; ten quarts of cold water; three pounds of loaf sugar; one pint of fresh potato yeast.

Mix the ginger, hops, lemons, and water together; then mix the loaf sugar and yeast well together, and add to the other ingredients; strain and bottle, and it is ready for use.

Ginger Beer. — Put into a large crock four pounds of loaf sugar; two ounces of pounded ginger; the rinds of five lemons.

Pour over the above ingredients five gallons of boiling hot spring-water; then beat up the whites of five eggs with the juice of the five lemons, and mix with the liquor; when it is milkwarm add two tablespoonfuls of barm; cover it close for four days; then strain and bottle it in stone bottles, taking care not to fill them quite full. It is fit for use in five or six days.

Beer. — Three pounds of brown sugar; two nutmegs, grated; one teaspoonful of ground cloves; one teaspoonfnl of ground cinnamon; one teaspoonful of cream of tartar; one pint of baker's yeast.

Mix these ingredients, add three quarts of water, let it stand in a warm place all night, skim it, and it is fit for use.

Sassafras Beer. — One teaspoonful of sassafras; the grated rind and pulp of three lemons; one pint of hop water; four pounds of loaf sugar; four gallons of water; one pint of good yeast.

Put the sassafras, hop water, and lemons together, and let stand until the flavor of the lemons is imparted; then add the sugar, water, and yeast; when well risen, strain and bottle.

Wine Bitters. — Two ounces of orange peel; two ounces of sweet fennel; one ounce of gentian, sliced fine; one ounce of cardamom seed, bruised; one ounce of camomile flowers; one drachm of cochineal; one gallon of brandy.'

Put all these ingredients into the brandy. In one month the bitters will be fit for use. The brandy can be poured off, and another gallon of bitters made from the same ingredients.

A very fine Bitters for Ague Regions. — One ounce of gentian root; one ounce of orange peel; one ounce of juniper berries; three quarters of an ounce of cardamom seeds; one gallon of whiskey.

Shake frequently, and it will be ready for use in a few days. It may be replenished by adding more spirits, as it diminishes by use, to the extent of a quart.

Cherry Bounce, No. 1. — One gallon of the juice of ripe cherries; four pounds of loaf sugar; spice, cinnamon, and cloves to taste.

Pound the cherries with their stones in a mortar, and strain them through a coarse sieve or cloth; then put the sugar, juice, and spice on the fire; let the ingredients come slowly to a boil, and, after the actual boiling begins, add one quart of brandy and one pint of rum, and pour into stone bottles or jugs. Cork the jugs tightly, and keep them in a cool place.

Cherry Bounce, No. 2. — One gallon of cherry juice (prepared as above); half a gallon of French brandy or rum; one pound of loaf sugar; a very little cinnamon.

Put all the ingredients together and let them stand. The bounce will be ready for use in four or five months.

To Bottle Cider. — For one hogshead of cider take one gallon of good French brandy; half an ounce of cochineal; one pound of alum; three pounds of rock candy.

Pound all well in a mortar, and put them in the brandy for a day or two; then mix the whole with the cider, and stop it close for six months, after which, if fine, bottle it off. The brandy will keep the bottles from bursting.

Artificial Cider. — One gallon of hot water; one pound of brown sugar; half an ounce of cream of tartar.

Pour the mixture into a jug, let it stand till lukewarm, and add three tablespoonfuIs of yeast; shake all well together; let it stand twenty-four hours, and then cork it tight.

Kentucky Blackberry Cordial. — Fresh blackberries, well washed and picked.

Put them in a kettle with just enough water to simmer them, and when soft mash and put them in a flannel bag to drain; then for every pint of juice add one half pound of sugar, clarify with white of an egg, and strain; to every quart of syrup add one pint of good brandy.

Blackberry Cordial (William Penn's). — Two quarts of blackberry juice; one pound of loaf sugar; half an ounce of nutmeg, grated; half an ounce of stick cinnamon; half an ounce of cloves; half an ounce of allspice.

Boil all together for half an hour, strain, and when cold add a pint of fourth-proof brandy; bottle and cork well.

Ginger Cordial. — Four pounds of red currants, picked and strung; the juice of three lemons and grated rind of one; eight ounces of ginger, not bruised; one ounce of sweet almonds, blanched and pounded to a paste; one ounce of bitter almonds, blanched and pounded to a paste; one gallon of whiskey.

Put all the ingredients together in a large earthenware jar, cover, and let them stand six weeks; then strain carefully, and mix with a syrup made by boiling four pounds of crushed white sugar with one quart of water; clarify with beaten white of egg; after being clarified, this syrup should be poured boiling hot into the strained cordial, stirring carefully all the time; when quite cold, bottle, and set away for use.

Black-Currant Cordial. — Bruise the currants well, and put them over the fire with a little water and sugar; boil up once; then squeeze through a flannel bag and strain again; to each quart of juice add one pint of water; to every ten quarts of this add fourteen pounds of sugar; put over the fire, and after it has come to a boil allow it to boil three minutes; then take from the fire, and add whiskey in the proportion of three pints of whiskey to every seven pints of juice.

Mississippi Pomegranate Cordial. — Separate the fruit from the core, and mash it sufficiently to obtain juice enough to keep the fruit from burning; steam it slowly over the fire in a porcelain kettle until all the juice is extracted from the seeds; then strain the juice from the seeds, and allow to each gallon of juice two pounds of loaf sugar and half a gallon of good spirits; bottle closely, and let it stand several months before using it.

Mint Cordial. — One gallon of the best brandy; two large handfuls of mint.

Put the brandy and mint into a stone jar, and let it stand for twenty-four hours; then take the mint out and press it gently, adding the same quantity of fresh mint to the brandy; soak again for twenty-four hours; then strain the liquor, and add to each pint of liquor three

quarters of a pound of loaf sugar; when the sugar is dissolved let it stand a little while to settle, and bottle it.

Kirsch. — Take a pound of wild plums, mash them, and take out the stones and crack them; throw them in a gallon of brandy; let them steep ii month; filter, and you have the famous kirsch. Syrup, added to taste, makes a delicious cordial.

Raspberry Cordial. — Dissolve three pounds of sugar in a pint and a half of raspberry juice; add half a pound of mashed ripe cherries and one quart of good brandy; strain and filter.

Maraschino. — Dissolve four pounds of sugar in a quart of water; add a quart of alcohol; filter and pour into bottles; add to each bottle just enough essence of bitter almonds to flavor.

Ouracoa. — Six bitter oranges; the grated rind of four.

Put this to steep a week in a quart of alcohol with two cloves, a spoonful of cinnamon, and a teaspoonful of mace; strain, and add a syrup made of six pounds of sugar dissolved in three pints of water; leave it a month, and bottle it.

Lemon Punch to Keep. — Twelve lemons; the peel of twelve lemons shaved very thin; one gallon of water; two pounds of loaf sugar; one quart of the best whiskey.

Boil the rinds of the twelve lemons in a gallon of water until the flavor is extracted; squeeze the lemons over the loaf sugar, and add them to the water after straining the peel from it; stir in the whiskey, and bottle for use.

Orgeat. — Half a pound of almonds, blanched and pounded in a mortar, and mixed with a little rose water; one quart of boiling water.

When nearly cold, strain, sweeten, and flavor with rose water.

Milk Punch to Keep. — Half a gallon of the best white brandy; half a gallon of rum; three pounds of white loaf sugar, grated; two grated nutmegs; the juice of eighteen lemons; two quarts of boiling milk; five quarts of cold water.

Soak the rinds of the lemons in the rum and brandy for forty-eight hours; then strain the liquor; add first the sugar, then the lemon juice, then the nutmeg, then the cold water, and, last of all, and when the other ingredients have been thoroughly mixed, the boiling milk; stir steadily all the time; when mixed, strain through a flannel bag. Filtering through paper will make it bright. Bottle for use, as it will keep any length of time.

Currant Shrub. — Press the juice from the currants without heating them; put it in a dry, warm place to undergo a slight fermentation; after a few days remove the scum from the top, and use the clear part of the juice, leaving the thick scum at the bottom. To a pint of clear juice add two pounds of the best white crushed sugar; when dissolved, scald all together for a moment and bottle the mixture. It will keep for two years, and, mixed with water, is a refreshing drink.

Lemon Syrup. — One quart of lemon juice; three pounds of loaf sugar.

Boil to a syrup; when it has boiled thoroughly, pour it hot over the rinds of the lemons and let it cool; then strain and bottle for use. Excellent.

Lime Syrup. — Prepare as above, adding a . little more sugar if necessary. Delicious with iced soda water.

Raspberry Vinegar. — One quart of ripe berries; one quart of strong vinegar.

Put the raspberries into a bowl, pour on them a quart of strong vinegar, let it stand twenty-four hours, then strain through a flannel bag, and pour this liquor on another quart of berries; do this for three or four days successively, and strain it; make it very sweet with loaf sugar, bottle, and seal it.

Raspberry Royal. — Four quarts of ripe berries; one quart of the best cider vinegar; one pound of white sugar; one pint of fine brandy.

