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Applied Biotechnology and Biosensor Laboratory

 

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Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Guilbeau

 

 

 

Eric J. Guilbeau, Ph.D.

Phone: 318-257-5280

 

Dr. Guilbeau leads the Applied Biotechnology and Biosensors laboratory.He is the Academic Director for Biomedical Engineering and the Watson Eminent Scholar Chair in Biomedical Engineering.He is also the Director of the Center for Biomedical Engineering Research and Rehabilitation Science (CBERS).Prior to joining Louisiana Tech University, he was the Olin Professor of Bioengineering at Arizona State University (ASU).At ASU he was the Founding Chair of the Harrington Department of Bioengineering and also served as Chair of ASUís Department of Chemical, Bio & Materials Engineering.He has been named a fellow of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering and the Biomedical Engineering Society.He is past President of the Biomedical Engineering Society.He helped establish the National Council of Chairs of Bioengineering and Biomedical Engineering Programs and has served as its chair.He is a past chair of the Academic Council of the American Institute of Medical and Biological Engineering.†† Dr. Guilbeau is an ABET Program Evaluator and represents BMES as an alternate on the ABET Board of Directors.He served as the first chair of the Accreditation Activities Committee of the Biomedical Engineering Society and helped insure a smooth transition of Biomedical Engineering accreditation activities oversight from the IEEE to the BMES.His teaching areas are mostly focused on the application of transport phenomena in biomedical engineering and introducing students to opportunities in biomedical engineering. His research experience includes contributions in the areas of biosensor development, biotransport phenomena, systems analysis and simulation of physiological systems with applications in diabetes, cardiovascular disease and applied biotechnology.

 

Staff

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: G Nestorova PhotoGergana Nestorova, M.S., Research Associate and Research Scientist I, Biovations, LLC

Mrs. Nestorova provides half-time research support for all biological activities within the Laboratory for Biosensors and Applied Technology and is a Research Scientist for Biovations, LLC working within the Applied Biotechnology and Biosensors Laboratory to develop thermoelectric methods for genetic mutation (SNP) genotyping. Mrs. Nestorova has both academic training and practical experience in molecular biology, nanotechnology, and microfluidics.Prior to joining LA Tech she worked at Stanford University where she was involved in studies using gene expression, comparative genomic hybridization (CGH), chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), methylation and microRNA assays.Her expertise includes gene expression analysis, quantification of protein and protein isoforms, and detection and kinetic analysis of biomolecular interactions. She has experience using the Luminex 100 for measurement of inflammatory marker levels in biological fluids, the Firefly 3000 for quantification of proteins and protein isoforms, and the ForteBio Octet system for detection and kinetic analysis of bimolecular interactions.Current projects include contributions to the development of a novel thermoelectric method for DNA sequencing in a microfluidic device, a novel method for thermoelectrically detecting DNA hybridization, and new technology to quantify the levels of 8OHdG in Alzheimer transgenic mice urine using capillary electrophoresis with laser induced fluorescence detection.

 

Varun Kopparthy, M.S., Biomedical Engineer I, Biovations, LLC.

Mr. Kopparthy received the Bachelor of Technology degree in Biomedical Engineering from Jawaharial Nehru Technological University and the Master of Science degree in Biomedical Engineering from Louisiana Tech University.He is currently employed by Biovations, LLC and is working in the Applied Biotechnology and Biosensors Laboratory developing thermoelectric microfluidic systems for genetic mutation assay.His technical skills include: Lay-by-Lay self-assembly, MEMs fabrication, mask design and alignment, microfluidic device design and fabrication, micro-controller programming, MATLAB signal and image processing, CoventorWARE simulation, Keil u-vision, AutoCAD, LabVIEW, NI LabVIEW signal Express, PSPICE, Multisim, C-programming.His prior research experience includes the design and development of a micro-controller based heart rate acquisition system, and development of thermoelectric sensing systems for the measurement of glucose, L-glutamate and DNA sequencing.