Put the berries into a stone jar and mash them to a pulp; add enough of the best cider vinegar to cover the fruit well; stand in the sun four hours; strain, squeeze out the juice, and put in the brandy; seal in bottles, and lay them on their sides in the cellar; cover the bottles with sawdust; pour two tablespoonfuls to a tumblerful of icewater.

Black-Currant Wine. — One gallon of whiskey; four quarts of black currants; four pounds of brown or white sugar; one tablespoonful of cloves; one tablespoonful of cinnamon.

Crush the currants, and let them stand in the whiskey with the spices for three weeks;' then strain and add the sugar; set away again for three weeks longer; then strain and bottle.

Red-Currant Wine. — Take fresh and very ripe currants, pick, string, and mash them, and add to every quart of juice three quarters of a pound of white sugar, and half a pint of water.

Stir all together long and well, put into a clean cask, leaving out the bung, and covering the whole with a bit of lace or mosquito net; let it ferment about four weeks; when quite still strain and bottle.

Blackberry Wine. — One quart of strained juice of the ripe berry; two quarts of water; allow three pounds of sugar to every gallon of the liquid, and set it away to ferment; skim it every day for three weeks, and then put it into a keg or jug; at Christmas it may be drained off and bottled for use; the older it grows the better it will be. This receipt will serve for grapes, except that hot water is used — one pint only to a gallon of juice.

Elderberry Wine. — One quart of juice; one quart of water; half a pound of loaf sugar.

Let it stand in an open vessel for twenty-four hours; then strain it carefully into bottles, and cork them tight.

Rhubarb Wine. — Five pounds of rhubarb cut into small pieces; one gallon of water. Let it stand for ten days, stirring it twice a day; then strain it through a sieve, and add four pounds of loaf sugar to a gallon; put it into a clean cask, and let it remain five months; then add the rind and juice of three lemons; half a pint of brandy, and half an ounce of isinglass; in a few days it maybe bottled, putting two raisins into each bottle; cork and seal the bottles.

Strawberry Wine. — To the juice of three quarts of strawberries, mashed and strained, add for each quart of juice one quart of water; one pound of loaf sugar.

Stir up well, and ferment in a clean, sweet cask, leaving the bung out; when quite quiet strain into bottles, and cork for use.

Cranberry Wine. — To two quarts of ripe cranberries, mashed to a pulp, add one quart of water; stir well, and let it stand for two days; strain through a double-flannel bag; mash two more quarts of berries, and pour this juice over; steep two days more; strain; add one pound of loaf sugar for three quarts of liquor, and boil five minutes; let it ferment in lightly covered jars; strain and bottle. Said to be good for scrofula.

Raisin Wine. — One pound of white sugar; two pounds of raisins seeded and chopped; one lemon, all the juice, and half the grated peel; two gallons of boiling water.

Put all into a stone jar, and stir every day for a week; then strain and bottle; it will be fit for use in ten days.

Florida Orange Wine. — Twenty gallons of water; sixty pounds of loaf sugar; twenty quarts of orange juice.

Boil the sugar and water, skimming it until the foam disappears; then let it cool, and, when quite cold, add the orange juice; put it in a cask with a piece of leaven, and leave it uncorked, to ferment, for about six weeks, or until it ceases to work; then cork it tight, and leave it undisturbed for six months, when it is fit to be bottled.

MISCELLANEOUS SAVORY DISHES.

ENTREES.

Potted Beef. — Two pounds of tender beef without fat or skin; beat it; then put it into a covered jar with two ounces of butter, two tablespoonfuls of water, and a blade of mace.

Bake slowly until thoroughly cooked; pound in mortar while hot, adding the gravy, with a quarter of a pound of butter; flavor with pepper, salt, and essence of anchovy; press it tightly into pots, and cover with butter.

Chicken Cream. — Take one pound of the white part of a chicken and a quarter of a pound of ham; mince; pound in mortar, and pass through a sieve; add two ounces of fresh butter, three eggs well beaten, and half a pint of whipped cream; flavor to taste with salt, ground mace, and the merest soupgon of cayenne; also, essence of celery.

Pound all well together again, put into buttered scallop shells, and bake; or steam in buttered mould for twenty minutes, and serve with bechamel, oyster, celery, or tomato sauce.

Hot Marrow-bones. — Choose some good marrow-bones; scrape clean, and boil until the marrow is tender and luscious; then take out the bones, dry them carefully, and envelop each in white paper ruffed at each end as for ham. Tie a ribbon around each one, arrange on a hot plate, and hand with hot toast, cut into squares, to each guest; the marrow is then emptied on the toast, and eaten with salt and pepper. This is a delicious relish.

Creates a la Moelle de JSantf. — Lay in cold water for two hours two or three pieces of beef marrow from five to six inches long; then put them in a stewpan, and cook in a little bouillon; boil for some minutes; then withdraw the stewpan from the hot fire; a quarter of an hour afterwards drain the marrow, cut into small pieces, spread on hot toast, season with salt and cayenne, dust with a little powdered chives, arrange on a napkin, and serve hot,

Boar, Wild, in Dolceforte. — Take cutlets of wild boar, trim, clean, and put them to soak for six hours in a bath of the finest olive-oil (just enongh to cover them), with a little salt, pepper, grated nutmeg, powdered cinnamon, two or three shallots, a small clove of garlic, some chopped parsley, and a little lemon juice; cover closely, and leave six hours in a cool place; then wipe perfectly dry, and put them into a saucepan with a little lean ham sliced thin, and a piece of fresh butter; cook until they are a light brown on both sides; then cover with beefsteak, and stew until tender; then drain; place on a hot plate, and cover with the following sauce, called Dolceforte: Half a tumblerful of powdered sugar; three quarters of a tumblerful of strong vinegar; one coffeecupful of Sultana raisins, seeded; one coffeecupful of pinocchi, t. e., pine nuts (blanched almonds may be substituted); half a cake of the best chocolate, grated.

Mix; throw into the gravy in which the wild boar has cooked, boil up once, thicken with rolled bread crumbs, pour over the boar, and serve; garnish with sliced lemon.

Breakfast Brawn. — Cut into small pieces and simmer half an ox foot, twenty peppercorns, six allspice berries, three cloves, a blade of mace, two button onions in a tumblerful of water for an hour, until the gelatinous substance is quite soft; strain the liquor, and add half a teacupful of rich pork or veal gravy; stir all together, and keep lukewarm until the meat is ready for the mould; but first pour in a little gravy to cover and jelly in the bottom of the mould, while you are cutting up the meat, which will make it turn out with a nice jelly on top; cut into small, neat pieces half a pound of any kind of cooked or tinned meat, or tongue; if bacon or a little fat pork is liked, boil a little with the ox foot, and cut it up with the other meat; season the meat well with pepper and salt, mix the gravy among it, and press it down firmly into the mould; when cold it should turn out a nice shape of meat encased in jelly.

Scrambles. — Mince a small tin of chicken, or a small boiled chicken, with a quarter of a ponnd of boiled bacon, three small pickled gherkins, and six pickled onions; season highly with pepper and salt, and a very little nutmeg; pour in a teacupf ul of good gravy in which sufficient gelatine has been dissolved to make it jelly, when cold, with a teaspoonful of made mustard; butter some teacups, and, after placing at the bottom of each a tiny red star of beet root, pour in the mixture; if a dozen scrambles are made, half of them can be garnished in this way, and half with stars made out of the white of egg boiled. In this manner can be made quite a novel and piquant dish for luncheon.

Potted Chicken. — Pound some tinned or boiled chicken (freed from bone) in a mortar; boil an egg quite hard, rub the yolk to powder, and mix it to a smooth, creamy liquid with three tablespoonfuls of rich cream, and a teaspoonful of sugar; add, drop by drop, a tablespoonful of white vinegar, beating all the time; mince a small button onion, and leave for an hour in the mixture to draw out the flavor; then strain, incorporate thoroughly with the chicken, which shape into a cone or mound; garnish with a wreath of watercress, and serve; this quantity is sufficient for a pound of chicken, and makes an agreeable change for breakfast or luncheon.

Brother Jonathan. — Make a mush of Indian meal, adding enough wheat flour to prevent the pieces from breaking when they are sliced; make the mush the day before it is wanted, and set it to cool in a deep pan, that the slices may be large enough; turn out the cool mass, and cut it in slices; then, with the top of a teacup, cut out circles like shortcake; put these little circles round a plate or dish, in a row; then add another row on top of these, and so on until you form a low pyramid; sprinkle each row freely with rich grated cheese; dot the top row thickly with bits of butter, and dust with grated bread crumbs and red pepper; brown in a quick oven, and serve in the dish in which it is baked. Two or three yolks of eggs stirred into the mush while warm will add to the richness.

Green Butter. — Two ounces of parsley picked from the stalk, boiled till tender, and the juice pressed from it; two ounces of anchovy fish, washed, boned, and pounded fine; four ounces of fresh butter to be thoroughly mixed with the parsley and anchovy, and passed through a very fine, clean sieve; press into shape like a cream cheese, and keep in the cold until wanted.