Doctoral Students

Siva Mahesh Tangutooru, B.S. Biomedical Engineering, Osmania University.

Mr. Tangutooruís research seeks to design, fabricate, and test the performance of a microfluidic L-Glutamate (L-Glu) biosensor based on a novel thermoelectric biorecognition strategy.L-Glu is an important excitatory neurotransmitter that plays a key role in brain cell processes such as learning and memory.His work seeks to provide scientists with a low cost L-Glu biosensor technology for use in understanding the spatial and temporal dynamics of brain cell and network excitation and communication.In collaboration with neuroscientist Dr. Mark DeCoster the research seeks to answer the question, ďIs it possible to monitor the rapid dynamics of brain cell L-Glu release and uptake by detecting the heat that is released from deamination of L-Glu during an enzymatic reaction?ĒThe goal is to develop a sensing device with the sensitivity, stability and response time needed to study the L-Glu release from neurons, astrocytes, and glioma. To achieve this goal, three objectives will be accomplished.Objective 1: Design and fabricate a microfluidic device with an integrated thermoelectric L-Glu biosensor with the sensitivity and response time needed to measure rapidly changing L-Glu concentrations within the small volume of fluid flowing within the microfluidic device.Objective 2: Immobilize brain cells on the surface of the lower channel wall of the microfluidic device developed in Objective 1 at a location upstream from the microfluidic deviceís integrated thermoelectric L-Glu biosensor.In a series of carefully designed experiments, demonstrate that the dynamic release of L-Glu by the immobilized brain cells can be monitored by the thermoelectric L-Glu biosensor.Objective 3: Use the microfluidic device with integrated L-Glu biosensor and each of the three types of immobilized brain cells to study the dynamics of L-Glu release from the respective cells following stimulation of L-Glu release.

Description: Description: Description: Description: Description: GCSP recepientsLouis G. Reis, B.S. Biomedical Engineering, B.S. Chemical Engineering, Louisiana Tech University

Mr. Reis earned his B.S degrees in Biomedical and Chemical Engineering at Louisiana Tech. He is continuing his education at Louisiana Tech by working on his M.S. in Microsystems Engineering and his Ph.D. in Biomedical Engineering. Mr. Reisís research aims at designing, fabricating, and testing a non-enzymatic glucose sensor by measuring changes in osmotic pressure. Unlike enzymatic sensors, non-enzymatic sensors are not limited or affected by enzymatic degradation, oxygen concentrations, and electrode fouling among other factors. This fairly new concept of measuring changes in osmotic pressure to detect changes in glucose levels enables the use of simple technology that is both passive and power-conservative to continuously monitor glucose levels. Previous research has showed that a glucose osmotic pressure sensor can operate effectively in a static fluid. Mr. Reisís work seeks to investigate the possibility of operating such a device in a dynamic fluid. His work will progress towards imitating the dynamics of blood flow in arteries and capillaries in order to create a functioning continual glucose sensor that can directly measure blood glucose. His work is funded by the National Science Foundation Graduate Research Fellowship Program.††

Masterís Students

Bindu Susmitha Adapa, B.S. Biomedical Engineering, Jawaharlal Nehru Technological University.

 

Ms. Bindu's research intents to design, fabricate and test the performance of a microfluidic device to detect the DNA hybridization.Unlike various other methods of DNA hybridization, she utilizes the nano volts of natural heat produced by the exothermic reactions of DNA hybridization. Her work involves the fabrication of highly sensitive thermopiles for the thermoelectric method of detecting DNA hybridization. Her research also includes different ways of immobilizing DNA.

 

Joshna Reddy Nimmala, B.S. Pharmacy, Kakatiya University, India.

 

Ms. Reddy is pursuing the M.S. in Molecular Science and Nanotechnology.Her research seeks to develop various strategies for immobilizing DNA on microfluidic devices for microfluidic DNA sequencing.She is also investigating novel methods to quantify DNA immobilization.Applications include microfluidic detection of genetic mutations.