Green Cream Cheese. — Two ounces of parsley, washed, dried, and roasted before a clear, fierce fire until it can be crumbled to a fine green powder; one ounce of fresh watercress, washed, dried, and chopped very fine; one ounce of celery pounded to a pulp; blend all thoroughly and smoothly with four ounces of fresh cream cheese; pass through a fine, clean sieve; salt to taste; add the faintest soupcon of cayenne; then press into shapes like tiny cream cheeses, and keep in a cold place until wanted. SIMPLE ENTKEES.

Brewis. — Half a loaf of stale white or brown bread; put into the saucepan with any joint of boiled salt beef, and allow to simmer with it till well soaked through and perfectly soft; turn out into a vegetable dish, and keep hot by the side of the fire until the meat is ready; serve with it. This is a well-known Scotch dish, and an excellent accompaniment to boiled beef.

Savory Rice. — Thoroughly boil a large cupful of rice; have ready a buttered pie-dish, and a pint and a half of good strong stock; drain the rice; turn it into a pie-dish; pour the stock over it; add a seasoning of pepper, salt, and butter; place it in the oven for ten minutes, and serve very hot.

Aspic Jelly. — Put two calf's feet, a knuckle bone of veal, and a shank of ham into a stewpan with a pint and a half, or rather more, of good stock; stew this down to a glaze; then pour on it a pint and a half more stock; add to this a sprig of parsley, one onion, two or three cloves, three carrots, two or three bay leaves, a little salt, and let it stew for six hours more, skimming it well; strain it into a basin to get cold; then put the four whites of eggs with the strained juice of two lemons into a stewpan, add the jellied stock, and heat it over the fire until the mixture is on the point of boiling; next remove the stewpan to the side, and place fire on the top of it; let it stand about twenty minutes more; after this strain it through a jelly bag until quite clear, when it will be fit for use.

Jellied Chicken. — Soak an ounce of gelatine in a teacupful of cold water for twenty minutes, squeeze it quite dry, and melt it in a pint of clear stock in which a large tablespoonful of marjoram and half a rind of a lemon have been simmered for ten minutes; season to taste with salt and pepper, and strain the liquor; cover the bottom of a mould half an inch thick with gravy, and, when nicely set in jelly, place upon it slices of hard-boiled egg, prettily cut beets, pickled gherkins and cucumbers in ornamental shapes; mince together finely two pounds of chicken, half a pound of cooked ham, and half a pound of boiled tongue; season and press this firmly into a compact lump, and put it into the mould in such a manner that it leaves an inch of space round every side, this space being filled with the gravy, which should not be poured in until quite cool, so that it may jelly quickly and preserve the shape of the meat. This dish can be made very pretty, and in cold weather will keep for a week.

Ragout of Livers (Augustin's entree). — Prepare your chicken livers carefully, and have them whole; bleach them a moment in boiling water, and put them immediately in a saucepan with gravy or bouillon, half a glassful of white wine, a bunch of parsley, half a clove of garlic, salt and pepper; let it boil half an hour, skim it carefully, take out the soup bunch, thicken the sauce with a little flour, and serve.

Salpieon (Madame Eugene's entree). — Make a white roux; moisten it with bouillon and a glassful of white wine; add a soup bunch, salt, and pepper; let it boil and thicken; take for your ragout equal portions of whatever cold meats, fowl, game, livers, ham and tongue, mushrooms, bottoms of artichokes, you may have, and cut them in little dice; let them simmer and color; take out the soup bunch; thicken the sauce with a little flour if necessary; fill little pates and vol au vents, and serve.

Crowds Fried Chicken. — Cut up your chicken, wipe it carefully, season it with salt and pepper, and sprinkle lightly with flour; throw in, piece by piece, in boiling lard; drain on brown paper; serve it surrounded by fried parsley.

Ravioli. — Make a paste with fresh eggs, flour, and a little salt; roll it out very thin, and powder it very lightly with flour; cut up any cold meats you have — game, poultry, or butcher's meat; season highly; bind it with the yellow of an egg, and put at equal distances, on half the sheet of paste, a spoonful of the mixture; cover with the other sheet of paste, press the paste carefully around each spoonful of stuffing, and cut them apart; throw them into boiling bouillon for five minutes, and serve with grated cheese.

Chicken-and-Com Pudding. — Cut up a chicken and fricassee it with a rich sauce; boil a dozen ears of corn, cut it off the cob, season with salt and pepper, a piece of butter as large as an egg, and beat in five eggs and enough milk to make it the right consistency; butter a deep baking-dish and put in a layer of the corn pudding, then the chicken and sauce, and, last, another layer of corn pudding; bake, and serve hot.

Milanaise Croquettes. — Cut up equal parts of chicken, tongue, truffles, and macaroni in little dice; mix together with a white sauce and grated Parmesan cheese; serve in scallop shells.

Neapolitan Chicken Livers. — Take the best Neapolitan macaroni, Parmesan cheese, fresh butter, and two dozen chicken livers; chop the livers, with celery, salt and pepper, and eschalottes; blanch your macaroni in boiling water, and drain; in the meantime cook your livers and seasonings in a saucepan with butter; then put alternate layers of macaroni and liver and Parmesan cheese in a baking-dish, and cover with grated cheese; bake over a slow fire, and serve.

Bombay Curry. — Any cold cooked meat or fowl, well floured; add pepper and salt, a little ham and bacon, and a little soup meat; fry two chopped onions and put in the stewpan, adding a tablespoonful of curry powder, the same of pea flour, some cold boiled potatoes, peeled and sliced apples, and rice; put all these in a stewpan with a little butter and salt, and enough bouillon to moisten all; the vegetables, rice, etc., must be put in first; the meat some ten minutes later; stew until all the ingredients are thoroughly cooked.

Madras Curry. — Two heaping teaspoonfuls of curry paste; one and a half pounds of apples, sliced and stewed until soft; two ounces of butter; half a teaspoonful of Worcestershire sauce; two teaspoonfuls of lemon juice; one teaspoonful of Liebig's extract; one teacupful of rice; salt and cayenne pepper to taste; enough bouillon to cover all.

Let all stew together until soft; then add the fowl, which should previously be cut up and fried lightly in butter; - stew until all the ingredients are thoroughly cooked; garnish with slices of lemon, and serve.

Russian Bread Croquettes. — Take some well-risen dough; roll it out on the bread-board with a little fresh butter, kneading and rolling again and again, until the butter is thoroughly incorporated with the dough; then roll out into a sheet and cut into rounds with a tumbler; place a spoonful of any good savory hash in the middle of each round, and fold the paste over carefully so as td enclose the hash completely; brush the outside of the paste with beaten white of egg, and drop the croquettes so prepared into boiling fat; when fried to a light brown, remove with a perforated strainer; drain on white paper, remove to a hot dish, dust with pepper and salt, and serve.

Croquettes of Spinach. — Wash the spinach carefully through several waters, chop it fine, and put it into a porcelain saucepan with some fresh butter, a little marjoram, parsley, salt and pepper to taste, a spoonful of white sugar, and the grated rind of half a lemon; put the saucepan on the fire, adding a tumblerful of milk, and cook slowly until all the milk is absorbed; withdraw the saucepan from the fire, and when the spinach is somewhat cooled add two eggs, beaten light; stir all well together, and then flour your hands and proceed to shape the croquettes, dipping them afterwards in beaten white of egg and rolled bread crumbs; when all are breaded, drop them into boiling fat and fry a light brown; dust with pepper and salt, and serve.

Croquettes de Fines Heroes. — Are made exactly as above, using beet tops instead of spinach, and adding a small quantity of as many different sweet herbs as possible.

Farina Croquettes. — Boil some farina in milk with a little salt until it is quite thick; then take the stewpan from the fire, and when the farina is somewhat cooled, add some eggs, beaten light; beat these well and smoothly into the farina, and then shape the croquettes, which should be small oval balls; roll in beaten white of egg, then in bread crumbs, and fry a light brown.

Wet Devil. — Any cold meat or fowl; one teaspoonful of currant jelly; one mustardspoonful of made mustard; one tablespoonful of tomato catsup; one tablespoonful of mushroom; one dessertspoonful of Worcestershire sauce; a teaspoonful of Harvey sauce; a glassful of red wine.

Mix, and send to table red-hot.

Curried Fish. — One teaspoonful of curry powder, with raw rice pounded fine; two cloves of garlic; a pinch of ginger; a few peppercorns; a little turmeric; half an onion; butter, stock, and a dessertspoonful of vinegar; also a tiny pinch of sugar; this can be served with any kind of cold fish; in stewing, the fish, of course, should be put in last.

Kedgeree, No. 1. — Boil two tablespoonfuls of rice, and drain it as dry as possible; have ready some cooked fish, boned, skinned, and pulled into small pieces.

Mix this thoroughly with the rice, and heat over the fire; then beat up an egg very light, and stir well into the rice and fish; add white pepper, cayenne, and salt to taste.

Kedgeree, No. 2. — Four ounces of well-boiled rice, dry and tender; put into a saucepan with fish as above, an ounce or two of fresh butter, full seasoning of cayenne, and salt to taste.

Stir the kedgeree constantly over a clear fire until very hot; then mingle quickly with it two lightly beaten eggs; stir quickly again, put on hot dish, and serve.

Stewed Kidneys. — Lay them in salt and water for a few minutes; cut off the outside, or meat; slice thinly; put them into a stewpan with a little water, and cook until tender; then add pepper, salt, butter, and a little browned flour for thickening; last of all a glassful of port wine, and a little roasted powdered parsley.

Kidneys d la Vieville. — Proceed as above, stewing them in a little melted butter instead of water, adding also some chopped shallots; when they are almost cooked, season with salt and cayenne; then take them out and drain them; meanwhile pour into the casserole in which the kidneys were cooked a wineglassful of Madeira, and an equal quantity of strong stock; let the sauce come to a boil, and thicken with a little sauce Espagnole; let it boil up once, then add the kidneys, two spoonfuls of cooked ham cut into dice, and a pinch of chopped tarragon; stir and put into a hot dish, surrounding them with fried crusts of bread.

Devilled Kidneys. — Parboil in a little salt and water; then pass on a skewer and roast in a Dutch oven, basting with butter and water; dust with a little mustard and cayenne before roasting, or stew tender in salt and water; drain and pour over the sauce for a "Wet Devil."

Russian Kromeskys. — Mince fine cold game, fowl, or fish, adding ham or tongue if possible, also mushrooms and truffles; put all together in a stewpan with white sauce, yolk of an egg, and a little grated nutmeg, pepper, salt, and chopped onion; stir a moment, then spread on a platter to cool; then divide into small pieces, and roll into the form of a cork; fold each in a thin slice of boiled bacon, dip in butter, and fry quickly; they should be done in a wire basket, then drained and served with fried parsley.

Marrow Patties. — Take some beef marrow, melt it and strain it through a sieve; when it is cold add to it two eggs thoroughly beaten, some bread crumbs finely crumbled, and soaked in bouillon or stock, and lastly a very little grated parsley, salt to taste, and a soupcon of nutmeg; if still too thin, add flour enough to thicken it; bake in open shells of puff paste.

Stuffed Peppers. — Six (or more) large green peppers, perfectly fresh; cut off the tops and carefully scrape out the inside; scrape off the inside of the tops as well, being, however, particularly careful to preserve the shape of the pepper. Prepare the filling as follows: Chop very fine some cold chicken or veal, and put it into a saucepan with a small red-pepper pod, a little white pepper, salt, melted butter, and enough milk to moisten all; stir continually until it is boiling hot; then put a teaspoonful of boiling melted butter and lemon juice into each pepper; fill quickly with the hot mince; put on the top of the pepper; arrange in a hot dish, and serve. This is an easy, pretty, and appetizing entree.

Spaniards d la Grecque; or, Spanish Onions d la Grecque. — Peel off the outer skins; cut off the pointed ends; put them in a deep dish, and place a piece of butter, and a little salt and pepper on the place where the point has been cut off; cover them with a plate or dish, and let them bake not less than three hours. They will throw out a delicious gravy.

Pepperpot (India receipt). — Two tablespoonfuls of cassareepe to a pint of good stock; add pepper, salt, onions, chopped fine, ochra, and thyme; the first meat put into the pot should be salt pork; add goose, duck, chicken, game, or any kind of meat; the first day stew for two hours, the next day until the meat is reduced to rags.

Pie d la Bonne Minagere. — Slices of cold beef, mutton, chicken, and bacon; lay them in a deep dish with sliced apples, and a very little chopped onion placed in alternate layers with the meat; season with pepper, salt, and a tablespoonful of brown sugar; pour in some good stock; cover with short crust, and bake slowly.

Potato Pie. — Skin some potatoes; cut them into slices, and season them; also some mutton, beef, or veal; put layers of potatoes and meat; add enough stock to moisten all; cover with short crust and bake.

Podovies, or Beef Patties. — Shred underdone dressed beef with a little fat; season with pepper, salt, and a little chopped onion; make a plain paste, roll it thin, cut into small squares, fill with the mince, fold over and bake to a nice brown.

Giblet Pie. — After very nicely cleaning geese or duck giblets, stew them with a small quantity of water, chopped onion, celery, black pepper, and a bunch of sweet herbs until nearly done; let them grow cold, and chop up with them some cold chicken and ham or veal; line a deep pie-dish with short crust, and fill with alternate layers of the giblets and mince, sliced potatoes, and sliced apples, pouring over all the liquors in which the giblets were stewed; cover with paste with an aperture in the top and bake; the moment the pie is withdrawn from the oven, pour into the aperture a teacupful of good cream; serve hot.

Calf's-head Pie. — One calf's head boiled an hour, and, when cold, sliced; two pounds of beef, boiled down to a jelly; salt, pepper, mace, and cayenne to taste.

Put some seasoning in the bottom of a dish, then a layer of calf's head, then the beef jelly, and more spice; another layer of calf's head and jelly, and so on, the last layer being the calf's tongue, sliced thin; cover with good paste and bake.

Ravioli of Herbs. — Take a quantity of beet tops, wash them carefully, throwing aside the coarser leaves; then boil them for from fifteen to twenty minutes; when cooked, throw instantly into very cold water, and after a moment or two press them dry with a clean cloth; when dry, they should be chopped as finely as possible; then put them in an earthen stewpan, adding four eggs well beaten, two ounces of grated Parmesan cheese, two and a half ounces of cream cheese, or curds, a little salt, and a soupcon of nutmeg; let all cook together for a few moments, stirring steadily all the time; then place on the moulding-board (which should be well floured), and, after flouring your hands, proceed to mould the ravioli into small oval balls, the size of a large Spanish olive; be particularly careful to flour them well; when all are moulded, drop them, a few at a time, into boiling broth; watch closely, and take them out with a perforated strainer the moment they assume a light-brown color; drain for a few moments, and serve on a very hot dish, with tomato sauce poured over them.

Risotto, with Oysters. — Four dozen small oysters, stewed; one onion, chopped fine; one half pound of rice, picked, washed, soaked for an hour, and drained dry.

Fry the chopped onion to a light brown in butter, then remove the onion, and throw the rice into the frying-pan for a moment only, shaking it about well; then put it with the onion into a saucepan, covering it with the liquor in which the oysters have been cooked; allow this to come to a boil, then withdraw the rice to the side of the fire, cover it closely, and cook slowly; when tender, drain, add the oysters, salt, a pinch of cayenne, and a tablespoonful of butter; toss about until the butter is thoroughly melted, then arrange in a pyramid on a very hot dish; dust thickly with fried bread crumbs, and serve.

Risotto a la Neapolitaine. — One onion, chopped fine, and fried lightly in butter; one large tomato, peeled, seeded, and sliced; one pound of good rice, picked, washed, and dried; a few button mushrooms, chopped fine; a few boiled shrimps chopped fine; four or five handfuls of grated Parmesan cheese; a tiny pinch of cayenne.

Put the onion into a saucepan with a little butter, add the rice, tomato, and some bouillon, thrice as much bouillon as rice; cook for twenty minutes, then take from the fire and sift in the cheese; add also the mushrooms, shrimps, and seasoning; cover closely, cook for two minutes, then serve in a very hot dish.

Risotto for Epicures, or Risotto con Rigaglia. — One teaspoonful of chopped onion ; four teaspoonfuls of melted beef marrow; five ounces of good, fresh butter; three to four ounces of grated Parmesan cheese; one half pound of the best rice, washed and dried; three smoked sausages.

Put the onion and beef marrow into a saucepan, and after two or three minutes add the rice, covering it to three times its height in the saucepan with good bouillon; add the sausages, and cook over rather a strong fire until the rice is almost dry; then take it from the fire, remove the sausages, and stir in the butter and cheese, also two or three teaspoonfuls of strong stock; cover closely and set in a warm place. Meanwhile cook some cocks' combs, chicken livers, and kidneys in a little salt and water until tender; these form the rigaglia/ peel two or three black truffles, and put the peel into a saucepan with half a glassful of Spanish wine and a quarter of a glassful of Marsala or Madeira; add a little parsley and a bunch of sweet herbs; cook this until reduced to one third of the original quantity; then add two spoonfuls of tomato sauce and an equal quantity of strong stock, a little salt, and a pinch of cayenne pepper; boil up once, strain, and return to the fire with the truffles cut into quarters; cook the truffles in the sauce for five minutes; then drain the rigaglia, pour the sauce and truffles over them, cover closely, and set the vessel containing the rigaglia within another full of boiling water; when the rice is ready, arrange it in a circle on a very hot dish, dust thickly with grated Parmesan cheese, and pour the rigaglia and sauce in the centre; slice the sausages and arrange round the rice. This is a delicious dish; but there are many inexpensive risottos which are nearly as good. Risottos, indeed, may be varied ad infinitum to suit the taste and purse of the mistress of the house.

Scotch Woodcock. — Toast two slices of bread; butter them on each side; wash, scrape, chop very finely, and pound in a mortar four or five anchovies; spread this paste on the pieces of toast and put them together, the paste between them; cut into small squares; make a sauce with the yolks of two or three eggs, a gill of cream, and a piece of butter; heat and pour over the toast; serve very hot.

Dutch Cream Toast. — Take the remainder of some cooked ham, i. a, the bone with the fragments adhering to it; remove all fat, and dry it in the oven until it will grate like Parmesan cheese; toast, butter, and cut some bread as directed above; then spread it with the grated ham and fold it; make a sauce with the yolks of two or three eggs, a gill and a half of cream, a piece of butter, and more grated ham; heat, stir, and pour boiling hot over the toast, which must previously have been placed in a hot dish.

Fried Lentils or Beans. — One pint of plain boiled lentils; one ounce of chopped onion; two ounces of dripping.

Fry the onion brown in the dripping; add the lentils; season with salt, pepper, and the tiniest pinch of brown sugar; mix and toss well, brown thoroughly, and serve hot.

Baked Beans or lentils. — One pint of dried beans; a quarter of a pound of salt pork; two quarts of cold water.

Put the beans and pork into the cold water, bring them to a boil, and boil slowly for about twenty minutes; then put the beans, with about a teacupful of the water they were boiled in, into an open jar; season with salt and pepper to taste, and a heaping teaspoonful of molasses; mix and toss well, lay the pork on top, and bake for two hours or longer. The liquor in which the beans were boiled will, with a little soup meat, make an excellent broth.

Boiled Lentils or Beans. — One pint of yellow lentils; three quarts of cold water; one ounce of dripping; one tablespoonful of salt; one saltspoonful of pepper.

Wash the lentils well in cold water, and put them over the fire with the other ingredients; boil slowly until tender, that is, about three hours; drain off the water; add one ounce of butter, a tablespoonful of chopped parsley, a teaspoonful of sugar, and a little salt and pepper; mix and toss well, and serve hot.

Stewed Lentils. — One pint of plain boiled lentils; enough broth or pot liquor to cover them; one ounce of chopped onion; two ounces of beef dripping; a quarter of an ounce of chopped parsley.

Stew all together gently for twenty minutes, and serve hot.

Haslet Stew. — One fresh pig's or sheep's haslet; one ounce of salt pork, sliced fine; one onion, chopped fine; one dessertspoonful of salt; half a saltspoonful of black pepper; two bay leaves; two sprigs of parsley; one sprig of thyme; one ounce of flour; one gill of vinegar; half a pint of cold gravy; six potatoes, peeled and cut in dice.

Wash the liver, heart, and lights; chop into inch pieces; stew gently for two hours, and serve with roasted powdered parsley sprinkled on top.

Scotch Crowdie. — One pound of oatmeal; four quarts of pot liquor; one tablespoonful of salt; one saltspoonful of pepper; one ounce of butter.

Boil the oatmeal in the pot liquor one hour, stirring often; season, stir, and serve.

Oatmeal and Pease. — A quarter of a pound of fat bacon or pork cut into pieces half an inch square; two sliced onions; two teaspoonfnls of salt; one teaspoonful of pepper; one dessertspoonful of brown sugar; one pint of dried pease; three quarts of cold water; enough oatmeal to thicken.

Fry the bacon and onions together for ten minutes without burning; add the seasoning, the cold water, and the pease; boil the whole gently until the pease become quite soft; then stir in enough oatmeal to thicken, simmer twenty minutes longer, and serve hot.

Cheese Pudding. — Two quarts of water, seasoned with two tablespoonfuls of salt; one pound of yellow Indian meal, sifted; a quarter of a pound of grated cheese.

Stir the Indian meal into the boiling water; when well mixed stir in the cheese; boil twenty minutes, stirring often; put into a greased baking-pan, sprinkle a quarter of a pound of grated cheese over the top, and brown in a quick oven.

Stewed Tripe. — One pound of tripe cut into small pieces; half a quart of potatoes; half a quart of onions; a quarter of a pound of fine flour.

Put the tripe, potatoes, and onions in layers in a pot; season with one tablespoonful of salt and a level teaspoonful of pepper; mix the flour with a pint of water, and pour over the stew; add gradually two pints of water, put the pot over the fire, and boil gently one hour and a half.

Pease Pudding. — Soak one pint of dried pease in cold water overnight, tie loosely in a clean cloth, and boil two hours in pot liquor or water, putting them into it cold and bringing them gradually to a boil; drain them, and press through a sieve with a wooden spoon; season with a level tablespoonful of salt, a pinch of pepper, one ounce of butter, and one egg; mix, tie in a clean cloth, and boil half an hour longer; serve hot.

Ignachi d la Romana. — Make a plain boiled pudding of Hecker's farina, with milk and eggs in the usual proportions, but without sugar or flavoring; while still soft, and before it forms, pour it into a large shallow dish; when cold cut into small lozenges, and pack in layers in a buttered pudding-dish, sprinkling each layer thickly with Parmesan cheese, and dotting, also, with butter; sift grated cheese over the top, and bake brown in a quick oven.

MISCELLANEOUS DESSERTS.

Souffle of Chestnuts. — Roast three dozen large Spanish chestnuts; peel them carefully, and pound in a mortar; pass the puree thus obtained through a sieve; then return to the mortar with one half its weight of sugar, and, with the white of an egg, work to a smooth paste, and then mould into little balls the size of a large Spanish chestnut; roll each ball in beaten white of egg; drain for a few minutes on a sieve; then roll in crystallized sugar; let them stand ten minutes; then roll again in white of egg and crystallized sugar; arrange on buttered paper, at some distance from each other; cook in a slow oven twenty-five minutes; when cold, arrange in a pyramid on a folded napkin.

Hickory-Nut Balls. — Crack a sufficient quantity of good hickory nuts; pick out the meat, and dry in the oven; then pound in a mortar, and proceed as above. You may substitute brown sugar for the white in preparing the hickory-nut balls, if you choose.

Aniseed Balls. — The yolks of five eggs; sifted sugar and sifted flour, enough to work to a paste; a pinch of aniseed.

Beat first the sugar and then the flour to a paste; add the flavoring, and drop by spoonfuls on buttered paper; then put into a buttered mould and bake.

Baked Apples, No. 1. — Wash, and wipe dry, five firm apples, and cut out the blossom ends; pack them in a large pudding-dish; pour a cupful of water over them, cover the dish closely, set in a moderate oven, and steam until they are tender, and crack open ; then put into a cold dish, and pour over them the juice left in the baking-dish; Serve cold, with powdered sugar and cream.

Baked Apples, No. 2. — Pare very carefully and thinly, core, and fill the hollow of the core with loaf sugar; dust the apples with powdered sugar and cinnamon, and bake.

Siberian Crab Cheese. — Wipe the fruit with a clean, dry cloth, and cut out all damaged parts with a silver knife; put them in a covered jar in a slow oven until tender; then squeeze through coarse canvas; weigh the pulp, and allow three quarters of a pound of lump sugar to every pound of pulp; reboil for half an hour, skimming well; put into moulds, and, when cold, cover with brandied paper.

Apple Cake. — Half a pound of apples, peeled, cut, and cored; one pound of loaf sugar; juice of three lemons, and half the rinds grated.

Simmer in a stewpan four hours, until quite stiff; put in mould, and eat cold. A larger quantity can be made, and packed in jars, if desired; cover with brandied tissue paper, and again with white paper, and keep in a cool place; it will be hard, like the crab cheese in consistency, and is very good.

Coddled Apples. — Take large tart apples, wash, rub dry, peel thinly and delicately, and core them; throw the peel into boiling water; put into a porcelain-lined stewpan the weight of the apples in the best loaf sugar, and then strain the water in which the peel has been thrown, and pour over the loaf sugar enough of this water to barely float the apples; put the stewpan on the fire, and boil the sugar down to a clear syrup; then put in the apples; the stewpan should be sufficiently large to prevent the apples from touching each other; put in with the apples the rind of a large lemon prepared in the following manner: Peel the lemon thinly and delicately, taking care to"preserve the peel unbroken; then, with a pair of sharp scissors, cut the peel into long, very thin strings, taking care, as before, to keep the length unbroken; put this into the saucepan simultaneously with the apples, and cook until tender; eat cold. This is the best way of cooking apples.

Conde of Apples, Pears, Apricots, etc. — Boil some rice in milk; add, when cooked, a little fresh butter, vanilla, or other flavoring, and powdered sugar to taste; also, yolk of egg in sufficient quantity to color the rice yellow; then remove' from the fire, arrange in a circle on a hot dish, put a pyramid of apples, pears, or other stewed fruit in the middle, cover the ring of rice with apricot marmalade, and serve.

Apples with Butter (Cuisiniere Bourgeoise). — Take large, firm, tart apples, peel and core them carefully, cut them in half; butter a large, wide pie-dish, and arrange in it small squares or rounds of white bread (stale) about half an inch thick; each round or square should be exactly the size of one of the apple halves; when the mosaic of bread is neatly fitted to the dish, arrange the halved apples on the bread; fill the hollow of each apple with powdered sugar, and place on the sugar a small piece of very fresh butter; cook in a very slow oven; watch the apples carefully, and as fast as the sugar and butter are absorbed renew them until the apples are tender, and well cooked; serve hot in the same dish.

Apples with Rice {Cuisiniere Bourgeoise). — Butter a wide pie-dish, and place on it a layer, about an inch thick, of cold, boiled rice, in which you have beaten up two tablespoonfuls of apple jelly; arrange on this bed of rice a close layer of peeled, cored, halved, and half-stewed apples; put into a slow oven, and, when the apples are quite cooked, fill the hollow of each with apricot or other marmalade; serve hot.

Apples with Meringue. — Make a pyramid of coddled apples in the middle of a dish, cover it with a meringue made by beating up, very stiff, the whites of two eggs with two spoonfuls of powdered sugar, and a little zest of lemon; cover the pyramid carefully and completely with meringue; dust the meringue with powdered crystallized sugar; put into a gentle oven to brown, and serve as soon as lightly browned.

Apples Flambautes (Cuisinilre Normande). — Peel and core some firm, small apples, and stew with loaf sugar, a little lemon peel, and water enough to keep them from burning; when tender, but still firm, take them carefully out of the saucepan, and arrange them in a pyramid on a large pie-dish; boil down the syrup in the saucepan until it is very thick; pour it over the apples; dust the whole pyramid thickly with powdered sugar, and pour rum over all; just before setting the dish on the table set fire to the rum; serve blazing. This is an old Norman dish, and is very good.

Compote of Apples or Pears, with Butter. — Peel, core, and halve the fruit, and put into a saucepan with enough water to keep it from burning; loaf sugar to taste; a stick of cinnamon, and a piece of fresh butter the size of a large egg; cook on a slow fire until tender.

Croutes of Peaches. — Butter a large, shallow pie-dish, and cover it completely with slices of stale white bread fitted closely together, place upon these large ripe peaches cut in half, and stoned; fill the hollow left by each stone with powdered sugar, and a piece of very fresh butter; then cook in a very slow oven, watching carefully, and renewing the sugar as it is absorbed; serve hot in the dish in which the peaches have been cooked.

Croutes of Plums. — Proceed precisely as above.

Croutes of Apricots. — Proceed as above.

Macedoine of Fruit. — Have ready two dome-shaped fluted moulds; one must be smaller than the other, so as to leave a vacancy of three inches between the inner and outer mould; the inner mould must also be furnished with clamps at the edges, which will hold it firmly in position; place the larger mould on at least eighteen pounds of cracked ice; then carefully hook the other mould in place and pour into the larger mould enough clear, transparent jelly to fill the vacancy between the two moulds; the jelly, of course, may be of any color you prefer; as soon as it is quite hard and firm fill the inner mould three quarters full of warm water; this will enable you to detach it instantly and easily from the surrounding jelly; have ready, wellpicked and cleaned, from twenty to twenty-four fine strawberries, as many more very large strawberries, an equal quantity of white raspberries, and of white and red currants (strung); place in the dome of the jelly a layer of white currants; surround and place on these giant strawberries; then a layer of white raspberries; then pour on some melted jelly; as soon as the jelly hardens proceed to put in layers of fruit as before, alternating the colors and quality of the fruit; finish with a wreath of the giant raspberries, surrounding a mosaic of red and white strawberries; pour in as much clear jelly as the mould will hold; put on a tightly fitting cover; pile up the ice, and leave the mould; when the jelly is hard and firm plunge the form for a moment in boiling water, and turn out the macedoine on a cold plate; it is the prettiest possible dessert, and easily made, although the directions are necessarily prolix; it may be varied at discretion, and may be made in winter with preserved fruits.

Rhode Island Apple Slump. — Twelve large sour apples, pared, cored, and quartered; three cupfuls of molasses; a little grated nutmeg and cinnamon.

Line the sides of a baking-kettle with crust made from raised dough, or plain crust made light with soda or cream of tartar; allow enough crust to fold-over the top; put the apples in; sprinkle them with the spice; then pour in the molasses, fold the crust from the sides over the top, and cook for half an hour over a moderate fire.

Apple Pudding, known as Friar's Omelet. — Grated rind of one large lemon and juice of two added to the cooked apples; twelve large apples, stewed to a pulp; a quarter of a pound of butter, stirred in while the apples are hot; sugar enough to make it quite sweet, stirred in while the apples are hot; four eggs well beaten, stirred in when the apples are cold; a little grated nutmeg, stirred in when the apples are cold.

Butter well the bottom and sides of a large baking-dish, and line very thickly with bread crumbs; pour in the apple mixture, spread bread crumbs thickly on top, and stick over several bits of butter; bake in a moderate oven, and serve cold.

Apple Stephen. — One pound of suet, chopped fine; two pounds of sifted flour; eight large tart apples, cored and sliced; one pound of brown sugar; a quarter of a pound of dried currants, picked, washed, and dried; one ounce of candied citron, snipped fine; the rind of a lemon, grated; the juice of the lemon, also; a little ground cinnamon, and a few whole cloves.

Mix the suet and the flour with cold water into a mellow'paste; roll it well, and lay it in a deep earthenware baking-pan, which must first be well greased with suet; then mix all the other ingredients, except the apples, together, and put layers of apples alternately with the other ingredients until the dish is full; close the paste over the top as you do for apple dumpling, sprinkling brown sugar over the paste; bake it in a moderate oven for four or five hours, basting it every few minutes with the syrup which appears round the edges; when done turn it out on a flat, hot dish, and serve hot.

Fried Apples. — Peel and core some large, fine apples; cut in thick slices and soak for two or three hours in rum, sweet cider, or red wine, adding powdered cinnamon, loaf sugar, and spices to taste; then drain, roll in beaten egg and bread crumbs, fry quickly in butter, drain, dust with powdered sugar, and serve.

Fried Peaches. — Peel, stone, and quarter; soak for two hours in wine (white) and sugar, and proceed as above.

Fried Figs. — Peel the figs, which should be perfectly fresh and not too ripe; soak for two or three hours in rosolio; drain, cut in two, dust lightly with fine flour, and fry quickly in butter; dust thickly with powdered sugar, and serve.

Fried Apricots. — Take large apricots, not too ripe; peel, stone, and quarter; roll them in powdered sugar and arrange in a deep dish, dusting again with powdered sugar; they should remain for some hours; then roll in beaten egg, dust with flour, and fry quickly in butter; dust again with powdered sugar, and serve.

Damson Cheese. — Gather the fruit when full ripe, and to every speck of damsons allow four pounds of lump sugar; stone the fruit and set it in an oven, and let it remain until soft; when cold rub it through a colander or coarse hair sieve; then put it into a preserving-pan, and boil it quickly for half an hour; after which add the blanched kernels and the sugar, and boil together half an hour longer, stirring steadily all the time; wet the moulds with brandy or vinegar; put the cheese, when cold, into the moulds; cover with paper dipped in vinegar, and keep in a dry place; or else cover with paper dipped in white of egg.

Apricot Cheese. — Pare and stone the apricots, and allow a pound of loaf sugar to every pound of apricots; wet the sugar a very little, and boil fruit and sugar quickly; blanch the kernels and put into the cheese; thirty minutes will boil it; when cold put into pots or moulds as above.

Tipsy Charlotte. — Proceed as for Charlotte d V Orange, substituting for the orange juice two spoonfuls of orange or other wine; cut the top off a large, stale sponge cake; dig out the inside, leaving bottom and sides an inch thick; sprinkle freely with sherry or Marsala wine; pour in the cream, replace the top (drenching it also with wine), and serve.

Apple Charlotte. — Four large tart apples, peeled, cored, boiled, and beaten to a pulp; one egg, well beaten; grated peel of a lemon and the juice; sugar to taste.

Butter a mould of any shape, line it carefully and thickly with rolled and grated bread crumbs, pour in the apple, cover with a layer of bread crumbs half an inch thick, and bake to a light brown.

Or, you may line the mould with thin slices of stale white bread, buttered, and sprinkled with sugar.

Peach Charlotte. — Proceed as above, substituting stewed dried peaches for the apple, and orange juice and grated orange peel for the lemon.

Fresh Peach Charlotte. — Line a brick-shaped mould with slices of sponge cake d la Virginie, and fill with cutup and sugared peaches and the cream russe (unflavored). The russe and peaches should be beaten together long and well before being put into the mould; then set in a cold place, and turn out just before serving.

Charlotte-Russe d V Orange. — One pint of good cream; the whites of three eggs, beaten to the utmost; a quarter of a box of gelatine; one teaspoonful of orange brandy; two tablespoonfuls of orange juice; sugar to taste.

Dissolve the gelatine in as little water as possible; beat the cream to a stiff froth and sweeten it; then beat in the stiff egg froth; then beat in, drop by drop, the dissolved gelatine; then add the brandy and orange juice; line a glass dish with macaroons steeped in wine, pour in the Charlotte-Iiusse, and set in a cool place to congeal.

Florida Charlotte-Iiusse. — One quart of sweet, rich cream; one pint of sweet milk, scalded; one ounce of American gelatine, dissolved in tepid water; vanilla flavoring to taste; sugar to taste.

Beat the cream to a froth, and flavor it with vanilla; Stir the gelatine into the milk, but be careful not to leave it too long on the fire lest the milk should curdle; strain it, add a pound of powdered sugar, then, when cool, but not stiff, stir in the whipped cream; have ready fluted moulds, buttered, and lined with lady-fingers; pour in the mixture, and set away to cool; when cold turn out, and serve.

Charlotte Russe, Plain. — One quart of cream, whipped to a froth, and drained through a sieve; one pint of unclarified gelatine, melted and strained; flavoring to taste; sugar to taste.

Beat the melted gelatine into the whipped cream, stirring and beating continually until all is smooth; have ready moulds prepared as above; pour in the cream, and, when cold, proceed as above.

Gooseberry Cups (Meg Dodd). — Pick, wash, and wipe dry fine large gooseberries, and simmer over a slow fire until tender enough to pulp through a sieve, then add loaf sugar to taste (bearing in mind that they should be very sweet); replace on the fire, and cook slowly until quite thick; add half a cupful of melted gelatine, strain, pour into custard cups, and set away to cool.

Gooseberry Cake (Meg Dodd). — Three pounds of finest white flour, dried and sifted; a pound and a half of fresh butter; a pound and a half of powdered sugar; six eggs, yolks only; six teaspoonfuls of white wine; three teaspoonfuls of liqueur aVanisette; two grated nutmegs; rose water to taste; one pound of ripe gooseberries, picked, washed, and dredged.

Cream the butter and sugar, then add the well-beaten yolks, then the wine,liqueur, and spice; then the flour, then the rose water, and, lastly, the gooseberries.

Gooseberry Cheese. — One quart of gooseberries; one pound of powdered sugar; one pound of fresh butter; four eggs, yolks only, well beaten; macaroons, dried and rolled to powder.

Cream the butter and sugar, add the well-beaten yolks, then the rolled macaroons in sufficient quantity to bind all together; then the gooseberries, which should be previously prepared by having boiling water thrown upon them, and then mashed and rubbed through a sieve; mix and beat all well together.

Currant Grant. — Two teacupful of rice, washed and picked; one stick of cinnamon; sugar to taste; half a pint of fresh currant juice.

Put the rice and cinnamon into a porcelain-lined kettle, with enough water to cover it; let it simmer on the back of the stove until the rice bursts; sweeten to taste with powdered sugar; add the currant juice, let it come almost to a boil, then take from the fire and pour into porcelain moulds wet with cold water; serve cold with cream.

Cocoanut Marmalade. — One pound of grated cocoanut; one pound of powdered white sugar; half a pint of cold water; two eggs.

Make a syrup of the sugar, clarify it with whites of the eggs until clear, then add the coconut, which must cook until transparent; remove from the fire, and when it ceases to boil throw in the yolks of two eggs; replace on the fire, and heat only until like thick custard; when cooling, add a little rose or peach water; grate nutmeg on the top, and serve like custard, in small cups.

Almond Marmalade. — One pound of almonds, blanched and powdered to paste; one quart of water; one pound of loaf sugar; yolks of twenty eggs, beaten light.

Put the pounded almonds and water on the fire with a pound of loaf sugar, and, when the sugar is dissolved, stir in the yolks of twenty eggs, beaten light; serve as above.

Apple Citron. — Coddle some very green apples, rub them through a sieve, and to every pint of pulp add three quarters of a pound of fine sugar; squeeze the juice from two lemons, and boil the peel well; when it is soft, take away the white inner lining of the skin, cut the yellow rind into little slips; add them and the juice to the apple, and boil over a slow fire for an hour, stirring often to prevent burning.

Rice Meringue. — One quart of milk; half a cupful of rice; sugar to taste; small piece of fresh butter; whites of eight eggs.

Put the rice into the milk, and let it simmer for three hours, until quite smooth; then remove from the fire, sweeten to taste, and add a small piece of fresh butter; stir until well mixed; then beat the whites of four eggs, and beat into the rice, adding also a little grated nutmeg, and the finely grated rind of one lemon; pour into a buttered pudding-dish, and drop lightly on it the whites of the remaining four eggs, which should previously have been beaten to the stiffest possible froth with five tablespoonfuls of sugar and the juice of a lemon; bake to a light brown in a slow oven; eat cold.

Philadelphia Meringue. — The yolks of five eggs well beaten ; a quarter of a pound of sifted sugar; flavoring to taste; one pint of rich cream.

Beat the yolks of the eggs very light with the sugar; flavor to taste; heat a pint of cream d bain-marie; when it begins to boil-take it from the fire and stir in the eggs and sugar; return to the fire, and stir until very thick; then pour into a dish and let it cool; then beat the whites of five eggs with some powdered sugar to the stiffest possible froth; put this on the cream, and set it in the oven for a few minutes to dry.

Omelette au Sucre, or Sweet Omelet (Cuisiniere Bourgeoises — Six eggs beaten to the utmost, whites and yolks separately; when both whites and yolks are well beaten, beat into the yolks powdered sugar and zest of lemon to taste; then add the beaten whites, beat all together hard and long, adding a little sweet milk and a pinch of salt; put your omelet into the pan, and, when it browns, dish, fold" dust with powdered sugar, glaze with a salamander (red-hot iron) and serve.

Omelette au Rhum (Cuisiniere Bourgeoise). — Proceed precisely as above, but just before putting on the table pour some good old rum over the omelet, and set it on fire; serve blazing.

Omelette aux Pommes (Old Virginie's). — Pare, peel, quarter, and half stew some* nice tart apples, then prepare an omelet as above, and, just before putting it in the omelet pan, stir the apple quarters well through it; then fry, fold, and dust with sugar as above.

Omelette aux Confitures, or with Preserve. — Prepare as for sweet omelet, substituting cream for the milk; when you dish, put two or three spoonfuls of any preserve you prefer on the omelet; then fold, and dust with powdered sugar.

Omelette Souffle, No. 1 (Cuisiniere Parisienne). — Six eggs, whites and yolks beaten separately to the utmost; four ounces of powdered sugar; zest of lemon to taste.

When the eggs are beaten, beat the sugar into the yolks; then add the zest of lemon, then beat in the whites very lightly; pour at once into a deep earthen dish, well buttered; dust lightly with powdered sugar, and bake in a quick oven; seven or eight minutes should suffice; serve in the same dish.

Omelette Souffle, No. 2. — The yolks and whites of six eggs, beaten separately to the utmost; six tablespoonfuls of finely powdered sugar; a little peel, grated from the surface of a fresh lemon; a quarter of a pound of fresh butter.

Beat the yolks and whites separately until they are a very stiff froth; then beat them together, then beat in the sugar and lemon; melt the butter in a pan, pour in the beaten eggs, and stir them until they have absorbed all the butter; then pour into a buttered dish and bake; serve as soon as browned. Omelette souffle should be taken directly from the oven to the table in the dish in which it was baked.

Rice Panada. — Half a pound of rice; a quarter of a pound of suet; one tablespoonful of salt; one tablespoonful of sugar; half a pound of the finest white flour, sifted; one quart of water; one gill of molasses.

Boil the rice, suet, and sugar fast in boiling water for fifteen minutes; then mix well together the flour, water, and molasses; stir into the boiling rice, and cook five minutes.

Stuffed Peaches. — Take large ripe peaches, cut them in half, take out the stones, crack them, and pound the kernels in a mortar, and mix smoothly with a little bread crumbs soaked in rich cream, a pinch of powdered cinnamon, and sugar to taste; place all the peaches on a large, shallow, earthenware dish, and fill the cavity left by the stone with the above-named mixture, heaping it well up; in the small spaces between the peaches place bits of fresh butter, pouring in, also, a little white wine; shake finely sifted powdered sugar thickly and evenly over all; finally cover with a light, even layer of finely grated and browned bread crumbs; then place the dish in the oven, and let it remain until the peaches begin to assume a light-red color.

Stuffed Apricots. — Choose large, fine, ripe apricots, and treat in precisely the same way, adding a few bitter almonds to the stuffing.

Stuffed Apples. — Peel and core large tart apples, and stuff them with a mixture of bread crumb soaked in cream, blanched and pounded apple seeds, a pinch of cinnamon, and the same of nutmeg and a larger quantity of sugar than you would use for peaches or apricots; stick some cloves in the apples, and arrange the apples in a deep earthenware dish, placing lumps of the best quality of loaf sugar between the different apples, and pouring a very little cold water into the bottom of the dish; bake in a slow oven. These apples should be eaten cold, with a little cream flavored with lemon juice; they will be found delicious.

Stuffed Pears. — Are treated in the same way, using less sugar, and putting a tiny pinch of cochineal in the bakingdish in order to give the pears a fine red color. They are very good.

Fried Plums. — Take large, firm plums, not too ripe; wipe and set in a slow oven for half an hour; then cut in half, stone, peel, and soak in liqueur, rum, or brandy for two or three hours; then drain, roll in beaten egg, dust with flour, and fry quickly; they should be dusted thickly with powdered sugar before serving.

Baked Pears. — Proceed as for "Baked Apples, No. 1."

Or, if the pears are large, cut in half, put in a deep dish with a very little water, and sprinkle them with sugar and a pinch of ginger, cinnamon, or cloves; cover closely, and bake until tender.

Baked Quinces. — Pare, quarter, and seed the quinces; then stew them in clear water until a straw will pierce them; put into a baking-dish with half a cupful of loaf sugar to every eight quinces; pour over them the liquor in which they were boiled, cover closely, and bake in the oven one hour; then take out the quinces and put them into a covered dish; return the syrup to the saucepan and boil twenty minutes; then pour over the quinces, and set them away to cool.'

Stewed Apples. — Select fine juicy apples, peel, and core; put into a saucepan with just enough water to cover them, cover the saucepan closely, and stew the apples until they are tender and clear; then take them out, put them into a deep dish, and cover them; add to the juice in the saucepan a cupful of loaf sugar for every twelve apples, and boil it half an hour, adding to the syrup a pinch of mace and a dozen whole cloves just ten minutes before taking it from the fire; pour scalding hot over the apples, and set them in a cold place; eat ice cold with cream.

Stewed Pears. — One quart of small ripe pears, washed and wiped dry, but not "pared or cored; half a cupful of loaf sugar.

Put the pears into a saucepan with just enough water to cover them, and stew until tender; then add the sugar and stew all together ten minutes; take out the pears, lay in a covered bowl to keep warm, add to the syrup a little ginger and a clove or two, boil fifteen minutes longer, and pour over the fruit hot.

Italian Stewed Pears. — One quart of small pears, peeled, but not cored; half a cupful of loaf sugar.

Proceed as above; but as soon as the sugar is dissolved add enough cochineal to color the pears and syrup a bright red; and, when the pears are dished, stew in the syrup a little candied orange and lemon peel.

Pears Stewed Brown. — One quart of hard, tough pears, peeled and with the blossom ends cut out; one cupful of molasses, best quality; a pinch of ginger.

Stew as above until very tender; then dish, cover, and add to the liquor in the saucepan an equal quantity of molasses and a little ginger; boil half an hour, skim, and return the pears to the saucepan; stew all together twenty minutes. This is really the best way of stewing pears.

Souffle au Riz. — The yolks of four eggs; six teaspoonfills of boiled rice; one piece of very fresh butter the size of an egg; lightly grated rind of a fresh lemon; half a quart of milk.

Stir all well together, put on the fire, and stir with a wooden spoon until the mixture has boiled up once or twice; then remove from the fire, and when cool beat in the yolks of four eggs (already well beaten) and the whites of six, previously beaten to a stiff froth; add powdered sugar and lemon juice to taste; beat smoothly together, and, if too stiff, add beaten white of egg until it is of the proper consistency; pour into a buttered mould, dust with powdered sugar, and bake in a quick oven; twenty minutes should suffice; serve at once in the dish in which it was baked.

Tot Fail. — Mix the yolks of eggs with the finest white flour (sifted) until you have a stiff paste; then reduce this paste to a light batter by adding a little fresh milk, and white of egg, well beaten; add sugar to taste, and flavor with vanilla, zest of lemon, or orange-flower water; when the tot fait is soft, smooth, and light as a feather, pour on a buttered pie-dish, and bake instantly in a quick oven; serve as soon as risen and browned.

Tot Fait with Fruit. — Proceed as above; but before sending the tot fait to table, cover with a layer of delicate preserve. This must be done quickly, lest the kit fait should fall. Fresh fruit, sugared, may also be used.

Souffle au Cafe. — The yolks of four eggs, well beaten; six teaspoonfuls of potato flour; a piece of very fresh butter, the size of an egg; zest of a lemon; half a quart of milk, with coffee to taste.

Mix the above ingredients smoothly together; then put on the fire, and stir with a wooden spoon until the mixture boils up twice; remove from the fire, and, when cool, add the beaten yolks of four eggs, and the stiffly beaten whites of six, with sugar to taste; beat well together and pour into a buttered mould, cooking as for souffle au riz. This receipt may be varied at pleasure — for chocolate souffle or fruit. If properly made it is very good.

Light Snow Dessert Husks, or Dampf-Nudeln. — One quart of the finest white flour, sifted; enough yeast to make it rise; two tablespoonfuls of white sugar, powdered; one tenth of a quart of rich cream; a piece of butter the size of a turkey's egg; the yolks of three eggs, well beaten; a pinch of salt.

Make into a very soft dough, cover, and let it rise; when it has risen s0 that it is very light, dip out of the dough with a spoon pieces as large as an egg; form them into balls with floured hands; then put them on a baking-tin, strewn with flour, and let them rise still more; meanwhile put into a saucepan just enough milk to cover the bottom, a piece of butter the size of an egg, and a tablespoonful of powdered sugar; let it come to a boil, and put the nudeln in just half an hour before you eat them; do not put them too close together; cover the saucepan closely, and put a cloth dipped in hot water round the lid, so that no steam can escape; let the nudeln boil slowly until you hear them crackle, which happens when the milk has evaporated, and the nudeln begin to brown; then place the saucepan on one side of the stove, uncover it, and when the nudeln are nicely browned on the bottom take them out and place them on a round hot dish. Make a sauce of boiling cream or milk; beat up in it the yolk of an egg, flavor with vanilla, and sweeten to taste; serve in a sauce-boat.

RIPE FRUIT FOR DESSERT.

General Mules. — Berries ought always to be picked over very carefully, but should never be washed or sugared before being served; arrange on a bed of fresh leaves, and set in a cool place until wanted; serve powdered sugar and cream with berries of all kinds.

Peaches, Plums, Apricots, etc. — Pick over carefully, and dust, if necessary; do not wipe, lest you remove the bloom, which is the chief beauty of all stone fruit; arrange in pyramids interspersed with fresh leaves.

Or, cover the fruit-dish with a bed of fresh leaves, and arrange the fruit in Parisian fashion, i. e., in a four-sided pyramid, the stem ends turned inward. Cherries are extremely pretty arranged in this way.

Apples, Pears, etc. — Wash, wipe dry, and rub to a bright polish with a cloth; arrange in pyramids interspersed with green leaves.

Orange Salad. — Pare and slice in rounds fine ripe oranges; sprinkle with powdered sugar; then pile in a glass dish, and pour a couple of glassfuls of wine, or, better still, a tumblerful of orange and lemon juice, half and half, over all; sprinkle again with sugar, and serve at once.

Currants and Raspberries. — String the currants, and pick both raspberries and currants over carefully; mix in even quantities; put into a glass dish, and eat with powdered sugar.

Ambrosia, No. 1. — Eight fine ripe oranges, peeled and sliced; half of a grated cocoanut; half a cupful of powdered sugar.

Arrange the orange in a glass dish, sprinkle the cocoanut thickly over it, sprinkle with sugar, and repeat this process until the dish is full.

Ambrosia, No. 2. — Peel and "fig" the oranges; carefully pick out all the pulp, rejecting the thin skin and seeds; then proceed as above.

Tutti-Frutti Fruit Salad. — Prepare some oranges as above, and arrange in a glass dish with an equal quantity of sliced bananas, and "pulled" (not sliced) pineapple, strawberries and raspberries if you have them, etc.; sugar to taste; add wine or orange juice, and set on the ice for an hour before serving.

Crystallized Currants. — Pick over carefully equal quantities of white and red currants; dip each bunch carefully in beaten white of egg and a little cold water (mixed); then roll in powdered crystallized sugar; do this once or twice until the bunches are well frosted; lay on white paper to dry; then arrange in a dish for dessert.

HOME-MADE CANDY.

Cocoanut Candy. — Grate a cocoanut, and boil it with one pound of white sugar; wet with the milk of the nut; let it boil slowly until thick, then pour it out on buttered plates.

Peanut Candy. — Two quarts of peanuts, roasted in their shells, and then shelled and hulled; two pounds of lightbrown sugar.

Boil the sugar in a preserving-kettle with enough water to wet it thoroughly, and form a syrup; when the sugar begins to boil, throw in the white of an egg to clear it; strain it, and try, by dropping a little of the sugar into cold water, if it is done enough; if it hardens and becomes brittle it is sufficiently boiled, and must be taken from the fire; the blanched nuts must then be stirred thoroughly through the sugar; then wet with a brush a marble slab, free from all grease, and drop the hot mixture upon it; flatten into small oblong blocks; when cold take them off the board with a knife.

Almond Candy. — Two quarts of sweet almonds; two pounds of light-brown sugar.

Blanch the almonds and roast them in the oven; then proceed precisely as for peanut candy.

Walnut or Hickory-nut Candy. — Blanch some walnuts or hickory-nuts in boiling water; when blanched set them aside; then boil together one cupful of water, three cupfuls of brown sugar, and four ounces of butter; let it boil without stirring until it candies; then proceed as for peanut candy.

Maple-Sugar Caramels. — Two pounds